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Full text of "TV Radio Mirror (Jan-Jun 1962)"

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AUDIO-VISUAL CONSERVATION 
at The LIBRARY '/CONGRESS 




Packard Campus 

for Audio Visual Conservation 

www.loc.gov/avconservation 

Motion Picture and Television Reading Room 
www.loc.gov/rr/mopic 

Recorded Sound Reference Center 
www.loc.gov/rr/record 




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isemary and Jose Ferrer 

Ihy They Had to Split! 

BABY for ELVIS 



lyMrs.Como Didn't Go 
Her Sons Wedding 



Every Month! 
Bonus Section! 

RECORD 

Buyer's Guide! 



WINKLE: The Moose with the Most 




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A FRESH, CLEAR RADIANCE YOUR SKIN CAN EASILY HAVE! 



IVORY 




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POST GRADUATE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Room 9R12 - 121 S. Wabash Ave., Chicago 3, III. 

Send me, without obligation, your FREE sample lesson 
pages, and your FREE folder "Nursing Facts." 

NAME 



POST GRADUATE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Room 9R12 - 121 S. Wabash Ave., Chicago 3, III. 

Send me, without obligation, your FREE sample lesson 
pages, and your FREE folder "Nursing Facts." 



NAME. 



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ADDRESS. 
CITY 



ZONE. 



STATE. 



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AND I WILL RUSH TO YOU... 



FREE NURSES BOOKLET 

AND SAMPLE 
► LESSON PAGES 



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HOME IN ONLY 10 SHORT WEEKS 

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YOUR AGE AND EDUCATION ARE NOT IMPORTANT . . . Good common sense 
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POST GRADUATE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

ROOM 9RI2 - 121 SOUTH WABASH • CHICAGO 3, ILL. 



JANUARY, 1962 



MIDWEST EDITION 



VOL. 57, NO. 2 



Ann Mosher, Editor 

Teresa Buxton, Managing Editor 

Barbara Greenwald, Associate Editor 



Jack Zasorin, Art Director 

Frances Maly, Associate Art Director 

Eunice Field, West Coast Representative 



STORIES OF THE STARS 

A Flair for Laughter (Milt Kamen) by Charles Miron 9 

Hollywood He-Men — Athletes All (prime "beefcake" pictures for the girls! ) 10 

Jackie Gleason : A Father at Last 14 

The Unpredictable Brian Kelly by Harry Flynn 16 

The Networks' Answer to Criticism of Juvenile Shows by Helen Bolstad 18 

Why They Had to Split! (Rosemary Clooney and Jose Ferrer) by Beatrice Emmons 20 

A Baby for Elvis Presley 22 

Bullwinkle: The Moose with the Most by Roger Beck 24 

"Why I Married an Older Man" (Gigi Perreau) by Dick Kleiner 26 

"Why I Married an Older Woman" (Michael Landon) by Tex Maddox 28 

It Takes A Fool to Be a Lady Comic (Carol Burnett) by Jim Morse 30 

Hollywood's Biggest Tourist Attraction (Lawrence Welk) by Marilyn Beck 32 

The Advantages of Being Shy (Joan Harvey) by Frances Kish 34 

TV Radio Mirror's New Face of the Month : Robert Goulet by James Taylor 36 

"Fads and Foibles" (picture story from The Du Pont Show Of The Week) 38 

Why Mrs. Perry Como Didn't Go to Her Son's Wedding 42 

Meet the Neighbors (the "indispensables" on top TV shows) 44 

The Transcontinental Joey Bishops 46 

NEW RECORDING SECTION 

On The Record : Special 8-page Magazine Within a Magazine 80A 

SPECIAL MIDWEST STORIES 

No Time for Sleep (Richard Hickox of WISH-TV) 49 

Showcase of Chicago (Repertoire Theatre of WBBM-TV) 50 

0-0-0 O'Neill (Jim O'Neill of KDWB Radio) 52 

People Are His World (Eddie Clarke of KMBC Radio) 54 

FUN AND SERVICE FEATURES 

Information Booth 3 

What's New on the East Coast by Peter Abbott 4 

What's New on the West Coast by Eunice Field 6 

Beauty: Make-Up on the Gold Standard (Robbin Bain) by Barbara Marco 64 

New Patterns for You (smart wardrobe suggestions) 69 

New Designs for Living (needlecraft and transfer patterns) 74 



The Bullwinkle cover is an original drawing by Bill Scott, co-originator of The Bullwinkle Show 



<, * 



Published Monthly by Macfadden Publications, Inc. Execu- 
tive, Advertising, and Editorial Offices at 205 E. 42nd St., 
New York, N. Y. Editorial Branch Office, 434 N. Rodeo Dr., 
Beverly Hills, Calif. Gerald A. Bartell, Chairman of the Board 
and President; Frederick A. Klein, Executive Vice-President- 
General Manager; Robert L. Young, Vice-President; S. N. 
Himmelman, Vice-President; Lee Bartell, Secretary. Advertis- 
ing offices also in Chicago and San Francisco. 
Manuscripts: All manuscripts will be carefully considered but 
publisher cannot be responsible for loss or damage. It is ad- 
visable to keep duplicate copy for your records. Only those 
manuscripts accompanied by stamped, self-addressed return 
envelopes with sufficient postage will be returned. 
Foreign editions handled through Macfadden Publications 
International Corp., 205 East 42nd Street, N. Y. 17, N. Y. 
Gerald A. Bartell, Pres.; Douglas Lockhart, Vice-Pres. 
Re-entered as Second Class matter, June 28, 1954, at the Post 
Office at New York, N. Y., under the Act of March 3, 1879. 
Second-class postage paid at New York, N. Y. and other 
post offices. Authorized as Second Class mail by the Post 



Office Department, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, and for pay- 
ment of postage in cash. © 1961 by Macfadden Publications, 
Inc. All rights reserved. Copyright under the Universal Copy- 
right Convention and International Copyright Convention. 
Copyright reserved under the Pan American Copyright Con- 
vention. Todos derechos reservados segun La Convencion 
Panamericana de Propiedad Literaria y Artistica. Title trade- 
mark registered in U. S. Patent Office. Printed in U.S.A. by 
Art Color Printing Co. 

Member of the Macfadden Women's Group. 
Subscription Rates: In the U.S., its Possessions, & Canada, 
one year, $3.00; two years, $5; three years, $7.50. All other 
countries, $5.50 per year. 

Change of Address: 6 weeks' notice essential. When possible 
please furnish stencil-impression address from a recent issue. 
Address changes can be made only if you send us your old 
as well as your new address. Write to TV RADIO MIRROR, 
Macfadden Publications, Inc., 205 East 42nd Street, New 
York 17, New York. 



Buy your February issue early • On sale January 4 



Information Booth 



• In answer to many, many requests, 
Information Booth each month 
will spotlight off-the-screen 
lives of the top daytime serial 
stars. Send us a card, indicating 
your own favorite personality! 





Rosemary Prinz 



Mark Rydell 



I 



Some Quickies 

/ would like to know the birthplace 

and birthdate of actress Carole Wells. 

CM., Homer, N. Y. 

Carole was born in Shreveport, Loui- 
siana, on August 31, 1942. 

Are June Blair (David Nelson's wife) 
and Janet Blair related? Also, where 
can I write to Mike London? 

P.S., West Palm Beach, Fla. 

No. Janet's real name is Martha Jane 
Lafferty. Write to Mike, NBC-TV, 3000 
W. Alameda, Burbank, Calif. 

Can you please tell me how old Kathy 
Young really is? She's such a doll! 

D.D., Seward, Neb. 



Kathy was sweet sixteen on October 



21. 



Will you please tell me where and 
when Ronald Reagan was born? 

H.W., Atco, N. J. 

Ronald was born in Tampico, Illinois, 
on February 6, 1911. 



We'll answer questions about radio 
and TV in this column, provided 
they are of general interest. Write to 
Information Booth, TV Radio Mir- 
ror, 205 E. 42nd St., New York 17, 
N. Y. Attach this box, specifying 
network and program involved. 
Sorry, no personal answers. 



Here's Jeff 

Who is the king of the daytime seri- 
als? Many insist it is Mark Rydell, who 
for the past five years has played Jeff 
Baker in As The World Turns. ... A 
native New Yorker, Mark at first 
planned to make piano and conducting 
his career — he studied at Juilliard 
School of Music, Chicago University 
and New York University — but ended 
up throwing himself into acting. He 
studied at several dramatic workshops 
and, after a while, his TV experience 
began to mount up. Only 32, Mark has 
close to 200 television shows to his 
credit. Among them, he has performed 
on Alcoa-Goody ear Theater, Naked 
City, The Web, and Danger! ... A 
handsome 5-foot-10, with dark hair and 
hazel eyes, Mark is still unmarried. He 
says, with a smile, "You can say I'm 
terribly eligible and am looking for a 
girl who appreciates the arts, but who 
doesn't necessarily have to be an ac- 
tress." He lives in a typical bachelor 
apartment on New York's East Side, 
with a piano and an enormous collec- 
tion of jazz records for companions. An 
accomplished pianist, conductor and 
arranger, he favors jazz piano. He 
reads "everything," but has a special 
fondness for Thomas Wolfe. ... In 
regard to the many queries asking if 
Mark and Rosemary Prinz are steady 
daters, the answer is "no." Although 
they did date before their TV "mar- 
riage," it was strictly for fun. . . . 
Mark's ambition? To combine direct- 
ing with his successful role as Jeff. 



Here's Penny 

Many a budding young actress has 
worked at odd jobs while trying to build 
a theatrical career. So it was with 
flame-tressed Rosemary Prinz, alias 
Penny Baker of the daytime series, As 
The World Turns. Petite Rosemary — 
5-foot-2, 96 pounds — has worked as a 
door-to-door pots-and-pans salesgirl, a 
hatcheck girl, a typist and a department 
salesgirl. . . . Her first dramatic ex- 
perience came at the age of sixteen, as 
an apprentice in summer stock. She 
soon graduated to ingenue roles and, 
after high school, went on the road, 
playing Corliss in "Kiss And Tell." In 
rapid succession, she did more road 
shows, half-a-dozen Broadway and off- 
Broadway plays, plus a good deal of 
nighttime TV drama. A highlight of her 
career was receiving the Wildberg-Gil- 
more Award as the most promising ac- 
tress in 1950. . . . Today, Rosemary is 
a busy gal, often arriving at the studio 
at 7:30 a.m. and remaining till 5:30 
p.m. Nights, she learns dialogue for the 
next day, takes classes in "body move- 
ment," studies voice, French and col- 
lege courses, and attends a professional 
drama workshop. She is a gourmet 
cook and, having studied piano, she 
loves music. (Her father, Milton, was 
a brilliant concert cellist who worked 
under the great Toscanini and, later, in 
the Firestone Orchestra.) . . . Now di- 
vorced, "home" for Rosemary is a 
small midtown New York apartment 
near the East River — "furnished in a 
way that expresses my many interests." 




1 




WHAT'S 

NEW 

ON 

THE 



Adorable Cynthia Pepper of ABC-TV's Margie series has 
described herself as "a kind of female Dwayne Hickman." 




Um-m-m, it's Gena Rowlands and 
Robert Lansing of 87th Precinct. 




Bob Hope's 

Spectacular 



all set for NBC-TV 
in early December. 



COAST 



by PETER ABBOTT 



Jangle Bells : Talk that Jerry Lewis 
may return to TV next season. . . . 
Johnny Carson altar-bound again? 
. . . NBC execs mumbling in their 
beards because Marilyn, who was 
too exhausted to make that TV spe- 
cial, is now finding the energy to 
start another film. . . .TV producers 
looking north. Production costs in 
Canada are about one-third of state- 
side budgets. . . . Tennessee Ernie 
Ford returns to TV in the spring 
with a daytimer over ABC. . . . Paul 
Anka on the town with a Copa cutie. 
. . . Harry James and Betty Grable 
would love to do a TV series. . . . 
Welcome back to Calvin And The 
Colonel, which will get a half-hour 
of the open time left by the demise 
of The Roaring 20's. Other half goes 
to Room For One More, comedy with 
Andrew Duggan and Peggy McCay. 
. . . Garroway's friends bet he'll be 
back in harness next season. . . '. 
Dick Clark very happy with a pri- 
vate secretary. Not his own. 

The Holiday Twist: Anita Ek- 
berg nixing TV offers but will make 
two movies stateside. . . . Star of 
one of the highest rated TV shows 
gets his way by crying backstage. 
. . . Will David Susskind and PM's 
Joyce Davidson elope? . . . 20th 
Century-Fox hops onto the "cultural 



I 





Funnyman Bob Newhart has pet 
peeve — he really hates offices! 



Watch for Betty White and the Tournament 
of Roses Parade as colorcast over NBC-TV. 




Bert Parks happy with new 
musical quiz over ABC-TV. 



wagon" with development of a half- 
hour series based on the classic 
poetry of Homer. Ulysses will be the 
hero and some dramatic license will 
be taken. It was not revealed wheth- 
er "The Odyssey" will be turned into 
an adventure or situation comedy 
series. . . . Robbin Bain, of Today, 
is a former "Miss Rheingold." Yet 
she hates beer, loves to get twisted 
up with pretzels. . . . The Twist is 
the rage of N.Y.C., endorsed enthu- 
siastically by high society and the 
teen-age set. . . . Fabian not hurting 
his popularity by accepting TV 
scripts that are suggestive and vio- 
lent. . . . Steve Lawrence and Eydie 
Gorme have put in another order 
with La Stork. Eydie has been or- 
dered by her doctor to take it real 
easy. 

Televitis: Paar wants Downs to 
take over the nighttime series when 
he retires at the end of March. But 
Hugh says, in effect, "If nominated, 
I will not run." Downs doesn't say 
that Paar is irreplaceable, but in- 
sists that he's not the one for the 
job. ... On December 10, NBC-TV 
comes up with a video version of 
the 1946 hit movie, "Notorious." 
Joseph Cotten is set to play the 
boss of a South American spy ring. 
. . . The rumor that Steve Allen and 



his new bosses at ABC are at it 
hammer-and-tongs is untrue. They 
are using only sharp pencils. . . . 
Juliet Prowse nabs ten grand for 
her Xmas date with Como. . . . 
Hollywood tragedy: A champagne 
cork popped into Jill St. John's eye 
and gave her a mouse. 

Sing Along With Me: Whether or 
not Robert Stack decides to renew 
his contract this spring may not be 
important. Sing Along With Mitch 
is gunning down The Untouchables 
in the rating war. . . . Network execs 
confused. No matter which way they 
turn, they get spanked. Adventure 
shows are criticized for violence; 
comedy series are said to be sheer 
idiocy; and no one wants cultural 
shows, even the sponsors. . . . The 
Brighter Day's use of blind actors 
was initiated by a fan letter asking 
the producer to set an example in 
the employment of the handicapped. 
. . . Satchmo up for a Congressional 
medal. . . . NBC-TV will be in a 
switch New Year's Day. First, the 
network picks up the Tournament 
of Roses Parade with Betty White 
and John Davidson at the mike, 
Next, NBC goes to the Sugar Bowl 
for the pigskin play-off, then back 
to California for the Rose Bowl 
game. . . . Danny Thomas advised 



by medics he's working too hard 
and must slow down. . . . Bob New- 
hart insists script conferences take 
place in his apartment. Can't stand 
to be in an office. Reminds him of 
the days when he was an account- 
ant, which he loathed. 

And All That Jazz: CBS-TV's 
Twentieth Century concentrates on 
Dave Brubeck, New Year's Eve, with 
films shot at Basin Street East and 
during rehearsal at Brubeck's Con- 
necticut home. . . . Who can explain 
audience reaction? Garry Moore, 
who loves jazz, found his evening 
audience cooling off when he pre- 
sented a jazz star. On the other hand, 
Merv Griffin and Arthur Godfrey 
emphasize jazz and find their day- 
time audiences love it. . . . The Sam 
Cookes expecting. . . . Ever wonder 
about what's happened to Tony 
Marvin? He's working a full day on 
commercials and as a newscaster at 
Mutual. He still prizes his profitable 
and long association with Godfrey 
and thinks it's just a matter of an- 
other season before he's back on 
network TV. . . . Hugh O'Brian's 
dream comes all the way true. He 
will make Broadway in a show of 
his own, and will be directed by 
Alfred Lunt himself. . . . Tony Per- 
kins, they (Continued on page 57) 



WHAT'S JNEW or\ 



by EUNICE FIELD 




Wedding bells pealed again for 
Ruth Warrick and Carl Neubert. 




* Thoughtful Sam Jaffe gave the 
top billing to his wife Bettye. 
6 



Pet Projects: Hawaiian Eye star 
Anthony Eisley says the family 
Persian has struck up a tender 
friendship with a backyard squir- 
rel. Watching "Putter" (the cat) 
frolic with "Nutty" in a tree of 
their North Hollywood yard, Tony 
at first thought of having his cat 
analyzed. On second thought, he 
did what every actor does by in- 
stinct . . . call a producer and ask 
for an "audition." Walt Disney lis- 
tened gravely to Tony's recital of 
the goings-on 'twixt Putter, the 
cat, and Nutty, the squirrel, and 
finally said, "I think there might be 
a story in it . . . but we'd have to 
change the names around. That 
cat's definitely 'Nutty.'" . . . And 
then there's Shirley Booth, who's 
no wackier than her TV charac- 
terization of Hazel. Shirley has 
three female pets — a parakeet and 
two French poodles. Before leav- 
ing to go to dinner one night, she 
called to a friend, "Turn on the 
television for the girls." Somewhat 
taken aback, the friend complied. 
She was startled to see the dogs 
jump onto the couch and the bird 
fly to the top of the cage and stare 
expectantly at the screen. The 
show came on, but the dogs barked 
and the parakeet scolded shrilly. 
"What do they want now?" in- 
quired the benumbed friend. "Oh, 
the sound's too low . . . how can 
they tell what they're watching if 
they can't hear the dialogue?" 
called Shirley. 

Greater Love Hath No Actor 
than when he gives up billing to 
to his wife. When famed actor Sam 
Jaffe and actress Bettye Acker- 
man (Mr. and Mrs. in private life) 
were signed to play Dr. David Zor- 
ba and Dr. Maggie Graham on 
Ben Casey, Sam was naturally 
offered co-star billing with Vin- 
cent Edwards. He resisted this 
honor, and then insisted that wife 
Bettye's name go above his on the 
dressing room they share. "I've 
had my day at stardom," explained 
Sam, "and I say, 'move over for 
the younger people' — my lovely 
wife included." 

Bride's Father Gives Wife 
Away: It's all really very simple. 



Leon Ames — who is the TV father 
of Myrna Fahey and the TV hubby 
of Ruth Warrick, who is the TV 
"mother of the bride" — put his 
head together with his real-life 
wife's and arranged a party where 
Ruth could meet her ex-real-life 
hubby, Carl Neubert . . . with the 
result that Ruth and Carl decided 
to remarry and so the "father of 
the bride" (TV, that is), gave his 
"wife" away (TV, that is) . . . now 
isn't that clear? 

Playing the Field: Jack Carter, 
TV and night-club comedian mak- 
ing his movie debut in "The Hori- 
zontal Lieutenant," at MGM, was 
asked why it had taken him so 
long to make his film bow. "I'll 
tell you," he explained. "A long 
time ago, I was up for a small role. 
I discovered all I was supposed to 
say was 'Ho,' so I turned it down. 
They said they'd enlarge the role. 
Sure enough, they did. I was to 
say 'Ho, ho!' Well, I decided that 
I just wasn't ready for the movies, 
so I returned to clubs and the 
theater to get experience." . . . 
Fabian's Bus Stop segment now 
looks definitely postponed until 
mid-season. Fabe, who plays a 
psychological killer in it, is said 
to be great, but there's opposition 
by censors in the front offices, who 
feel his actions in the episode might 
have a bad influence on his fans. 
... It took Ann Doran a whole 
year to do it, but she finally per- 
suaded the National Velvet brass 
to get her a completely new ward- 
robe and hairdo. It seems that, last 
season, Ann wore the same dress 
throughout and it was giving her 
a complex. "They're not Diors," 
says Ann, "but at least the dresses 
are new." ... Is Jim Garner doing 
the "method" actor casual-clothes 
bit? Hollywood wonders. He 
showed up at Jack Kelly and Mae 
Wynn's fifth anniversary party 
minus tuxedo. He was the only 
male at the party of 200 minus 
black-tie. . . . Dan Duryea finally 
figured out what a "compatible" 
TV set is. "It fogs up for you — 
plays beautifully for your wife's 
relatives!" 

(Continued on page 8) 



THE WEST COAST 



The stars shone brightly at the "King of Kings" premiere 







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It's Jack Benny with his ever-loving Mary. 



Johnny Walsh squired young lovely, Lori Martin. 




Ann Doran and Arthur Space of National Velvet es- 
corted his real daughters — Sondra (left) and Susan. 



Carole Wells showed up with Bob Bishop, 
who is fast becoming her favorite beau. 




WHAT'S NEW ON THE WEST COAST 



(Continued from page 6) 
Personal Notes: Edd Byrnes — 
just about the only Warnerite who 
hasn't submitted and sold an original 
story to his own series — explains: 
"The only writing talent I have is to 
endorse my weekly paycheck!" . . . 
Banner Films' "angry young man 
of television" — Dr. Albert E. Burke, 
whose A Way Of Thinking lectures 
are geared to get citizens to "think" 
— seems headed for a network slot. 
His show has aroused more com- 
ment than Alexander King, Mike 
Wallace and Oscar Levant rolled 
into one. . . . Former "Champagne 
Lady" Roberta Linn wed bandleader 
Freddie Bell in Las Vegas when he 
was "between shows" at the Sahara 
Hotel. It was Roberta's first mar- 
riage, and former boss Lawrence 
Welk was one of the first to wire 
congratulations. ... In his upcom- 
ing Target: The Corruptors guest- 
ing, Dean Jones will sing a number 
entitled "I Lost My Best Friend." 
He wrote both the lyrics and music 
for it, and his recording is scheduled 
to come out day-and-date with the 
TV showing. . . . Broderick Craw- 
ford bought two houses in Europe 
— one on the island of Rhodes, an- 
other off the coast of Spain. He hopes 
to retire abroad within two years. 
. . . George Maharis's two brothers, 
Robert and Paul, and his sister Pa- 
tricia have been signed to appear 
with him in a Route 66 segment. . . . 
David Nelson has gained ten pounds 
since his marriage — for a good rea- 
son. Bride June Blair is a good cook, 
but has a passion for tacos. She 
cooks them three nights a wee>. . . . 
Gardner McKay soon stars in his 
first feature, "Watcher in the Shad- 
ows," so co-star Guy Stockwell will 
carry at least six shows without 
Gar's usual Adventures In Paradise 
presence. . . . Don Porter, erstwhile 
Ann Sothern leading man, stars in 
the East Coast touring company of 
"The Best Man." A shrewd busi- 
nessman, Don is one actor in a posi- 
tion to pick his roles. He long ago 
invested in real estate — today owns 
several apartment houses. 

The Younger Set: Fourteen- 
year-old Lori Martin had her first 
real date for the premiere of "King 
of Kings" — but it was with "old 
friend" Johnny Walsh. Johnny, un- 
der contract to Warner Bros. Rec- 
ords, lives in Glendale — not far 
from Lori's home in Burbank — and 
they've known each other "since we 
were children," says Lori, who be- 
comes more sophisticated and beau- 



tiful each day. Another "King of 
Kings" premiere attendee, Carole 
Wells, was escorted by Bob Bishop, 
who had beaued her for three years. 
Though Carole has dated Peter 
Brown, Duane Eddy, George Hamil- 
ton and many other eligible actors, 
Bob is still her favorite date and 
she says she's becoming more sure 
all the time that he may be "the 
only man in my future." 

The Brave Don't Cry: When 
Larry Pennell of Ripcord quit pro- 
fessional baseball for a career in act- 
ing and signed up with Paramount, 
he wired his former team, the Bos- 
ton Braves, as follows: "Movie 
money has made it impossible for 
me to be a Brave again." The next 




Fabian, shown with Dianne Foster, 
will "turn killer" in Bus Stop episode. 



week, he got his first part in "The 
Far Horizons," with Charlton Hes- 
ton and Fred MacMurray. After 
reading the script, Larry rushed 
to the phone and sent another wire 
to Boston. "Just got first role — was 
I ever wrong! I'm playing an Indian 
— and I don't get the girl!" 

The Lively Arts: Many stage, 
screen and TV stars have taken up 
painting for a hobby, and John Beal, 
who emotes in all three mediums, 
is a professional portrait painter on 
the side. Recently, he sent out a 
circular, giving examples of his work 
and offering to do portraits based 
on photographs. Beal — who picks up 
his mail in Higganum, Connecticut 
— later got a note in the mail signed 
"Ardent Fan." The note enclosed 
a signed but blank check and said, 
"I would like a portrait, please, at 
your usual rate — but instead of do- 
ing one of me, would you please do 



one of yourself and send it to the 
above address?" 

The Heel of Fortune: Morey 
Amsterdam, philosophizing about his 
career, says: "I'm not lucky. But 
this co-star spot on The Dick Van 
Dyke Show is a real break. Funny 
thing about TV — time means noth- 
ing. People come up to me and say, 
'Hey, I saw you on The Ed Sullivan 
Show the other night.' And maybe I 
did the Sullivan spot two years ago. 
Anyway, I'm lucky they remember 
those guest shots at all. It was usu- 
ally my luck to either follow a pre- 
cocious kid or a guy on crutches 
who's just sung, 'God Bless Amer- 
ica.' " 

Hollywood-Go-Round: Dean 
Martin, explaining just what the 
Sinatra-Lawford-Martin-Davis et al 
group is: "The Clan? The Rat Pack? 
That's not us at all. We're more 
like a P.T.A.— a Perfect Together- 
ness Association." . . . Bob Cum- 
mings, on his biggest problem in 
launching his latest CBS-TV show: 
"I do all my own flying and at first 
the sponsors, the network and ev- 
eryone else concerned took a dim 
view of it. After all — what if I had 
an accident? I convinced them 
finally that I'd been soloing for 
thirty-five years, come next March 
3, and never even had the experi- 
ence of running out of gas." . . . 
Blind author James B. Garfield — 
whose show, A Blind Man Looks At 
You, has been on KGFJ Radio for 
twelve years — celebrated his eighti- 
eth birthday recently by paying a 
visit to his alma mater, the Inter- 
national Guiding Eyes school, with 
his guide dog "Fiera." Said Garfield, 
"I certainly enjoyed the trip. It's 
always good to see old friends 
again." The genial gentleman, 
blinded late in life, insists he sees 
better now with his heart than he 
ever did with his eyes. . . . Delia 
Reese, discovered when she was 
thirteen, while singing with the 
Mahalia Jackson group, had Miss 
Jackson and her Meditation Singers 
with her recently when she played 
Las Vegas. It was their first appear- 
ance together in more than fifteen 
years. . . . Maureen O'Hara's Colum- 
bia LP is due out this month. . . . 
Singer Roberta Sherwood has made 
a pilot, Bringing Up Mother, for 
producer Tony Owen, Donna Reed's 
husband. . . . Margie Regan and 
Ron Harper of 87th Precinct dis- 
covered each other with their first 
on-screen kiss, and friends predict 
wedding bells will ring. 



_- -—- 






r> 



\ 




Sophisticated comedian 
Milt Kamen finds life a barrel 
of laughs. But it wasn't always so 






by CHARLES MIRON 

Housewives across the nation who lis- 
ten to ABC Radio's network feature, 
Flair, are becoming devotees of the dis- 
tinctive humor of Milt Kamen. In fact, as 
one of the country's hottest comics, Kamen 
is in such demand these days that life 
seems very good to him. 

But, in other years, Milt's lot in life 
was considerably less than amusing. "It's 
hard to be funny when you might get your 
head beat in," he observes, remembering 
all too well the (Continued on page 66) 

Milt Kamen is on Flair, the big weekday variety 
program heard nationwide over ABC Radio. 
Check papers for time in your area. 



r 



HOLLYWOOD 

HE-MEN 



The stars of today are the superb sportsmen of yesterday. 

A nostalgic album of how todays beefcake idols looked when 

muscular skill meant more than acting ability 




1951: Movies discover 
diomond — Kevin Connors, 6- 
foot-6 basketball star 
from Seton Hall (N.J.) now 
playing pro baseball 
(for Dodgers, Cubs, etc.)! 
"Chuck" later won greatest 
fame as TV's Rifleman. 



■ Is it just coincidence that so many of 
today's male TV stars have a solid back- 
ground in sports? Hollywood hipsters 
think not, usually cite one of three 
reasons: (1) Sports fame, with its atten- 
dant publicity, is a shortcut to show-biz 
success. . . . (2) It takes the same sort of 
dedication, drive and self-discipline to 
succeed in show business as it does in the 
arena. . . . (3) Female fans are irresist- 
ably drawn to a male with a fine physique 
— a man who radiates health and sheer 
animal magnetism — and are willing to 
overlook whatever shortcomings he may 
have as to talent, so long as he's a big, 
handsome hunk of man. . . . Whatever 
the reason, there are more former sports 
heroes among today's stars than ever 
before in Hollywood history. Many cap- 
italize on their athletic fame to get a 
first foot inside the stage door, then keep 
in the limelight through talent alone. 
Others are discovered through their per- 
forming abilities, then disclose their 
sports prowess later. . . . One way or 
another, the ten athletes seen here are 
prime exhibits to prove why modern 
talent scouts must keep their eyes on 
both sporting events and little-theater. 

Continued l 




r 



u 



■> 



gptr 

■-1 



10 



1946: Robert Stack, young Hollywood actor, 
impresses in water sports at Lake Tahoe! 

Untouchables hero has always been on-target: 
All-American skeet-shooting champ at 16; 

crack pistol shot and polo player in college; 
also has cups for outboard-motor racing. 






■ 




Athletes 




7,000 "rassles" later, Bomber Kulkavich 
became actor Henry Kulky — Hennesey's lov- 
able Max! Below: Scott (then "Denny") Miller 
dribbled a smart basketball, as senior guard 
on UCLA, team of 1 958-59— before 
he even dreamed of joining TV's Wagon Train. 




HOLLYWOOD 
HE-MEN- 



The stars of today arp the superb sportsmen of yesterday. 

A nostalgic album of hotv todays beefcake idols looked when 

muscular skill meant more than acting ability 




1951: Movies discover 
diamond — Kevin Connors, 6 
foot-6 basketball star 
from Seton Hall (N.J.) now 
playing pro baseball 
(for Dodgers. Cubs, etc.)! 
'Chuck" later won greatest 
fame as TV's Rifleman. 



■ Is it just coincidence that so many of 
today's male TV stars have a solid back- 
ground in sports? Hollywood hipsters 
think not, usually cite one of three 
reasons: (1) Sports fame, with its atten- 
dant publicity, is a shortcut to show-biz 
success. ... (2) It takes the same sort of 
dedication, drive and self-discipline to 
succeed in show business as it does in the 
arena. ... (3) Female fans are irresist- 
ably drawn to a male with a fine physique 
— a man who radiates health and sheer 
animal magnetism — and are willing to 
overlook whatever shortcomings he may 
have as to talent, so long as he's a big, 
handsome hunk of man. . . . Whatever 
the reason, there are more former sports 
heroes among today's stars than ever 
before in Hollywood history. Many cap- 
italize on their athletic fame to get a 
first foot inside the stage door, then keep 
in the limelight through talent alone. 
Others are discovered through their per- 
forming abilities, then disclose their 
sports prowess later. ... One way or 
another, the ten athletes seen here are 
prime exhibits to prove why modern 
talent scouts must keep their eyes on 
norh sporting events and little-theater 



Continued 



► 



1946: Robert Stack, young Hollywood actor, 

r,!ZTn 'l W0+ L er S P° r+s a+ Lak « T °hoe! 
' "tarrtaWw hero has always been on-target: 

rm.l TTT" skeet -*h°oting champ at 16; 
croc p.stol shot and polo pl^ yer in "college 
oho has cups for outboard-mot 




Athletes 



7,000 "rassles" later, Bomber Kulkavich 
became actor Henry Kulky — Hennesey'i lov- 
able Max! Below: Scott (then "Denny") Miller 
dribbled a smart basketball, as senior guard 
on U.C.L.A. team of 1958-59— before 
he even dreamed of joining TV's Wagon Train. 



tor racing 




HOLLYWOOD HE-MEN-Athletes All 




nMHHVQnai ■■■■!•■*■■■ 

|g| iflP ■■ ■■■ ^* *^ ^^^ ^m^mUMM^B 







Western series, Lawman, spurred co- 
star Peter Brown's interest in riding! He 
trained his TV mount himself, is seen 
at left winning blue ribbon at Devonshire 
Downs — first horse show he entered. 



Who doesn't know by now that Dennis Weaver's limp in Gunsmoke is a stunt 
performed by a top athlete? Back in Missouri, he set school track records — later led 

an Oklahoma U. squad to regional triumphs. Dennis placed high in tryouts for 
1948 Olympics, has kept in shape over the years by practicing in his own backyard. 






12 










Van Williams — above, setting a high- 
school record in 1952 — is an all-around 
athlete. The Surf Side 6 sleuth 
played football for Texas Christian, 
once taught skin-diving in Hawaii. 



Champ hobbyist Bill Leyden, of It Could Be You, 

likes anything connected with speed. A former Air Force 

pilot, he races now in boats and cars (as above). 



Before Fabian zoomed to teen-age stardom, he was 
tops on club-sponsored basketball teams in Philadelphia 
also halfback on his high-school football team. 




Texas A.&M.'s Ty Hardin would be a foot- 
pro today — instead of Bronco on The Cheyenne 
Show — if it hadn't been for gridiron injuries. 






/""" 



/ 



Art 



bfc 



y^ 






-/ 




l 



/ ^ 



I 



MM 



1 



Km 



.*ME 






1 



J %« I . I E GLEASOJV : 



i una »i last 



■ Some five years ago, Jackie Gleason con- 
fided to a reporter: "Somewhere along the 
road, I lost a fine family. Three of the loveliest 
girls in the world slipped through my fingers. 
One was Genevieve, my wife. The others were 
Geraldine and Linda, my daughters. These 
three women — and you can take my word for 
it — are the greatest!" 

Last September 9, Jackie and "the three 
loveliest girls in the world" were reunited 
when Geraldine, now 22, exchanged marital 
vows with Los Angeles advertising executive 
John Chutuk. But, immediately after the rites 
and wedding reception, Jackie experienced the 
familiar feeling of having the women slip 
through his fingers. His wife and younger 
daughter, Linda, left for their Beverly Hills, 
California home. Geraldine and her husband 
departed for Los Angeles. Jackie remained in 
New York — alone. 

It would be incorrect to say that the rotund 
performer had "lost a daughter but gained a 
son" through those nuptials at St. Paul the 
Apostle Church. In Jackie's own words, he 
lost Geraldine years ago. She herself described 
their relationship in a national magazine last 
November. "All my life," she wrote, "much 
about my father has been a mystery to me. I 
have worshipped him, believed in his talent 
and been awestruck by his brilliance. But I 
have never entirely understood him." 

At Geraldine's wedding in New York City, 
Jackie made a serious effort to recapture the 
feeling that once existed for the Gleason 
family. He slipped into a paternal attitude that 
had become so strange for him. Though 
Jackie's an accomplished actor, his perfect 
performance as "father of the bride" wasn't an 
act. He was genuinely nervous, as any dad 
might be on such a momentous occasion. His 
hands trembled noticeably while helping Ger- 
aldine out of the car on arrival at the church. 



Strain etched new lines in his face, through- 
out the preliminaries. And as he approached 
the top of the aisle, perspiration trickled down 
his expansive face in tiny rivulets. It took 
some appropriate wisecracks from his daughter 
Linda, 20, to bring back the familiar grin 
known to so many millions of TV viewers and 
moviegoers. 

As a matter of fact, Linda stole the spotlight 
from her father — something few entertainers 
in show business can boast! The vivacious girl 
was everywhere at the same time. She gave 
out details of the gowns to the press, intro- 
duced her mother to Jackie's friends, fixed the 
hems and adjusted the frills of other girls at 
the wedding party, joshed and kidded with her 
father and sister, kept everyone's spirits up. 
Later, she rounded up the wedding party for 
the reception, arranged for formal pictures. 

Jackie just shook his head in amazement at 
Linda's tireless activities. "Poor Geraldine," 
he said in mock sadness. "She's merely the 
bride today!" But Linda's take-charge attitude 
wasn't surprising. She is very much like her 
illustrious dad — outgoing, bubbling with joy 
and vitality — though she, too, suffered the pain 
of loneliness in being separated from her father 
on so many occasions and for so long a time. 

Jackie once said about his daughters: "I 
wasn't always home to give them all the love 
they deserved, but few fathers hoped harder 
for their happiness, and prayed harder for 
their goodness." 

The Gleason girls seldom visited their father 
more than once or twice a year, over the past 
decade. When they did come to New York, 
Jackie lavishly entertained them and their boy 
friends. He delighted in showing off his beau- 
tiful girls to all his friends in the glitter spots 
of Manhattan. A few years ago, on their an- 
nual trek East, the youngsters were promised 
by Jackie that he'd (Continued on vage 76) 



His hand trembled, touching hers. His daughter Geraldine a 

hride—and so beautiful ! W hat had he lost in all those years? 



15 



Like a famous Kelly named Grace (no relation), the co-star of Straightaway was born with 



the 
Unpredictable 

Brian Kelly 




16 



It's a snappy 

racer for Brian in 

Straigh tazvay — 

a snappy co-star in 

the person of 

young John Ashley. 



Former top athlete Kelly will try anything once — even 

with a trick knee from football! Latest is sand-skiing: From 

left to right — Brian, ski champ Penny Pitou, singer Molly Bee, John Ashley. 






P. 



r . *1 •*». 




1 



wtlf money, charm and good looks. Oh, yes, brains and acting talent, too. He can afford to be 




Brian has always dated inside show biz, looks serious now with Laura Devon. 



by 

HARRY 

WLYNK 



■ Three years ago, when the world was young and Brian Kelly lived in the 
Hollywood Hills near another aspiring actor named Gardner McKay, Brian owned 
an overgrown pooch named "Pussycat." According to Gardner, Brian 
stopped by his house one Friday afternoon and deposited Pussycat. "Can you 
watch him for me for the weekend?" was the request. Not wanting to be 
unneighborly, Gar acquiesced, Brian was hopping back to Detroit to visit 
his folks Saturday and Sunday. Sure, Gar would baby-sit with Pussycat. 
After all, Pussycat was a fine animal. So fine was Pussycat, in fact, that when 
Brian appeared to pick him up, McKay didn't want to part with him. He'd 
grown attached to the dog. Taking him now (Continued on page 72) 

Brian is Scott Ross and John is Clipper Hamilton on Straightaway, seen on ABC-TV, Fri., 
7:30 P.M. EST, as sponsored by Autolite Division of the Ford Motor Company, and Mobil Oil. 



17 



Like a famous Kelly named Graee (no relation), the co-star of Straightaway was born wij 



the 
Unpredictable 

Brian Kelly 




It's a snappy 

racer for Brian in 

Straightaway — 

a snappy co-star in 

the person of 

young John Ashley. 



Former top athlete Kelly will try anything once — even 

with a trick knee from football! Latest is sand-skiing: From 

left to right — Brian, ski champ Penny Pitou, singer Molly Bee, John Ashley. 



16 




mone y, charm and good looks. Oh, yes, brains and acting tale 



nt, too. He can afford to be: 




by 
HARRY 
FLY.W 



Brian has always dated inside show biz, looks serious now with Laura Devon. 



■ Three years ago when the world was young and Brian Kelly lived in the 
Hollywood Hills near another aspiring actor named Gardner McKay, Brian owned 
an overgrown pooch named "Pussycat." According to Gardner, Brian 
stopped by his house one Friday afternoon and deposed Pussycat. Can you 
wateh him for me for the weekend?" was the request. Not want.ng to be 
rneighb'rly Gar acquiesced, Brian was hopping back to Detroit to visit 
. , c ,i i c * a=„ ar ,H Sunday Sure, Gar would baby-sit with Pussycat. 
After all SSS was a fine animal. 'So fine was Pussycat in fact, that when 
After all, "^V* fa McKay didr / t want to part with him. He'd 

^^njgg^g ^. Taking him now (Con.nW on V a 9e 72) 

, i l ; c rlinnpr Hamilton on Straightaway, teen on ABC-TV, Fri., 

^oVM S KT,^ponl^b y ' Auioiii: D,vi,ion of .he Ford Moior Company, and Mobil Oil. 



17 



The networks' answer 
to criticism of 



JJODW 





dqcsot 




American Newsstand: At ABC-TV, editor-producer Fred Sheehan (in short sleeves) gets youthful slant on daily 
news from anchor-man Roger Sharp (left) and two recent journalism grads — Bill Lord and Dave Jayne (at right). 




s* 




X 



Update: Young Bob Abernethy (center) is on-the-oir editor for NBC-TV's survey-in-depth of the week's events. Left 
— news producer Leonard Leddington, executive producer George Heinemann; right— -director Don McDonough. 



by HELEN BOLSTAD 



■ Is the private life of today's high school student 
bounded by a date, a car and the next hit record? . . . 
Or do the tension and excitement of world events 
stir his curiosity and make him want to know more 
about the living history which affects his future? . . . 
It is true that froth and/or violence have been re- 
garded by some programers as the sure-fire formula 
for quickly gathering a large teen-age audience. This 
season, however, two networks have bet the serious 
side and scheduled programs of news prepared espe- 
cially for young people. 

ABC-TV gave its American Newsstand a ready- 
made audience by allotting it the time immediately 
following Dick Clark's popular American Bandstand. 



NBC-TV telecasts its Update for a half-hour begin- 
ning at noon on Saturday. Both programs fit into the 
new trend toward public-service broadcasting — but 
both networks deny that Federal Communications 
Commission chairman Newton Minow's speech criti- 
cizing television as "a vast wasteland" had anything 
to do with nudging these shows into the schedule. 
An NBC spokesman points out: "Mr. Minow made 
his speech last April. We cut our pilot for Update in 
March." ABC — where James C. Hagerty, former press 
secretary to President Eisenhower, is now a vice- 
president — says of its Newsstand: "This is part of Jim 
Hagerty's plan to expand our news service." Yet 
there is no doubt that this is (Continued on page 75) 



Update. NBC-TV's news show for teen-age students, Sat., from 12 noon to 12:30 P.M. EST, is sponsored by Helena Rubinstein. 
American Newsstand, seen on ABC-TV, Mon. through Fri., 4:50 to 5 P.M. F.ST, is sponsored by Milton Bradley and I.ehn & Fink. 



19 



Rosemary Clooney 





SPLIT 




by 

BEATRICE 
EMMONS 



and Jose Ferrer 



■ "That little baby carriage will save 
your marriage" is an old wives' notion 
which has been tried and exploded 
many times in Hollywood. The most 
recent and saddest case in point is that 
of Rosemary Clooney, who had five 
babies in less than eight years, all 
in a vain hope of holding on to 
her actor-director-producer husband 
Jose Ferrer. 

"It was something I grew up with, 
the idea that having a big family was 
the best guarantee for a happy mar- 
riage. I'm afraid that, like all recipes, 
much depends on who's doing the 
cooking and under what conditions. I 
did my best, and for a long time I 
thought the Ferrers were a happy 
harmonious family. Our divorce plans 
go to prove there is no sure-fire formu- 
la to keep a marriage from breaking." 
This, in essence, is the statement made 
by Rosie as she placed her charge of 
"extreme mental cruelty" against Joe 
into the record in Santa Monica court. 

The announcement came as a stun- 
ning shock to most of show business, 
though there are some — on intimate 
terms with the Ferrers — who say they 
are not surprised. "They were always 
an oddly assorted couple," these 
sources declare. It is an opinion which 
has occasionally been expressed since 
the beginning of their courtship in 
1953. And it is easy to see why. It has 
something of the flavor of the Arthur 
Miller — (Continued on page 67) 




/ 



W 













>^*—m 








\ 



Baby scenes in Paramount 
film "G.I. Blues" played 
for laughs — but gave true 
picture of the star's own 
innate tenderness and win- 
ning ways with small fry. 



i^™ 



^""■™ 



A brother or sister of his oivn — that's what 

Presley wanted, more than anything else in the world! 

The one thing fame and riches cannot bring . . . 




It was good news Vernon Presley and his charming second wife, 
Dee, brought Elvis in Florida. Good news for the still-young father 
and for the sensationally successful son . . . the son whose early 
loneliness had never quite been banished . . . whose sense of 
loss and unearned guilt mourned a twin he couldn't remember. 



■ It shaped up in rehearsal as a very funny scene. Against veteran actor 
Arthur O'Connell's mugging, Elvis Presley snapped off a smooth, expertly 
timed retort, and pretty Anne Helm gave a giggle that wasn't in the script. 
Gordon Douglas, the director of "Pioneer, Go Home," looked pleased. "Leave 
it in," he said. Everything was going just right. 

Then one of the soundstage phones rang. 

A moment later, a studio guard came up to Elvis. "Long distance, Mr. 
Presley." The grin faded from Elvis's face. Tense, strained lines appeared 
around his lips and eyes. "Excuse me," he said to the company, and walked 
to the phone on the rear wall. Members of the crew moved off, tactfully 
busying themselves elsewhere. Arthur O'Connell looked after Elvis in 
surprise. "He looks scared," he said. 

Five minutes passed. Then ten. It was time to shoot the final version 
of the scene. The actors took their places. The cinematographer readied his 
camera. Douglas glanced uneasily about. "Where's Elvis?" he said. There 
was a movement in the shadows back of the soundstage. Elvis came toward 
the set. In ten minutes, he seemed to have aged as many years. His head 
was held low. The touch of swagger had vanished from his walk. Silently, 
he took his place. 

O'Connell spoke his lines. Anne Helm gave the next cue. They looked at 
Elvis, hut there was no reaction A moment passed. (Cnvtinupd on pnqp 62) 



23 




' V 




I 



0m 



Baby scenes in Paramount 
film "G.I. Blues" played 
for laughs — but gave true 
picture of the star's own 
innate tenderness and win- 
ning ways with small fry. 



4 hr0tker 0r sist <* of his own-that's what 
Presley wanted, more thn n 

e thm "Whins else in the world! 

^e one thin g fame and riches cannot brin g . . . 




It was good news Vernon Presley and his charming second wife, 
Dee brought Elvis in Florida. Good news for the still-young father 
and tor the sensationally successful son . . . the son whose early 
loneliness had never quite been banished . . . whose sense of 
loss and unearned guilt mourned n twin he couldn't remember. 



■ It shaped up in rehearsal as a very funny scene. Against veteran actoi 
Arthur O'Connell's mugging, Elvis Presley snapped off a smooth, expertly 
timed retort, and pretty Anne Helm gave a giggle that wasn't in the script. 
Gordon Douglas, the director of "Pioneer, Go Home," looked pleased. "Leave 
it in," he said. Everything was going just right. 

Then one of the soundstage phones rang. 

A moment later, a studio guard came up to Elvis. "Long distance, Mr. 
Presley." The grin faded from Elvis's face. Tense, strained lines appeared 
around his lips and eyes. "Excuse me," he said to the company, and walked 
to the phone on the rear wall. Members of the crew moved off, tactfully 
busying themselves elsewhere. Arthur O'Connell looked after Elvis in 
surprise. "He looks scared," he said. 

Five minutes passed. Then ten. It was time to shoot the final version 
of the scene. The actors took their places. The cinematographer readied his 
camera Douglas glanced uneasily about. "Where's Elvis?" he said. There 
was a movement in the shadows back of the soundstage. Elvis came toward 
the set In ten minutes, he seemed to have aged as many years. His head 
was held low. The touch of swagger had vanished from his walk. Silently. 

he n'ronneU spok" his lines Anno Helm gave the next cue. They looked at 
Elvis but there was no reaction A moment pnssr.d (Continued on ,mr,c f,2) 



23 



BULLWINKLE: 

THE MOOSE WITH THE MOST 






by 

ROGER BECK 





His eyes may be crossed, but the 
humor shoots straight to the mark ! 



They created them all — but even Bill Scott and Jay 
Ward can be amazed by the zany antics of Bullwinkle J. 
Moose and such pals as Rocket J. Squirrel, Dudley Do- 
Right of the Mounties, the Genius Dog, Boris Badenov. 



■ There's one star this season who is a big jump ahead of his competitors in getting 
laughs from the oft-unrealistic situations of TV comedy— because he's unreal himself: Funny, 
fictitious Bullwinkle J. Moose, who leaped to fame on the popular cartoon series Rocky And 
His Friends and now has star billing on his own Bullwinkle Show each Sunday. 

Real or unreal, it's only natural that the inimitable cross-eyed moose is a veritable fountain of 
funniness. He's the brainchild of the zaniest pair of behind-the-camera laugh-provokers ever 
to hit Hollywood. The general tenor of madness that surrounds everything connected with 
the show was evident at its gala premiere. Everybody who is anybody in the film capital 

received formal, engraved invitations and a pair of tickets to widely separated seats to 

accommodate couples who weren't on speaking terms! As guests arrived at {Continued on page 71) 



The Bullwinkle Show is colorcast over NBC-TV, Sun., 7 P.M. EST, for General Mills, Ideal Toy Corp. and Beech-Nut. 



24 




Gigi was 19, Frank Gallo was 35, when they wed. But it 

isn't the Rolls-Royce — or Frank's success as 

an advertising exec — that impresses Gigi more than her 

own co-starring role in Follow The Sun. It's 

the actual difference in their ages! And their marriage 

has proved to be even better than she dreamed. 



Gigi Perreau, a veteran actress at 20, 
points out the advantages of a May-and- 
Deeember marriage — when you are May! 

by DICK KLEINER 

■ They were wed October 1, 1960, in the same 
church— St. Victor's, Los Angeles — where they had 
first met seventeen months before. The solemn cir- 
cumstance of their introduction is only one reason 
why Gigi Perreau and Frank Gallo believe their 
romance and marriage will last. More significant, of 
course, is the fact that both are Roman Catholic, 
look on divorce with disfavor and consider marriage 
a step to be taken only with the utmost serious- 
ness. . . . There is still another reason, less obvious 
and quite purely personal: Gigi's own dedicated 
search for a certain type to marry — an older man. 
To understand this, you have to understand Gigi. As 
she says, "It was important to my personality to 
marry an older man. Perhaps (Continued on page 58) 



Gigi Perreau is Kattiy Richards in Follow The Sun. seen over 
ABC-TV, Sundays, from 7:30 to 8:30 P.M. EST. as sponsored 
by Kaiser Industries Corp. and Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co. 



26 







J 



w/ 



# V 

■ 







Mike London, the youngest rebel of Bonanza, presents a 
vigorous defense for the wisdom of marrying a mature mate 




by TEX MADDOX 

■ When Dodie and Mike Landon dared to elope, no one but Dodie's 
discerning mother believed they could make a go of their romantic marriage. 
In fact, they wed without his family's knowledge. Mike was nineteen, 
Dodie was six years older — a widow with a seven-year-old son — and his 
parents threatened to stop "the crazy step" if he attempted it. To Mike's 
father and mother and sister, he was maddeningly immature. He had 
already disappointed them by leaving college, by trying to become 
an actor. They felt that he ran away from life's challenges and they 
interpreted his teen-age uncertainty as self-centered nonsense. 

But as Mike recalls those days — and that fateful first meeting: "The 
evening a mutual friend introduced me to Dodie for a double-date at her 
little house, we played chess and laughed. I had such a good time being 
the self I wanted to be, I had to see her the next evening. When I 
told my mother honestly that I had met and liked Dodie, she wasn't at all 
pleased. That night, she telephoned Dodie to send me home instantly 
because I was much too young to be interested in anyone older. 
Dodie cried — but she did just that. She wouldn't (Continued on page 65) 

Michael Landon (pictured on opposite page with his wife Dodie) co-stars as Little Joe 
Cartwright in Bonanza, now colorcast over NRC-TV on Sundays, from 9 to 10 P.M. EST. 
under the sponsorship of the Chevrolet Motor Division of General Motors Corporation. 



29 




ft. 



t» 



1 








Mike London, the youngest rebel of Bonanza, presents a 
vigorous defense for the wisdom of marrying a mature mate 



by TEX MADOOX 

■ When Dodie and Mike Landon dared to elope, no one but Dodie's 
discerning mother believed they could make a go of their romantic marriage. 
In fact, they wed without his family's knowledge. Mike was nineteen, 
Dodie was six years older — a widow with a seven-year-old son — and his 
parents threatened to stop "the crazy step" if he attempted it. To Mike's 
father and mother and sister, he was maddeningly immature. He had 
already disappointed them by leaving college, by trying to become 
an actor. They felt that he ran away from life's challenges and they 
interpreted his teen-age uncertainty as self-centered nonsense. 

But as Mike recalls those days — and that fateful first meeting: "The 
evening a mutual friend introduced me to Dodie for a double-date at her 
little house, we played chess and laughed. I had such a good time being 
the self I wanted to be, I had to see her the next evening. When I 
told my mother honestly that I had met and liked Dodie, she wasn't at all 
pleased. That night, she telephoned Dodie to send me home instantly 
because I was much too young to be interested in anyone older. 
Dodie cried— but she did just that. She wouldn't (Continued on page 65) 



Michael Landon (pictured on opposite page with his wife Dodie) co-stars as Little Joe 
Cartwright in Bonanza, nov. colorcast over NBC-TV on Sundays, from 9 to 10 P.M. EST, 
under the sponsorship of the Chevrolet Motor Dmsion of General Motors Corporation. 



29 



I m 






! 



jfSI 








#^ 





Carol Burnett says: 




AFjjM TO to 



C 




K UW CftWp 



by JI1V1 MORSE 

■ Why don't the ladies want to be comics? Why does creating laughter make the little 
dears so sad? Carol Burnett can tell you why. Almost in the same breath, she can 
tell you why she herself — a most successful lady comic — can state, with all sincerity, "I'm 
the happiest slob in the world!" As Carol explains it: "Unless there are unusual 
circumstances, anyone who is making a living in show business has no right to be unhappy. 
After all, there are no want-ads for actors. If a guy or gal is in show business, it's 
because he or she wants to be. How many people are there who, when they wake 
up in the morning, actually look forward to going to work? Very few — but I'm one of 
them. As long as I can earn a good living by crossing my eyes once a week on television, 
I'd be a real kook if I had complaints!" 

Although the word "kook" pops up frequently in Carol's conversation, she's far from 
being one. When not trying for laughs on stage, on TV's The Garry Moore Show 
or radio's The Carol Burnett — Richard Hayes Show, she is a serious gal with definite 
ideas about her personal life and career. Also — when not making {Continued on page 68) 

The Garry Moore Show is seen on CBS-TV. Tues., 10 P.M. EST. sponsored by Oldsmobile, Johnson's Wax and 
Winston Cigarettes. The Carol Rumen— Richanl Hayes Show is heard over CBS Radio. M-F. 7:10 P.M. EST. 



31 




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BIGGEST TOURIST ATTRACTION 



The lights may twinkle and the stars shine at 
"Sunset & Vine,' 9 but it's Lawrence Welk and 
his champagne cohorts at the Palladium who 
get the play when travelers visit glamourland 



'>llyuood\ 



by MARILYN BECK 

• Hollywood is famous for many things. It has the movie and 
TV industries and their stars; glamorous night clubs; unusual 
structures such as the Capitol Records building (shaped like 
a stack of discs) ; cultural centers such as the Hollywood Bowl; 
dozens of other attractions which long have made the film 
capital a prime tourist target. 

And now Hollywood has a new lure for out-of-town visitors: 
Lawrence Welk! Since he moved his Champagne Music Makers 
from' the Aragon Ballroom in Santa Monica to the redecorated 
Hollywood Palladium in the heart of (Continued on page 61) 



The Lawrence Welk Show is seen on ABC-TV, Sat., from 9 to 10 P.M. 
EST, sponsored by J. B. Williams, Union Carbide, and Polaroid. For 
Welk programs heard on ABC Radio, check newspapers in your area. 



zl 






* 



i 



i 



LAWRENCE WELX 

AND MIS CHAMPAGNE MUSIC 



Welk looks at the lights and says: "It's a long way from North Dakota!" But many in the vast crowds travel even farther — to 
see the former farmboy, his musicians and singers (such as Norma Zimmer, pictured with the maestro on the opposite page). 






vt, 



jSE «m>AS« 







X^ 



,£*&*• 








m 



A mpssagp of self-assurance from Joan Harvey, 

the entrancing Judy Gibson of The Edge Of Night 




Joan finds sympathy and understanding on The Edge Of Night, with Mandel 
Kramer playing her father, Bill Marceau, and Larry Hagman as her husband Ed Gibson. 



iiv ntA\ri:s KISII 



■ Behind a facade of poise is an innate shyness Joan Harvey has never quite 
overcome. But she believes shyness isn't necessarily a handicap. "If you are 
truly shy — and not pretending— not everyone will overlook you," she says. 
"Sometimes it makes people try harder to help." This has happened to Joan from 
her earliest job-hunting days in Hollywood to her present role as Judy Marceau 
Gibson on the CBS serial drama, The Edge Oj Night. It's true that doors didn't 
spring wide for her in the film capital during the ages of seventeen to 
twenty-one, when she wanted so desperately to become (Continued on page 70) 

The Edge Oj Sight. CBS-TV, M-F. 4:30 to 5 P.M. F.ST, is sponsored by Procter & Gamble and other*. 



.35 




A message of self-assurance f rom I 

,rom Joan Harvey 
the entrancing J udy ^ . ' 

0/ ™ e *%e O/ Affefct 




Joan finds sympathy and understanding on The Edge Of Night, with Mandel 
Kramer playing her father, Bill Marceau, and Larry Hagman as her husband Ed Gibson 



by FRANCES KISII 



■ Behind a facade of poise is an innate shyness Joan Harvey has never quite 
overcome. But she believes shyness isn't necessarily a handicap. "If you are 
truly shy— and not pretending— not everyone will overlook you," she says. 
"Sometimes it makes people try harder to help." This has happened to Joan from 
her earliest job-hunting days in Hollywood to her present role as Judy Marceau 
Gibson on the CBS serial drama, The Edge Of Night. Its true that doors didn't 
spring wide for her in the film capital during the ages of seventeen to 
twenty-one, when she wanted so d esperately to become (CcmUnued on page 70) 

The FJ g e Of Night, CBS-TV, M-F. 1:30 to 5 P.M. FM ■ i« sponsored b, Pro, In S Gamble and ra. 



.15 



TV RADIO MIRROR'S NEW FACE OF THE MONTH 



Robert Goulet 




He sings like an angel. 

He has just enough of 

the devil in his eyes. 

He's a Broadway star . . . 

He's also modest! 

by JAMES TAYLOR 



Despite what he says, Goulet is billed as very much a star on 
"The Enchanted Nutcracker," big ABC-TV musical special. 



■ "When did I first realize that I'd become a star?" repeated Robert Goulet. "I'm 
not sure that I know what a star really is, or what it means to be one. The 
word is much over-used. . . . Just because an actor plays the principal role in 
a weekly Western series on television, that doesn't necessarily make him a 
star, although he may like to think of himself as being one. I know of an actor 
who played bit roles in a couple of TV dramas and had a better part in a 
commercial. Then he went on the road in a play and was billed as a television 
star! . . . Although I have hopes, I'm not a star. Not yet, anyway. Oh, people 
recognize me on the street and in restaurants. And I'm beginning to get 
a lot of fan mail. But that doesn't mean I'm a star. It simply means that people 
recognize me from seeing me on television or the stage. ... To my way of 
thinking, the real honest-to-goodness stars are performers (Continued on page 55) 

The Enchanted Nutcracker." ABC-TV, Sat., Dec. 23. from 10 to 11 P.M. EST, is sponsored by Westinghouse Electric Corp. 



36 



I 



TV RADIO MIRROR'S MEWFAC^OTJJWMONTH 



Robert Goulet 




He sings like an angel. 

He has just enough of 

the devil in his eyes. 

He's a Broadway star . . . 

He's also modest! 

by JAMES TAYLOR 



Despite what he says, Goulet is billed as very much a star on 
"The Enchanted Nutcracker," big ABC-TV musical special. 



■ "When did I first realize that I'd become a star?" repeated Robert Goulet. "I'm 
not sure that I know what a star really is, or what it means to be one. The 
word is much over-used. . . . Just because an actor plays the principal role in 
a weekly Western series on television, that doesn't necessarily make him a 
star, although he may like to think of himself as being one. I know of an actor 
who played bit roles in a couple of TV dramas and had a better part in a 
commercial. Then he went on the road in a play and was billed as a television 
star! . . . Although I have hopes, I'm not a star. Not yet, anyway. Oh, people 
recognize me on the street and in restaurants. And I'm beginning to get 
a lot of fan mail. But that doesn't mean I'm a star. It simply means that people 
recognize me from seeing me on television or the stage. To my way of 

thinking, the real honest-to-goodness stars are performers (Continued on page 55) 



"The Enchanted Nutcrarker." ABC-TV, Sat., Dec. 23. from 10 to 11 PM EST is mm .„„j i, w .- l m • r~ 

i« .in. loi, is sponsored by Westinghouse Electric Corp. 



36 








Carneyand Barbara Cook start 

"Fads and Foibles" rolling 

with tintype pose of yesteryear. 



Art Carney acts as genial 
guide through a hundred 
years of America's 
whackiest enthusiasms 



■ Later this month, NBC's talented 
Special Project group will delight 
America's TV viewers with an hour- 
long show called "Fads and Foibles." 
Written and produced by William 
Nichols, with a score by Robert 
Russell Bennett, this musical tour 
through the history of the last cen- 
tury will cast a smiling eye on some 
of this country's zaniest enthusiasms. 
Narrator Art Carney will be joined 
by Barbara Cook, Alice Ghostley, 
James Hurst and Eileen Rodgers for 
a singing-swinging show, blending 
fact with fancy in a top program for 
The Du Pont Show Of The Week. 



TV RADIO MIRROR'S 




AND 




Above: In America — or anywhere — the battle of the 
sexes goes on and on. In this corner, The Vamp, Theda 
Bara, who destroyed every man who wandered into 
her parlor. During the same era, Rudolph Valen- 
tino tamed the ladies and turned them back into 
the soft, compliant creatures Sod intended. 



"Fads and Foibles." seen Sunday. December 17, from 10 to 11 P.M. EST, is an NBC-TV Special Project for The Du Pont Show Of The Week. 



38 



PREVIEW OF THE MONTH 



FOIBLES 





In the 1930s and '40s, people went mad 
about Latin American dances. After a while, 
some of us — including Alice Ghostley — said, 
"That's enough, that's enough, take it back; 
my spine's out of whack! There's a great 
big crack in the back of my sacroiliac!" 






Right: Hollywood and its movies have fostered more 

fads and foibles than any other American institution. 

From Fairbanks to Brando, from Pickford to Monroe, 

Hollywood has set the fads. Here, Eileen Rodgers 

sings the joys of dancing at that "Moving Picture 

Boll," where "Douglas Fairbanks shimmied on one 

hand . . . Mary Pickford did a toe-dance grand." 




!"• 



\\ 



* 

w 



Carney~~and Barbara Cook start 

"Fads and Foibles" rolling 

with tintype pose of yesteryear. 



Art Carney acts as genial 
guide through a hundred 
years of America's 
whackiest enthusiasms 



■ Later this month, NBC's talented 
Special Project group will delight 
America's TV viewers with an hour- 
long show called "Fads and Foibles." 
Written and produced by William 
Nichols, with a score by Robert 
Russell Bennett, this musical tour 
through the history of the last cen- 
tury will cast a smiling eye on some 
of this country's zaniest enthusiasms. 
Narrator Art Carney will be joined 
by Barbara Cook, Alice Ghostley, 
James Hurst and Eileen Rodgers for 
a singing-swinging show, blending 
fact with fancy in a top program for 
The Du Pont Shouy Oj The Week. 



TV RADIO MIRROR , BEV1EW p, THE MO NTH 



FADS and 



FOIBLES 





In the 1930s and '40s, people went mad 
about Latin American dances. After a while, 
some of us — including Alice Ghostley — said, 
"That's enough, that's enough, take it back; 
my spine's out of whack! There's a great 
big crack in the back of my sacroiliac!" 



Above: In Amenca-or anywhere— the battle of the 

Bo?n T T ? nd °?' ' n +his corner ' The Vam P. Thed ° 
her nnrf l 6 ^ ^ ever V ™>n who wandered into 

inoW A^"?V Ue S ° me era ' Rudol Ph Valen- 
no tomed the ladies and turned them back into 
the soft, compl.ont creatures God intended 



"Fads and Foibles." seen Sunday. December 17, from 10 to 11 P.M. EST is 



an NBC-TV S 



P<-Hal Project for The Du Pom Show 0\ The Week. 



Right: Hollywood and its movies have fostered more 

fads and foibles than any other American institution. 

From Fairbanks to Brando, from Pickford to Monroe, 

Hollywood has set the fads. Here, Eileen Rodgers 

sings the joys of dancing at that "Moving Picture 

Ball." where "Douglas Fairbanks shimmied on one 

hand . . . Mary Pickford did a toe-dance grand." 





When Home Sweet Home grew too confining, there was the corner bar to restore masculine spirits. 
Art Carney and cohorts sing, "If a pair of blue eyes have deceived you, and a pair of red lips said 
you nay, don't appeal to champagne, all its bubbles are vain, you will only feel worse the next day." 



"Temperance" was the battle word. Pamphlets, 
pictures, songs and plays showed that man's 
first drink was his first step on the road to 
hell. Barbara Cook sings one of the most pop- 
ular songs of the day, "Father, dear father, 
come home with me now! The clock in the 
steeple strikes two . . . Oh, who could resist 
the most plaintive of prayers? . . . Come home!" 




But such goings-on in the corner saloon so enraged 
a militant character named Carry Nation that she organized 
a posse of hatchet-women who passed through Kansas like 
a cyclone, leaving a train of wrecked saloons behind them. 



40 



J 




FADS and foibles 



Mother isn't a fad and she isn't exactly a foible, 
but for many years there was a fad for "mother" 
songs. James Hurst sings the best-known of 
them all, "M is for the million things she gave 
me," and so on to the end: "Put them all together 
they spell 'Mother,' a word that means the world to me. 




One of the dance fads, 

coupled with Prohibition, 

inspired Irving Berlin's 

good-humored complaint, 

interpreted here by 

Eileen Rodgers. " Tis a sad, 

sad day for me, this day 

of lemonade and tea. For 

now my dancing aspirations 

haven't got a chance . . . 

You cannot make your 

shimmy shake on tea." 



And during the '50s, we 

had: Hula hoops, Liberace, 

panty raids, the sack 

dress, Bermuda shorts, 

beatniks, the motorcycle 

boy. Ladies and gentlemen, 

from the far-out fifties 

— Elvis Presley 

and rock V roll. 



41 




When Home Sweet Home grew too confining, there was the corner bar to restore masculine spirits. 
Art Carney and cohorts sing, "If a pair of blue eyes have deceived you, and a pair of red lips said 
you nay, don't appeal to champagne, all its bubbles are vain, you will only feel worse the next day." 



"Temperance" was the battle word. Pamphlets, 
pictures, songs and plays showed that man's 
first drink was his first step on the road to 
hell. Barbara Cook sings one of the most pop- 
ular songs of the day, "Father, dear father, 
come home with me now! The clock in the 
steeple strikes two ... Oh, who could resist 
the most plaintive of prayers? . . . Come home! 




But such goings-on in the corner saloon so enraged 
a militant character named Carry Nation that she organized 
a posse of hatchet-women who passed through Kansas like 
a cyclone, leaving a train of wrecked saloons behind them 



40 




'Hmj*m and 



FOIBLES 




Mother isn't a fad and she isn't exactly a foible, 
but for many years there was a fad for "mother" 
songs. James Hurst sings the best-known of 
them all, "M is for the million things she gave 
me," and so on to the end: "Put them oil together 
they spell 'Mother,' a word that means the world to me.' 








1 T^^^i' 1 ~"3^H 






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Yfc* ^: - 




y " ^Hrffc 




fill- : 1 m. Jt 














. 


^r^^H 





One of the dance fads, 

coupled with Prohibition, 

inspired Irving Berlin's 

good-humored complaint, 

interpreted here by 

Eileen Rodgers. " 'Tis a sad, 

sad day for me, this day 

of lemonade and tea. For 

now my dancing aspirations 

haven't got a chance . . . 

You cannot make your 

shimmy shake on tea." 



And during the '50s, we 

had: Hula hoops, Liberace, 

panty raids, the sack 

dress, Bermuda shorts, 

beatniks, the motorcycle 

boy. Ladies and gentlemen, 

from the far-out fifties 

— Elvis Presley 

and rock V roll. 



41 



■ The beautiful bride and the handsome 
groom sat at the bridal table holding 
hands. Around them, in the Four Arts 
Club, more than 350 guests at the wed- 
ding reception milled and chattered. But 
Melanie Adams Como, the bride of just 
a few hours, and Ronald Pierino Como, 
the proud groom, were unaware of the 
noisy crowd. Their intertwined fingers, 
their shining eyes and whispered words 
set them aside in a world of their own. 

Suddenly, there was a stir among the 
guests and a man stepped forward. He 
stood in front of the bride and groom, 
poured champagne into a glass, and pro- 
posed a toast to the newlyweds' future 
happiness. 

Melanie and Ronald came out of their 
private dream world and looked up. 

Something was wrong . . . this wasn't 
the best man, who traditionally made the 
first toast. And the father of the groom — 
where was he on this most important 
night of his son's life? 

Nowhere to be seen. The best man and 
the father of the groom were both miss- 
ing. 

Now the gossip, which had begun that 
afternoon during the marriage ceremony 
itself, started again: "See, the father does 
disapprove of the marriage. He hardly 
waited until the wedding was over before 
he and his other son skipped out." . . . 
"The mother didn't show up at all. 
Claimed she was sick. Convenient, eh? I 
bet there'd be quite a story if we knew 
the real reasons why Mrs. Perry Como 
didn't attend her own son's wedding." 
. . . "Perry Como went to the ceremony 
in a brown business suit. I know he's a 
relaxed guy — but a business suit at a 
formal wedding! How casual can you 
get?" . . . "Hear that Ronnie's father and 
mother burned up the wires, when they 
heard their son (Continued on page 59) 




\ 




42 





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43 



■ The beautiful bride and the handsome 
groom sat at the bridal table holding 
hands. Around them, in the Four Arts 
Club, more than 350 guests at the wed- 
ding reception milled and chattered. But 
Melanie Adams Como, the bride of just 
a few hours, and Ronald Pierino Como, 
the proud groom, were unaware of the 
noisy crowd. Their intertwined fingers, 
their shining eyes and whispered words 
set them aside in a world of their own. 

Suddenly, there was a stir among the 
guests and a man stepped forward. He 
stood in front of the bride and groom, 
poured champagne into a glass, and pro- 
posed a toast to the newlyweds' future 
happiness. 

Melanie and Ronald came out of their 
private dream world and looked up. 

Something was wrong . . . this wasn't 
the best man, who traditionally made the 
first toast. And the father of the groom- 
where was he on this most important 
night of his son's life? 

Nowhere to be seen. The best man and 
the father of the groom were both miss- 
ing. 

Now the gossip, which had begun that 
afternoon during the marriage ceremony 
itself, started again: "See, the father does 
disapprove of the marriage. He hardly 
waited until the wedding was over before 
he and his other son skipped out." . . . 
"The mother didn't show up at all. 
Claimed she was sick. Convenient, eh? I 
bet there'd be quite a story if we knew 
the real reasons why Mrs. Perry Como 
didn't attend her own son's wedding." 
. . . "Perry Como went to the ceremony 
in a brown business suit. I know he's a 
relaxed guy — but a business suit at a 
formal wedding! How casual can you 
get?" . . . "Hear that Ronnie's father and 
mother burned up the wires, when they 
heard their son (Continued on page 59) 




/tfAr/mfM 




43 





Meet the 



The Addisons of Mister Ed: Larry Keating, who 

was once "neighbor" to Burns & Allen; Edna Skinner, 

former film star who came out of retirement 

to "live next door" to Alan Young's talking horse. 



For five years, these boon companions of the Nelsons (left) 
have added spice to The Adventures Of Ossie And Harriet: 
Movie veteran Lyle Talbot, as Joe Randolph; Mary Jane 
Croft — also known as TV voice of basset hound "Cleo"! — as Clara. 





Mina Kolb helps Cara Williams prove two head 



■ Good fences may make good neighbors, 
as Robert Frost's farmer said. But TV 
writers find many a bonus in tearing those 
fences down, let neighbors swarm as they 
may! . . . What would I Love Lucy have 
been without those lovable pop-ins, Fred 
and Ethel Mertz (as played by Bill Fraw- 
ley and Vivian Vance)? Certainly, Jackie 
Gleason's The Honey mooners would have 
been only half as funny without their pals 
Ed and Trixie Norton (Art Carney and 
Joyce Randolph). It seems as though — 
like double dates in real life — foursomes 
are more fun in television. ... In fact, some 
TV "neighbors" have become so popular 



Neighbors 





As Flora and George, they add to the feudin', 
fussin' and fun on The Real McCoys: Madge Blake, 
who started acting after her sons were grown; 
Andy Clyde, who was a Keystone Cop in silent films. 



Most harassed neighbors of all are the childless couple who 

live next door to Dennis The Menace (Jay North) and his parents 

(Herbert Anderson and Gloria Henry, both at left below): The 

Mitchells — as played by Sylvia Field and Joseph Kearns (at right). 



i "wetter" than one, on Pete And Gladysl 



with fans that they got shows of their 
own . . . like Harry Morgan, the Pete 
Porter of December Bride, who now stars 
as the same character in Pete And Gladys. 
Wife Gladys — never seen in the earlier 
series, but plenty talked-about — came to 
life in the pretty person of Cara Williams. 
And now their show has added its own 
pair of neighbors! . . . Even "loner" Dale 
Robertson has signed on a trio of ladies 
who can run from their ranch next door 
to borrow sugar — and bring a feminine 
touch to his Tales Of Wells Fargo. Yes, 
it's neighbors, neighbors everywhere . . . 
without them, many a show would sink. 











Meet the 



The Addisons of Mister lid: Lorry Keating, who 

was once "neighbor" to Burns & Allen; Edna Skinner, 

■former film star who came out of retirement 

to "live next door" to Alan Young's talking horse. 



For five years, these boon companions of the Nelsons (left) 
have added spice to The Adventures Of Ozzxe And Harriet: 
Movie veteran Lyle Talbot, as Joe Randolph: Mary Jane 
Croft — also known as TV voice of basset hound "Geo"! — as Clara. 





Mina Kolb helps Cara Wi 



■ Good fences may make good neighbors, 
as Robert Frost's farmer said. But TV 
writers find many a bonus in tearing those 
fences down, let neighbors swarm as they 
may! . . . What would I Love Lucy have 
been without those lovable pop-ins, Fred 
and Ethel Mertz (as played by Bill Fraw- 
ley and Vivian Vance) ? Certainly, Jackie 
Gleason's The Honeymooners would have 
been only half as funny without their pa's 
Ed and Trixie Norton (Art Carney and 
Joyce Randolph). It seems as though- 
like double dates in real life— foursomes 
are more fun in television. ... In fact, some 
TV "neighbors" have become so popul 8 ' 



1 



on Pete And Gladys 1 . 



with fans that they got shows of their 
own . . . like Harry Morgan, the Pete 
Porter of December Bride, who now stars 
as the same character in Pete And Gladys. 
Wife Gladys — never seen in the earlier 
series, but plenty talked-about — came to 
life in the pretty person of Cara Williams. 
And now their show has added its own 
Pair of neighbors! . . . Even "loner" Dale 
Robertson has signed on a trio of ladies 
who can run from their ranch next door 
to borrow sugar — and bring a feminine 
touch to his Tales Of Wells Fargo. Yes, 
«s neighbors, neighbors everywhere . . ■ 
without them, many a show would sink. 




As Flora and George, they add to the feudin', 
fussin' and fun on The Real McCoys: Madge Blake, 
who started acting after her sons were grown; 
Andy Clyde, who was a Keystone Cop in silent films. 



Most harassed neighbors of all are the childless couple who 

live next door to Dennis The Menace (Jay North) and his parents 

(Herbert Anderson and Gloria Henry, both at left below): The 

Mitchells — as played by Sylvia Field and Joseph Kearns (at right). 





Joey and son Lorry, 14, find California 
weather is great for playing backyard catch, 
the year around. And that sunshine's just 
fine for taking family pictures with Sylvia! 





Sparring partner is Joey's old friend Charlie 
Faffif, known to boxing as "Young Charlie Zivic." 



■ No doubt the sad-eyed comic felt a pang, 
moving West for The Joey Bishop Show. It was 
hard to leave the old home in Englewood, 
New Jersey — near the golf club he owned with 
pals Buddy Hackett, Phil Foster and Dick 
Shawn . . . hard to leave the Jack Paar gang, 
where he'd won TV fame and friends. But out 
West there were buddies, too . . . like Sinatra, 
who'd given his career such a boost . . . and brother 
Morris, already a manufacturer there. And Joey's 
used to traveling Coast to Coast, as a top 
night-club "draw." Best of all . . . though settling 
down to a series meant a gamble . . . he'd have 
more time to live at home, eat with the family, 
play games with his son. As the camera proves, 
the Bishops are all mighty glad they came! 



Below: Helping Larry rock his dad's boat is 
Joey's older brother, Morris Gottlieb. At right: 
Full-dress (?) portrait of Joey Bishop, his 
wife Sylvia, their son Larry and his dog "Winkie." 





The Joey Bishop Show, NBC-TV, 
Wed., 8:30 P.M. EST, is spon- 
sored by Procter & Gamble and 
the American Tobarco Company. 



46 






THE 
TRANSCONTINENTAL 

BISHOPS 




From home in New Jersey, Joey and his family transferred to sunny Beverly Hills 
when his new TV series went into production. Looks like the good life, doesn't it? 

Continued 



47 




Joey and son Larry, 14, find California 
weather is great for playing backyard catch 
the year around. Ana that sunshine's just 
fine for talcing family pictures with Sylvial 




The /oev Bishop Show, NBC-TV, 
Wed., 8:30 P.M. EST, is spon- 
sored by Procter & Gamble and 
the American Tobacco Company. 




Sparring partner is Joey's old friend Charlie 
Faffif, known to boxing as "Young Charlie Zivic. 



■ No doubt the sad-eyed comic felt a pang, 
moving West for The Joey Bishop Show. It was 
hard to leave the old home in Englewood, 
New Jersey— near the golf club he owned with 
pals Buddy Hackett, Phil Foster and Dick 
Shawn . . . hard to leave the Jack Paar gang, 
where he'd won TV fame and friends. But out 
West there were buddies, too . . . like Sinatra, 
who'd given his career such a boost . . . and brother 
Morris, already a manufacturer there. And Joey's 
used to traveling Coast to Coast, as a top 
night-club "draw." Best of all . . . though settling 
down to a series meant a gamble . . . he'd have 
more time to live at home, eat with the family, 
play games with his son. As the camera proves, 
the Bishops are all mighty glad they came! 



Below: Helping Lorry rock his dad's boat is 
Joey's older brother, Morris Gottlieb. At right: 
Full-dress (?) portrait of Joey Bishop, his 
wife Sylvia, their son Larry and his dog "Winkie." 



THE 
TRANSCONTINENTAL 



BISHOPS 



46 





From home in New Jersey, Joey and his family transferred to sunny Beverly Hills 
when his new TV series went into production. Looks like the good life, doesn't ,t? 



t "antlnurd 




Beverly Hills home is new, but tablecloth (below) is old. 
Artist sketched "Bishop Brothers" on first club date in 1939. 




Mel Bishop, of old act, is welcome guest. ("Brothers" were 
no relation and only their driver was really named "Bishop"!) 



THE 
TRANSCONTINENTAL 

BISHOPS 





Sports outdoors, bare feet and floors indoors — 
the Bishops are taking to California like natives. 







SPECIAL MIDWEST STORIES 






NO TIME 
FOR SLEEP 

Despite a 60-hour work week, 
Richard Hickox of WISH-TV wouldn't 
be happy with any other job 




Richard occasionally finds time to work on a do-it- 
yourself project and listen to his hi-fi collection. 




■ Working ten hours a day, six days a week, newscaster 
Richard Hickox of WISH-TV in Indianapolis finds little 
time for sleep — let alone relaxation, friends, family or 
hobbies. "But I wouldn't be happy at any other job," he 
says. "I fully believe I wouldn't be in the business were 
it not for news, for it is the one facet which makes TV 
worth all the criticisms it is constantly getting." . . . Born 
in Medford, Massachusetts, Richard was about to audition 
for a musical group in 1939, but — "the program director 
of WLAW in Lawrence got to me first and asked me if 
I'd consider an announcing job. I took it." . . . Now a pro, 
Richard delivers the news M-F at 6:30 and 11 p.m. and 
on Saturday at 6: 15 and 11 p.m., plus interviewing news 
personalities on his shows. These have included Mme. 
Chiang Kai-shek, SHAPE and NATO officials, Senators 
and Congressmen from all eleven Hoosier districts, nu- 



merous show-biz people, and at least three Presidential 
candidates — although never after they became President. 
... In November, 1960, Richard took a two-week tour of 
France and Germany, as guest of the Seventh Army and 
Seventeenth Air Force. He spent three days in Berlin, 
covering both the East and West sectors. "The trip gave 
me an on-the-spot picture of one of the world's most con- 
troversial trouble spots," he says. . . . He has also done 
several documentaries, including "Peace Is Our Pro- 
fession," "Cuban Report," and "Decade in Europe." . . . 
Despite his full days at WISH, Richard golfs in the 90s, 
pistol-shoots in the high 80s, and enjoys "do it yourself" 
projects. . . . He and his wife Jessie, a former singer on 
radio, have two children: Diane, 14, and Richard Jr., now 
in the Coast Guard. And there's "Laddie," a collie which — 
Richard says — "considers himself a part of the family." 



49 



Li^J 




Via Repertoire Theater, 

on WBBM-TV, local talent 

has been awarded a . . . 






50 







Creative talent in Chicago has 
been offered a new outlet: 
Local television — specifically, 
Repertoire Theatre, a weekly drama 
workshop on WBBM-TV. This 
show features original dramas, 
pantomimists, monologuists and 
dancers, under the supervision of 
executive producer Don Dillion. 
. . . The unusual aspect of Reper- 
toire Theatre is that all talent, 
ranging from actors to writers, must 
be Chicagoans. To attain that goal, 
established Chicago writers and 
promising young scripters — plus 
composers, arrangers and adapters 
of music and musical theater — are 
being encouraged to bring their 
works to WBBM-TV. . . . "We are 
very rich in creative resources, 
having auditioned more than 300 
actors, actresses, singers and as- 
piring comedians," says Dillion. 
"And passing through our studio 
doors have been many writers and 
young people ambitious in the 
fields of music, design and direc- 
tion." . . . Producer Dillion began 
his TV career in Chicago with Sta- 
tion WBKB, and became manager 
of production operations when 
CBS purchased the station in 1953 
and changed the call letters to 
WBBM. In 1958, he left the station 
to become associate producer of 
Playboy's Penthouse, but returned 
in February, 1960, as assistant pro- 
gram director — executive producer. 
. . . Dillion's series is now aired on 
Saturday afternoons from 2 to 2: 30, 
with one major exception — four of 
the 30-minute shows will be ex- 
panded into 60 or 90-minute dra- 
mas early this year. . . . Going 
strong, Repertoire Theatre has pre- 
sented or has in the planning stage: 
"The Decision of Tempy Jones," 
an original drama; Sachio Kane, a 
series of pantomimes; "The Mag- 
nificent Humbug," an original 
drama which is the story of George 
Bernard Shaw; a reading of Shaw's 
"Don Juan in Hell," and the dra- 
matic theme of the Biblical story, 
"Song of Songs," set to music and 

tA showcase indeed! 




Producer Dillion finds it most relaxing to read scripts in his comfortable 
apartment. Below, his charming wife is the subject of his oil painting hobby. 




51 




1-0-0 O'Neill! 




v With way-out antics, Jim keeps the whole staff on the go. 



He's an offbeat deejay who's 

brought his music and mirth 
to Minneapolis and St. Paul 



Jim O'Neill (or James Francis Patrick O'Neill, 
as he's known to his most intimate ac- 
quaintances) joined KDWB Radio last summer, 
and folks of the Twin Cities have been chuckling 
ever since. Why? Because Jim believes the suc- 
cessful performer must always be himself — 
and, since Jim's sense of humor is offbeat and 
tongue-in-cheek, the show merely extends his 
personality. Typical is his daily "little-known 
moments in history" section, saluting such 
figures as: "Glick, the obscure Chinese tinkerer, 
who unknowingly invented the first wheel in 
1088 B.C., but thought he'd invented the first 
pair of skis . . . lived a frustrating life ever 
after, and finally had to invent traction in self- 
defense." ... A native of Casper, Wyoming, Jim 
was graduated from Creighton University in 



52 













Busy Jim enjoys home life with His wife Marjorie and their daughter Kathy, 12. 



Omaha in 1952 with a bachelor's degree in history. 
This four-year span was preceded by two years in 
the Army in the Philippines, where he served with 
Armed Forces Radio Service. . . . Jim thinks he may be one 
of the youngest "starters" in the broadcasting business. 
He was first employed as an announcer in Fremont, 
Nebraska, at the age of 14, for the magnificent sum of 
thirty cents an hour. He claims: "I was hired because of 
my sparkling personality, my innate charm, my native 
ability, and mainly because there was a war on and station 
managers would hire anyone who'd walk, talk, and be 
out of the draft." . . . Between then and now, Jim was on 
the staff of KOWH, in Omaha, from 1949 to 1956 . . . 
program director at KFBI in Wichita ... at WONE in Day- 
ton . . . and went to the West Coast in 1959 to try com- 
bining air work and program management in Stockton, 
California. . . . His present show on KDWB, seen M-F 



from 3 to 6 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., consists 
of the hits of the moment, spiced with best sellers of the 
past. Jim refuses to name any artists or records he dislikes, 
claiming, "I consider commercial radio to be in the business 
of providing what listeners want, and I can't imagine a 
listener caring less about the deejay's personal taste." . . . 
Jim and his wife Marjorie, who met in high school, rent a 
home in St. Paul with their daughter Kathy, a nondescript 
semi-black Labrador dog who likes chocolate cookies, and 
a bob-tailed domestic cat of mixed ancestry. . . . Jim was 
formerly a member of Toastmasters International, and was 
runner-up in the speech contest finals in Washington, D.C., 
in 1954. Also, he is an omnivorous reader, a chess fancier 
("although I haven't won a game in three years") and occa- 
sionally enjoys amateur theater, and local politics. "I used 
to like fencing, too, but I gave it up in a fit of pique when 
I was compared unfavorably with Douglas Fairbanks." 



53 



PEOPLE ARE HIS WORLD 



Eddie Clarke has a formula for success: Surround yourself 
with happy creative heads who will bring out your best 




Returning from Cleveland to work in his 
native Kansas City (below), Eddie now 
sparks the Morning Mayor show on KMBC. 



54 




■ What is the world's greatest asset? 
Eddie Clarke, program manager of 
KMBC Radio, Kansas City, claims 
it is people — and he should know, 
because people are his world. He has 
built a reputation for himself with 
the lives he has influenced and with 
the people who have guided his own 
career. . . . Because his career has 
been so successful, Eddie is con- 
stantly being asked for advice on 
how to break into the broadcasting 
industry. His first suggestion puts 
the emphasis on developing con- 
tacts. "The best place to do that now 
is in a small market, away from a 
metropolitan area," Eddie tells them. 
... A native Kansas Citian, Eddie 
just returned from Cleveland, where 
he was the first public service direc- 
tor in the history of Metropolitan 
WHK. He picks six individuals as 
his greatest and most stimulating 
friends. "These friends have done 
more to influence me than any other 
group, throughout my life. Perhaps 
the strongest of these is Jack Thay- 
er, general manager of WHK. 
Thayer gets along with people be- 
cause he surrounds himself with 
happy and productive creative 
heads who bring out the best in 
him," Eddie says. "I learned, only 
in the past year, that this can be 
the greatest asset a man can have. 
Most of the six started out with 
practically nothing, and today I've 
found that those who follow this 
philosophy end up at the top to 
stay." . . . Happily married, Eddie 
and his wife take special pride in 
his show boxer dog, "Capacrest 
Jockey." The name "Capacrest" 
comes from the famous kennels in 
New Jersey, while the second word 
is a fitting reference to both sports 
and Eddie himself — one of mid- 
America's best-known disc jockeys. 
Often called the nation's original 
"morning mayor," Eddie has a per- 
sonality on and off the air that is 
smooth, yet pert. He smiles with his 
audience, avoids punching any one 
on his Morning Mayor shows. "They 
listen to be acccompanied, and they 
live my show with me," Eddie says. 
"I feel it's my duty to keep them 
satisfied with quality, humility, and 
respect." Perhaps these are the rea- 
sons so many people rely on Eddie 
Clarke to start their day! 






Robert Goulet 

(Continued from page 36) 
like Garbo and Sinatra. It takes a long 
time to reach their status." These re- 
freshing quotes come from a man who 
has received critical acclaim for his 
featured role in Lerner and Loewe's 
Broadway hit "Camelot" and his tele- 
vision appearances on Omnibus and the 
Ed Sullivan and Garry Moore shows. 

Seldom has a new personality arrived 
on the New York scene and been ap- 
plauded so warmly by the skeptical 
circle of critics. Jack O'Brian, syndi- 
cated TV columnist of the New York 
Journal-American, had this to say fol- 
lowing one of Robert Goulet's guest- 
shots on the Sullivan program: "As a 
handsome, virile young singer, Goulet 
is far different from most of the young- 
er stars ... a brand-new handsome, 
robust young singing star with a fine, 
big stage-size voice containing great 
range in its color, timbre and style; he 
should become a r-r-really big star." 

And Variety, the show-business trade 
journal, raved: "Goulet emerged as a 
new TV star in the making with his 
looks, his savvy projection and the 
high-grade quality of his vocalizing." 

Singer-actor Goulet fits the perfect 
image of a matinee idol. He's hand- 
some, very masculine, and his 165 well- 
conditioned pounds are distributed over 
a six-foot frame. Match this with blue 
eyes and a mane of dark brown hair 
and you have a ready target for young 
females. 

"Yes," he admits, "much of my mail 
is from romantically inclined girls, and 
I hope it keeps coming. It won't put me 
in the great-lover class, however. 
Whenever the letters begin influencing 
me to think that I'm a hot-shot, I pick 
up another one that brings me back to 
earth. Like one I received the other 
day: The girl wrote that she was deeply 
in love with me. She complimented my 
singing by saying, 'After all the trash 
we've been forced to listen to, it's won- 
derful to hear a good singer.' Then she 
ended her letter by saying, 'By the way, 
I'm ten years old'!" 

Although Goulet is a new name to 
Broadway and TV audiences, he 
shrinks when anyone refers to him as 
being an overnight success. "Over- 
night, to me," he says, "represented a 
long time. I'm twenty-seven now, and 
I've been singing since I was four. Of 
course, I haven't been a professional all 
that time, but I did get an early start. 

"My father died when I was eleven 
and I never knew him very well, but 
I do remember him telling me that I 
had a God-given talent and not to 
waste it. When I was a boy, he used to 
practically drag me off the baseball 
field for my singing lessons. And then 
came the usual routine of singing in 
churches and in school. Ever since I can 
remember, I knew I was going to be a 



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55 



singer. That's been my one objective. 
Even when I was a kid, I didn't dream 
of being a fireman or a cowboy. I just 
knew I was going to be a singer." 

Goulet was born in Lawrence, Mas- 
sachusetts, and moved to Edmonton, 
Alberta, when he was thirteen. It was 
in Canada, as a teenager, that he be- 
came a professional. "I was hired as a 
radio announcer in Edmonton when I 
was seventeen. Two years later, I went 
to Toronto, where I entered the Con- 
servatory of Music on a scholarship, 
and also worked in radio and television. 

"I'll never forget my debut on TV. It 
was in an opera and, at one point, I 
was supposed to raise my shoulders 
significantly. I was so nervous, I 
couldn't do it. I'm still nervous when- 
ever I perform, but I've learned not to 
show it. After my first appearance on 
The Ed Sullivan Show, two or three of 
the critics wrote that I amazed them by 
appearing so cool in my first major TV 
shot. They said I had the confidence of 
a veteran. 

"Naturally, this pleased me — because 
I wasn't cool, at all. But I've schooled 
myself not to show nervousness. I think 
all performers are nervous. It was 
Helen Hayes, I believe, who said that 
when an actor stops being nervous he 
stops being a good actor." 

He had done several years of summer 
"stock and was in Bermuda, playing his 
first night-club engagement, when he 
received a phone call from a friend, 
actor Don Harron, suggesting that he 
fly to New York to audition for "Came- 
lot." Goulet recalls: "The role was Sir 
Lancelot, the bravest swordsman and 
lady-killer in King Arthur's court — I 
didn't think I had a chance. In fact, I 
treated the whole thing more or less as 
a joke. 

"However, because of Don's urging, 
I did apply for an audition and was told 
to come to New York. At the same time, 
I learned that the producers wanted 
Laurence Harvey for the part, but 
didn't give it to him because he couldn't 
sing. I thought it was a waste of time 
and money for me to audition for a role 
considered important enough for Har- 
vey, but I came to New York, anyway. 
I certainly had a negative attitude when 
I arrived. My plane was late, and that 
didn't make me feel any better. But 
much to my surprise, I got the part!" 

And when he opened in "Camelot" 
last December, the critics pulled out all 
the adjectives at their command. Goulet 
was signed to a long-term contract 
(which continues until October of 
1963), and television offers began pour- 
ing in. 

"Following that first appearance with 

Ed Sullivan," he says, "I went on the 

t Garry Moore show, and then appeared 

" with Edie Adams and Myron Mc- 

Cormick on an Omnibus special tracing 

the history of American music." 

56 



He is signed for fall-winter appear- 
ances on several of the major TV 
variety programs, including return en- 
gagements with Ed Sullivan, and will 
be starred in a musical spectacular in 
December. 

"There's even been talk of my own 
series on TV," Goulet said, "but I don't 
know how I could work it in with my 
'Camelot' schedule. Right now, I'm go- 
ing to concentrate on guest appearances 
and specials." 

Although Goulet had early operatic 
training, he has no ambitions toward 
the opera as such. "My goal," he ex- 
plains, "is to become a fine performer, 
in all the mediums. I hope to keep de- 
veloping as a performer until I'm sixty. 
There is no point where you can say to 
yourself, 'I've learned it all. I can start 
relaxing now, and take things easy.' 

"I believe it's important for a person 
to aim high — to aim at the stars. If you 
aim low with your objectives, you'll 
never achieve anything. And, once you 
achieve one goal, you should immedi- 
ately put that in the past and set an- 



Statement required by the Act of August 24, 
1912 as amended by the Acts of March 3, 1933, 
July 2, 1946 and June 11, 1960 (74 Stat. 208) 
showing the ownership, management and circu- 
lation of TV RADIO MIRROR, published monthly 
at New York, N. Y., for October 1, 1961. 

1. The names and addresses of the pub- 
lisher, editor, managing editor, and busi- 
ness managers are: Publisher, Macfadden 
Publications, Inc., 205 East 42nd St., New 
York 17. N. Y.; Editor, Ann Mosher, 205 
East 42nd St., New York 17, N. Y., Managing 
Editor, Teresa Buxton, 205 East 42nd St., 
New York 17, N. Y.; Executive Vice-Presi- 
dent, Frederick A. Klein, 205 East 42nd St., 
New York 17, N. Y. 

2. The owner is: (If owned by a corpora- 
tion, its name and address must be stated 
and also immediately thereunder the names 
and addresses of stockholders owning or 
holding 1 percent or more of total amount 
of stock. If not owned by a corporation, the 
names and addresses of the individual 
owners must be given. If owned by a part- 
nership or other unincorporated firm, its 
name and address, as well as that of each 
individual member, must be given.) Mac- 
fadden Publications, Inc., 205 East 42nd St., 
New York 17, N. Y.; Bartell Broadcasting 
Corp., c/o B. Tannenbaum, 444 Madison 
Avenue, New York 22, N. Y.; Henry Liefer- 
ant, Hotel Franconia, 20 West 72nd Street, 
New York 23, N. Y.; Hillman Periodicals, 
Inc., 535 5th Avenue, New York 17, N. Y.; 
Process Lithographers, Inc., 200 Varick 
Street, New York 14, N. Y. 

3. The known bondholders, mortgagees, 
and other security holders owning or hold- 
ing 1 percent or more of total amount of 
bonds, mortgages, or other securities are: 
(If there are none, so state.) N one - 

4. Paragraphs 2 and 3 include, in cases 
where the stockholder or security holder 
appears upon the books of the company as 
trustee or in any other fiduciary relation, 
the name of the person or corporation for 
whom such trustee is acting; also the state- 
ments in the two paragraphs show the 
affiant's full knowledge and belief as to the 
circumstances and conditions under which 
stockholders and security holders who do 
not appear upon the books of the company 
as trustees, hold stock and securities in a 
capacity other than that of a bona fide 
owner. 

5. The average number of copies of each 
issue of this publication sold or distributed, 
through the mails or otherwise, to paid 
subscribers during the 12 months preceding 
the date shown above was: (This informa- 
tion is required by the act of June 11, 1960, 
to be included in all statements regardless 
of frequency of issue.) 609,548. 

(Signed) FREDERICK A. KLEIN, 
Executive Vice-President 
Sworn to and subscribed before me this 
27th day of September, 1961. 

[SEAL] 

TULLIO MUCELLI, Notary Public 

State of New York No. 03-8045500 

Qualified in Bronx Co. 

Cert. Filed in New York Co. 

Commission Expires March 30, 1962 



other one for the future. That's my 
philosophy. That's what keeps me going 
. . . trying to improve. Otherwise, I'd 
begin sliding downhill. 

"I'd like someday to be a truly great 
performer. And to be recognized as 
such by myself, as well as by the pub- 
lic. That's important. A fellow may be 
able to fool others, but it's difficult to 
fool yourself. 

"Sometimes I think that I was born 
thirty years too late — because I'd have 
loved to have been around during the 
glory days of vaudeville. It must have 
been exciting. Really exciting. And 
vaudeville had great, truly great, per- 
formers. 

"I guess I'll never be able to know 
what it felt like to be a vaudevillian, 
but I am lucky to be associated with 
another exciting medium — television. It 
scares me a little when I consider that, 
in one appearance on a program like Ed 
Sullivan's or Garry Moore's, I'm seen 
by more people than will see 'Camelot' 
in a year. But I'll always be grateful 
for my big break in 'Camelot' because 
it has been responsible for my TV ap- 
pearances." 

Goulet and his wife, Louise, are sep- 
arated, and he lives in a bachelor 
apartment near Manhattan's Central 
Park. "Louise and I are good friends, 
but the marriage just didn't work out. 
I suppose that, when you concentrate 
on a career, something has to suffer. 
Show business isn't like any other busi- 
ness. Hours are irregular, and it's im- 
possible to predict what's going to 
happen from day to day. That kind of a 
situation isn't healthy for the average 
marriage." 

Goulet's hobbies are golf ("I shoot in 
the 80s if I cheat a little") and reading 
"I try to read good books. You know, 
non-fiction and classics. I'm trying to 
improve myself all the time — my mind, 
as well as my talent. I believe that a 
performer should be a well-rounded 
individual. The more I understand 
about life, the more I'll understand my- 
self. 

"I've had a lot of help in this respect 
from my mother, Jeanette, and my 
stepfather, Paul Beaupre, who live in 
Bakersfield, California. My sister, 
Claire, has also been a strong influence 
on me. There is so much in life which 
is cheap and shoddy, that close family 
ties are extremely important. 

"Right now, I have a terrific chal- 
lenge — trying to live up to the expecta- 
tions of the critics. Their praise has 
been extremely flattering, but it has put 
me on a spot. If I should fail, I'd not 
only be letting myself down but those 
who boosted me from nowhere to some- 
where. That's why I'm working so hard 
to improve . . . and to keep improving. 

"And someday, perhaps, if I keep im- 
proving, I'll be able to tell you what it 
feels like to be a star." 



What's New on the East Coast 



(Continued from page 5) 



say, is blushing over a French doll. 
. . . Cheers for Bell & Howell. They 
refuse to censor or interfere with the 
contents of their sponsored programs. 
. . . Look for a Warner Bros, build-up 
of Bronwyn FitzSimons. Who she? 
Maureen O'Hara's seventeen-year-old 
daughter. . . . You'd think Joan Craw- 
ford and Perry Como were trying to 
work out a disarmament plan, they're 
having so much trouble setting a date 
for her appearance on the show. 

Santa Says: Did you know that 
Laramie is the highest rated show — 
in Japan? . . . Comedian Gary Morton 
and Lucille Ball will exchange Christ- 
mas gifts. . . . Bob Hope's first special 
of the season, December 13, NBC-TV, 
will cost Revlon $575,000. Probably 
worth it — of the five top-rated specials 
last season, three were Hope's. Bob's 
big guest star will be James Garner. 
. . . Gardner McKay hoisting sails with 
Leslie Parrish. . . . Paul Anka sent 
enough money back to Canada to buy 
an Ottawa TV station. . . . On Christ- 
mas Eve, Donna Reed must feel very 
thankful with her family and her suc- 
cess. As a girl, she worked her way 
through college washing dishes. . . . 
Jack Le Vien — who set up the success- 
ful Winston Churchill series, The Val- 
iant Years — has come up with another 
scoop. The Duke of Windsor has agreed 
to let Le Vien televise his life story. 
. . . Garry Moore and Carol Burnett 
want a sponsor to back a special TV 
adaptation of "Once Upon a Mattress," 
the Broadway musical that boosted 
Carol to stardom. . . . Tom Poston 
recommends that henpecked husbands 
turn off the sound on their TV receiv- 
ers. He says there's no greater satis- 
faction than watching a woman moving 
her lips in complete silence. 

Female Dobie Hickman: Cynthia 
Pepper, full of ginger, slipped into 
N.Y.C. to talk about Margie, her ABC- 
TV series. "Being a kind of female 
Dwayne Hickman is more fun than 
work. And acting seventeen is no prob- 
lem. With the right clothes and mood, 
I can be fourteen, seventeen or twenty - 
one." She's just past twenty. 

Looking Ahead: Among expected 
casualties, after first of the year, are 
the strong-arm programs, The New 
Breed, The Corruptors, 87th Precinct, 
Cain's Hundred, etc. . . . Father Of 
The Bride going fine. Already in eight 
foreign markets. . . . Chicago attorney 
for the Al Capone estate threatening 
to sue The Untouchables. . . . Compe- 
tition coming up for Mitch Miller? NBC 
has already contracted Meredith Will- 
son, composer of "The Music Man," to 
do an hour-long weekly show begin- 
ning in the fall of '62. . . . Bing Crosby 




Christmas gift from ABC-TV will be "The Enchanted Nutcracker," featuring 
youthful Linda Canby and Carol Lawrence of Broadway's "West Side Story." 



co-stars with London's Big Ben on 
December 11, via ABC-TV. His Christ- 
mas show was taped along the Thames. 
. . . And, for the nostalgic, NBC-TV 
on Christmas Eve presents "The Un- 
forgettables," starring Fred Waring and 
his band in a cavalcade of his hits. . . . 
Route 66 fell in love with Baltimore 
and did three — instead of one episode — 
out of the city. . . . Jimmy Dean's hit 
record has TV execs interested in him 
again. . . . Shari Lewis has a honey 
of an idea for a special. She wants to 
gather together the world's most fa- 
mous puppeteers in ninety minutes of 
fun. . . . Dennis James returns to TV 
as an emcee with the golf series, Meet 
The Pros. . . . Victory At Sea, all about 
our naval war with Japan, has just 
begun to be televised in Tokyo. 

Missile Toes: CBS -TV developing 
an eye for pulchritude. Negotiating for 
exclusive rights to televise future Miss 
Teen Age and Mrs. America compe- 
titions. . . . Stan Freberg promises 
something exciting in February. Set to 



star in a comedy special with ABC -TV. 
Billy May will be there, too. . . . Barry 
Sullivan may reconcile with his ex- 
wife, Rita Hall. . . . The Bell Telephone 
Hour bows to the Westerns December 
8 and features Roy Rogers, Dale Evans 
—and Trigger? . . . Afterthought: The 
first televised World Series cost $100,- 
000. That was in 1946. This year's TV 
budget went over $4 million. . . . Dodie 
Stevens has grown into such a beau- 
tiful gal. Ought to see more of her on 
TV. . . . Not so much talk about pay- 
TV these days, but Paramount Pictures 
has stepped up its experiments in Tor- 
onto at a weekly cost of $11,000. . . . 
The Ritz Brothers hope to give The 
Three Stooges competition next season 
on TV. . . . Peter Brown pulled a 
switch-blade knife from his pocket in 
a dramatic sequence and slashed him- 
self to the extent of seven stitches. . . . 
Liberace giving piano lessons to Hope T 
Hampton? . . . Stu Erwin, who headed v 
up one of TV's most successful comedy 
"father" series, is now a grandfather. 

57 



"Why I Married an Older Man" 



(Continued from page 26) 
other girls would feel differently, but I 
needed an older man." Gigi Perreau 
was nineteen and Frank Gallo was 
thirty -five when they were married. 
Yet — although she's only twenty now — 
Gigi has already had an eighteen-year 
acting career. 

She was only two when she made her 
movie debut, toddling on the set of 
"Madame Curie" for a brief role as a 
baby. Since then, she has been a busy 
girl, working in dozens of movies and 
television shows until today she is one 
of the stars of Follow The Sun. 

Throughout her childhood, there were 
really two Gigis. There was, first and 
perhaps foremost, the ordinary girl. 
Her parents jealously guarded Gigi's 
precious childhood, insisted that she at- 
tend ordinary schools (parochial, of 
course) and meet and play with or- 
dinary children. And her father, who 
is French and has the European attitude 
toward the child-parent relationship, 
made sure that Gigi's professional ca- 
reer didn't turn her head. "They would 
slap me down when I needed it," she 
says. "I didn't miss a thing in my child- 
hood and I have no regrets." 

That was one side of Gigi Perreau — 
the average child. But there was an- 
other Gigi, too — the young actress, 
mingling with the greats of Hollywood 
on almost equal terms. She was natur- 
ally thrown into the company of adults 
much more than most children. And 
she liked it. "As a child, I always pre- 
ferred the company of older people. 
I had many friends my own age from 
school, of course, but I much preferred 
the times when I was with adults." 

When her parents entertained, Gigi 
would "stick my nose in," converse with 



T 

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R 

58 



them in ways that frequently astonished 
them. At the various studios where she 
worked, she hobnobbed with the crews 
and her fellow actors. Always it was 
older people she considered her closest 
friends. 

And so it was perhaps only natural 
that she translated this into dating 
terms when the time came: "I was al- 
ways more comfortable and at ease 
with boys older than I was." She dated 
some boys her own age when she was 
fifteen and sixteen. But her first serious 
romance, at eighteen, was with a twen- 
ty-four-year-old second assistant di- 
rector. At that age, a difference of 
six years is sizable. 

"I decided that I needed the security 
of an older person around," she says. 
"With others, it might be different. But, 
for my type of personality and char- 
acter, I definitely needed the feeling of 
strength and experience that older men 
had." She has always felt that it might 
be a good idea for most girls if they 
married older men and thought that 
very few "high-school couples" know 
enough about life to make a go of 
marriage. 

And so, when she met Frank Gallo — 
handsome and still in his early thirties, 
but then almost twice her age — she was 
immediately attracted to him. He was 
"an older man" and she felt comfortable 
and secure in his company. There were 
other, more practical factors which ap- 
pealed to her, too: They were of the 
same religious faith, they enjoyed many 
of the same things. And there was that 
indefinite something which soon be- 
came defined as love. 

A year after they met, they became 
engaged. Five months later, they were 
married. And thus Ghislaine Elizabeth 
Marie Therese Perreau-Saussine be- 




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came Mrs. Frank Gallo. (Incidentally, 
since "Ghislaine" is pronounced with 
a hard G — as in "good" — Gigi pro- 
nounces her nickname that way, too.) 

There have been the usual problems 
of adjusting to marriage. But, happily, 
there are no financial problems. Frank 
is advertising manager of the Schick 
Safety Razor Company, so his income 
is eminently satisfactory — sufficient for 
him to give his bride a Rolls-Royce as 
a wedding present. 

One of the more unusual problems 
the two faced after their marriage was 
Gigi's inability to wash dishes. It seems 
that her home had always been 
equipped with an automatic dishwasher, 
and she simply had never had to do the 
job with such primitive tools as water, 
soap and dishcloths. Frank actually had 
to teach her how to wash dishes by 
hand. 

She also had to learn how to cook. 
She had done some baking before her 
marriage, so that was no problem. But 
she had never cooked complete meals. 
So far, she enjoys it. And, except for 
one fiasco, she's been quite successful. 
The fiasco? Well, she'd been doing 
quite well and Frank was proud of her. 
But he said the big test would be when 
she first attempted his favorite Italian 
dish, chicken cacciatore. 

One brave day, Gigi decided to try 
it. She got a recipe, bought a chicken 
and went to work. "While it was cook- 
ing, it smelled delicious. I was sure it 
was going to be a success. When the 
time came to serve it, I stuck my fork 
in the chicken — it was still tough." 

She stalled for a while, tried the 
fork test again — still tough. She stalled 
some more. Eventually, she could stall 
no longer, and served it. It was so tough 
they practically couldn't eat it, though 
Frank diplomatically complimented her 
on the flavor. It turned out, of course, 
that she had merely bought the wrong 
kind of chicken — since then, she's made 
chicken cacciatore several times, and 
with success. 

There's more to marriage than chick- 
en cacciatore and washing dishes, of 
course. Gigi believes that a woman 
should help her husband, if possible. 
She has made it possible. She's always 
present at Frank's company functions, 
lending a touch of glamour to the oc- 
casion. The company has frequent pic- 
nics (they call them "Schick-nics," in 
honor of their product) and Gigi makes 
a point of attending. 

She feels it is a wife's job to be be- 
side her husband whenever such an 
appearance is called for. And she's gone 
further than that. She does research 
projects for Frank. Whenever her own 
acting career takes her around the 
country on personal-appearance tours, 
she goes into drug stores and asks the 



proprietor all about razor blades. It's 
sometimes embarrassing, but Gigi has 
the charm and sophistication to carry 
it off. Often, she'll just go into stores, 
buy her husband's brand of razor blades 
and report back to him on the service. 

For his part, Frank helps Gigi's ca- 
reer by staying out of the way. He 
wants his wife to be happy and her 
happiness seems to be predicated, at 
the moment, on her working. Eventu- 
ally, she hopes to have "tons of chil- 
dren," and that may change her mind. 
But, as for the present time, she thor- 
oughly enjoys her career and fully 
intends to keep it up for several years. 

She would like to do a Broadway 
play. Since marriage comes first, she 



wouldn't even consider working in 
New York if Frank had to stay in Cali- 
fornia. But, fortunately for this dream, 
his job is such that he could move his 
base of operations East without any 
major problem. In fact, his firm's head 
office is in New York now, so a move 
might be forthcoming, anyway. 

It would certainly seem that, for 
Gigi Perreau, having a husband quite a 
few years older than herself is working 
out well! She has a man who gives her 
the security and experience which only 
come from living. But, looking at her 
radiant face and sparkling eyes, it's 
obvious that Gigi has found something 
more than these in marriage — she has 
found love, too. 



Why Mrs. Como Didn't Go to Her Son's Wedding 



(Continued from page 42) 
was going to get married, trying to talk 
him out of it. They said he was too 
young, that he should wait until he 
graduated from college, that he hadn't 
even started in his career yet. But he 
stood pat. Finally, they told him to 
come home to talk the whole thing 
over. But nothing they could say or do 
changed his mind." . . . "The Comos are 
very religious. They object to the fact 
that Melanie's not a Catholic and that 
her mother's remarried." . . . 

What the gossipers ignored was the 
simple fact that the father of the groom 
and his younger son David, Ronnie's 
best man, did attend the wedding. What 
the rumor -mongers didn't take into ac-. 
count was how much Perry wished his 
wife might be there with him and how 
disturbed he was she couldn't come. 
What they were unable to imagine was 
the push of thoughts, emotions and 
memories which must have over- 
whelmed Perry Como as he stood in the 
small chapel at Notre Dame Univer- 
sity's Sacret Heart Church and watched 
his handsome, broad-shouldered son 
and the statuesque, brunette beauty 
exchange rings. ... 

They were both so young. Just kids, 
really. So very young, so unprepared 
for the responsibilities of marriage. 
Sure, they were both legally twenty- 
one. But Ronnie wasn't even through 
with college yet, and Melanie was still 
taking a secretarial course at the Uni- 
versity of Elkhart. 

Okay, they'd known each other a 
couple of years. That helped. But how 
can two kids really get to know each 
other when they're both swamped by 
studies? That geology course Ronnie 
was taking — it was tough. What had 
Melanie herself admitted? "Ronnie 
studies very hard," she'd said. "Most 
of our meetings were Coke dates." 

A first meeting at a party, introduced 
by another Notre Dame student. Steady 
dating for a couple of years. Then the 



decision not to wait, to get married right 
away. "I love her," Ronnie had said. 
Melanie had echoed and expanded on 
his words. "We have been in love a 
long time. I'm crazy about him and so 
is my family." 

His son's bride was beautiful, Perry 
admitted. Not as beautiful as Roselle, 
his own wife — nobody was as beautiful 
as that — but lovely, nevertheless, in her 
bouffant floor-length dress, her face set 
off by a tiara and veil, her arms holding 
white roses. 

And Ronnie, his son . . . tall and 
handsome in his white dinner jacket. 
Dwarfing his other son, David, the best 
man. So tall, so handsome and so very 
young. Maybe it was just that seeing 
Ronnie getting married made him sud- 
denly feel older and less needed. Why, 
once in an interview, he'd indirectly 
admitted as much. "I don't like that," 
he'd said, "when your children grow 
and get ready to move away." 

Yet Ronnie and Melanie were of age, 
old enough to know their own minds 
and feelings and to make their own 
mistakes. What had he told a reporter 
at another time? His exact words: 
"Who am I to carp at teen-age marriage 
with a case history like mine?" Why, 
he'd been younger than Ronnie when 
he met and fell in love with Roselle at 
a wienie roast. And he'd been twenty- 
one, too — exactly twenty-one — when 
he'd asked her to marry him and she'd 
said yes. 

No, it probably wasn't his son's age 
... or the fact that he hadn't finished 
school yet ... or things like that which 
bothered Perry most. It was ... it was 
. . . something sentimental and hard to 
put in words. Memories, perhaps, that 
he didn't want to face. Memories of silly 
things, like incidents he and his son 
had shared together. 

Like Ronnie's cussed and yet admir- 
able independence, the same independ- 
ence that had given him the courage 
to say, "Look, Mom and Dad, I'm in 



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T 
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59 



love. I want to get married." The in- 
dependence that had led him to insist, 
when he was just fourteen, on traveling 
to school alone — from Sands Point to 
midtown Manhattan by train, and then 
on to school by subway. Roselle and 
Perry had been worried about those 
trips, but Ronnie had insisted — and, 
looking back on it now, Ronnie had 
been right. 

When Ronnie had affected sideburns 
and Perry grabbed him and started to 
shave them off, the boy had squealed 
and fought like a soldier. His son had 
lost that battle, but he'd had the last 
word. "Dad, you want to make me one 
of the herd?" he shouted. But Perry 
soothed him by telling him that he'd 
done it "just to keep my hand against 
the day when the big Como bubble 
bursts and I've got to return to the 
barbershop." 

Roselle had also tried her hand at 
cutting Ronnie's hair — with disastrous 
results. The boy had come home from 
military school and told his mother he 
had to have a haircut right away be- 
cause a special inspection had been 
scheduled for the following day. His 
mother said she'd cut his hair . . . she 
had watched his father do it so often 
she knew exactly what to do ... it was 
easy! And she started snipping away. 

The next night, Ronnie called Perry 
into the den. "We had inspection today 
at school and they threw me in the jug 
because I had such a terrible haircut," 
he confided. "I just couldn't squeal on 
Mom. And how could I tell her she's 
an awful barber — just before Christ- 
mas?" 

Sometimes Perry wondered if he was 
too strict with Ronnie. Other times, he 
knew he wasn't strict enough. Like the 
business about his son's piano lessons. 
Ronnie just wouldn't practice, no mat- 
ter how much Perry pleaded, scolded, 
threatened or cajoled. At last, in des- 
peration, he had persuaded Roselle it 
didn't matter — or, rather, tried to per- 
suade her. "If he doesn't want to play 
the piano, let it go," he suggested. "Let 
Ronnie decide what he wants to do." 

In this matter, fatherly advice had 
prevailed. At another time, when 
Ronnie went against their wishes, 
Roselle punished him the same way she 
had done since he was just a small boy, 
by giving him a good spanking. But 
that was the last time! Ronnie was too 
strong, too solid. Her wrist hurt for 
days afterwards. . . . 

Memories of Ronnie acting as his ad- 
vance scout to protect him from mobs: 
"Hey, Pop, let's cut out of here," his son 
would holler. "The natives are getting 
restless.". . . Memories of Ronnie as a 
choir boy at St. Peter's, a singer in em- 
T bryo — and then, overnight, his voice 
| changed and he blew the whole thing. 
. . . Memories of Ronnie catching a 

forty-pound bass when he was just 
60 



fourteen. ... of Ronnie talking him into 
recording a "snappier" song, "Hot Dig- 
gety," which sold more than a million 
copies ... of Ronnie on his first formal 
school prom date, all spiffed up in a 
tuxedo. 

Memories of his son's confusion about 
how Perry made money as a singer. 
"How much money do you make?" 
Ronnie had asked. "Do you make as 
much as Paul's father? He's a carpenter, 
and he makes a hundred dollars a 
week." 

"Well, with taxes and things, I make 
about that," he had answered. "Fine," 
Ronnie smiled, satisfied. 

His favorite memory was an even 
earlier one, when his son had been con- 
fused about just what Perry did in the 
City all day. He couldn't get it straight 
that singing was work. Then, one day, 
he asked if he could have an auto- 
graphed picture. Later, Perry told a 
magazine writer. "That was the biggest 
day in my life." . . . 

Then the day came when Ronnie left 
home to go to Notre Dame. Perry found 
some vague excuse to go long with his 
son to South Bend, Indiana, that first 
time. The truth was, he just couldn't 
beay to have his son leave home. And 
Roselle felt as bad as he did, except 
she hid it better. When they received 
a letter from Ronnie in which he con- 
fessed he missed them very much, 
especially Mom's food, they both knew 
he wasn't so far away, after all. . . . 

Once, when he'd visited his son at 
college, he told Ronnie he would have 
to leave again at eleven the next morn- 
ing. "Look, there's another plane at 
10:30 tomorrow night," Ronnie had said 
firmly. "I'll be finished classes at eleven 
in the morning, and I expect to spend 
the rest of the day with you!" And, 
of course, Perry had been pleased and 
very glad to stay. . . . 

Memories, thoughts and emotions 
running through a father's head and 
heart as he watches his son getting 
married. Reactions and recollections 
which the gossips couldn't imagine, of 
which they were unaware. It was true 
that Perry Como and his son David, 
after posing for wedding pictures fol- 
lowing the ceremony, checked out of 
their motel and flew right back to New 
York. They were not at the reception. 
And it had been all too obvious that 
Roselle, the mother of the groom, did 
not appear at the wedding or the re- 
ception. 

But the other charges the rumor- 
mongers took such delight in repeating 
were completely untrue or grossly dis- 
torted. 

Perry Como and his son David flew 
back to New York right away because 
Roselle was really ill. Besides, Perry 
knew that his wife would want to know 
everything that had happened, as soon 
as possible, and he wanted to share his 



impressions with her immediately, too. 

Mrs. Perry Como didn't attend her 
son's wedding because she was sick in 
bed. That was the simple, undramatic 
fact that the gossips had distorted and 
blown up into something suspicious. 
Even though she had been unable to be 
in South Bend in person, Roselle had 
sent the young couple her love and her 
blessings on their marriage. 

Perry's wife did more than this. She 
gave Melanie a beautiful string of pearls 
and a precious diamond ring, a family 
heirloom; precious because it cost a lot 
of money, more precious yet because of 
the sentimental value it possessed for 
Roselle and for Perry. Hardly the act 
of a woman who disapproves of her 
son's bride and is opposed to his mar- 
riage! 

It had bothered Roselle, a devout 
churchgoer, that Melanie was not a 
Catholic. But even that obstacle had 
been overcome when Melanie began 
taking instructions in Ronnie's religion 
so that she might share his faith. 

Both Roselle and Perry were against 
the marriage, at first, on the grounds 
that the young couple should wait a bit 
until Ronnie graduated and got started 
on his career. But this objection had 
faded quickly when they both saw how 
hopelessly in love Ronnie and Melanie 
were. Perry and Roselle had also mar- 
ried young, and the realization that 
their own marriage had been a most 
happy one helped them accept the fact 
that Melanie and Ronnie deserved the 
same right to happiness. 

Roselle stayed home, ill in bed — but 
her prayers and her love were with 
her son and his bride as they walked 
down the aisle of the little campus 
chapel. Furthermore, Perry did attend 
— and he's not the kind of man who 
takes part in anything of which he and 
his wife don't approve with all their 
hearts. 

The big house in Sands Point is quite 
empty now. Ronnie — whom Perry once 
labeled "the Italian Daniel Boone" be- 
cause he loves the outdoors so much — 
is married and, after he graduates from 
Notre Dame, will probably teach 
science somewhere. David is back at 
school in Connecticut. Terri, their 
daughter, is in high school down in 
Florida. 

Perry and Roselle love Terri and 
David, both adopted, as much as Ron- 
nie, their son by birth. "We've talked 
about adopting some more — I'd like 
to adopt about eight," Perry says. "But 
we don't like to be selfish about it. 
There are so many couples who haven't 
any children and are trying to adopt 
some. So I'm not saying we will and 
I'm not saying we won't." 

Then he adds with a big grin, his 
strong fingers running through his 
hair, "When the children are all 
grown up, I may marry Roselle again!" 



Hollywood's Biggest Tourist Attraction 






(Continued from page 33) 
Hollywood, Lawrence Welk and the 
world-famous ballroom have moved to 
the top of the list of tourist attractions 
in the film capital. 

Verification of that fact comes from 
Bob White, assistant executive secre- 
tary of the Hollywood Chamber of 
Commerce, who says, "We actually do 
not keep a list of what events attract 
the most people, but we do know that 
Welk has supplanted the Hollywood 
Bowl as the leading attraction. 

"We feel, of course, that Hollywood 
itself is the prime lure. That people like 
to walk the streets where the stars 
walk. But there is no denying that Welk 
is the greatest single attraction. It 
shows up in our mail. The largest single 
item of inquiry is about tickets for the 
Welk TV show. It makes up a dispro- 
portionate amount of our daily mail," 
he notes. 

The news comes as no surprise to the 
Palladium bookkeepers, who have been 
busy as the vaunted beavers keeping up 
with the tremendous turnouts for 
Welk's Friday and Saturday night 
dance parties. One of the largest dance 
halls in the nation, the Palladium was 
designed to hold 6,000 dancers comfort- 
ably. But, when Welk opened there, he 
drew more than 13,000 patrons for the 
two nights, with some 7,530 of them 
coming Saturday night. The next week- 
end drew 15,000. 

The figure easily broke the previous 
attendance record set by the legendary 
Tommy Dorsey and his band when the 
Palladium opened its doors to the public 
for the very first time in 1940. And, 
ever since the hectic reopening last 
July, the crowds have continued heavy, 
although diminishing somewhat as the 
tourist season ends. 

Barney McDevitt, a veteran Holly- 
wood publicist who has been with the 
Palladium since its beginning, finds the 
Welk phenomenon hard to believe. 
"This man's fan mail is fantastic! Do 
you know that, during the first ten 
weeks Welk was here, he drew more 
mail than all the other bands we had in 
here for twenty-one years — combined?" 

When McDevitt says "all the other 
bands we had in here," he means every 
major band in musical history, for they 
have all played the Palladium — Tommy 
Dorsey, Ray Anthony, Jimmy Dorsey, 
Harry James, Charlie Barnet, Guy 
Lombardo, Stan Kenton, Artie Shaw, 
Benny Goodman, Les Brown, Glenn 
Miller, Woody Herman, Perez Prado — 
all the big names. 

But Welk's mail in ten weeks was 
more than theirs combined in twenty- 
one years. 

"We get large parties of people, from 
all over the West, in here just to see 
and hear Lawrence," McDevitt points 



out. "We recently had several busloads 
from Reno, Nevada — five hundred miles 
away — come down on a Friday night 
because they knew that was the only 
way they could see him in person. And 
when the bubble machine is turned on 
at night, and those bubbles float up and 
over Sunset Boulevard, it often causes 
a major traffic tie-up. The cars with 
out-of-state licenses will back up for 
blocks, just watching the bubbles." 

The news is no surprise at all to Sam 
Lutz, Welk's canny manager. He's been 
in a position to observe the fantastic 
Welk appeal for a long time. "Do you 
know that we run as much as eight 
months behind on filling requests for 
tickets to his television broadcasts? 

"We constantly get letters from 
people who say they are planning their 
vacation around Lawrence and will 
come to Hollywood only if he will be 
in town and if they can get tickets to 
the show," Lutz continues. "We an- 
swer every letter and try to fulfill all 
the requests. Of course, when they want 
tickets for as far away as next summer 
— as some of the letters we got this 
week do — it's easy to oblige. 

"But we have a problem. The studio 
at ABC, from which the show is tele- 
cast, only seats 349 — and we could 
easily use 1,000 seats. Consequently, 
there's never an empty seat at a Welk 
show. Many shows, you know, over- 
print their tickets and give away maybe 
twice as many as the studio holds, 
figuring that way they'll get a full 
house. We wouldn't dare do that. We 
print tickets for exactly the number of 
seats. 

"And everybody always seems to 
show up. In fact, we do a dress rehears- 
al in the same studio, from 4 to 5 p.m. 
on Saturday, before a live audience. We 
don't have tickets for this, making it on 
a first-come, first-admitted basis. As 
early as noon, there are people lined 
up, waiting to get in. Network people 
tell me ours is the biggest request show 
in Hollywood. 

"And don't think these requests come 
only from tourists! Lawrence draws 
most of his fans to the dances from 
right here in Hollywood and surround- 
ing areas. Sophisticates have often 
looked down their noses and called the 
show 'corny,' claiming that Welk's 
main appeal is to farmers and back- 
woods and rural areas. I think they're 
beginning to change that erroneous 
opinion. 

"Lawrence is popular everywhere. 
His TV rating in urban Boston and 
Chicago is as high as it is on the smaller 
stations in the suburban areas. Look 
what he did at the Pennsylvania State 
Fair this fall. He broke a thirty-two- 
year record for attendance which had 
been held by Roy Rogers. He also broke 



all records during two days in Spring- 
field, Massachusetts. 

"No, Lawrence's appeal is not limited 
to just one class of people or one sec- 
tion of the country. Why, motel oper- 
ators here claim they get more inquiries 
about him than about anybody or any- 
thing else." 

The news of his success at the Palla- 
dium has been most gratifying to Welk 
himself. He had been reluctant to leave 
the Aragon Ballroom, the scene of his 
greatest fame. But the lure of a life- 
time contract, plus the great $400,000 
refurbishing of the Palladium, con- 
vinced him. "I guess we had to move," 
he says. "Santa Monica was harder for 
my fans to get to. Now we're closer to 
the freeways and I'm really happy 
we're in Hollywood. 

"It is most flattering to be called the 
number-one tourist attraction and even 
to be mentioned in the same breath 
with Disneyland. Since Disneyland is 
not in Hollywood and we are, it's a very 
pleasant feeling. Sometimes, though, 
when a guy gets thinking he's pretty 
good, someone comes along to show 
him he's not so much, after all. Like 
what happened to me the other night at 
the Palladium. 

"You know, as part of the show, I get 
out on the floor and dance with the 
ladies. I find that some of the men don't 
dance as much as they used to and the 
ladies miss it, so I started this tag danc- 
ing and it's worked out very happily. 
It seems to make the ladies happy when 
they can tag me and cut in and dance 
a few steps with me. 

"Well, this night I had a few tags, 
then all of a sudden I felt a heavy slap 
on my shoulder. I turned and saw a 
good-sized lady, heavy-set, who said 
to me, 'Mr. Welk, I drove three thou- 
sand miles to dance with you. I've never 
danced a step in my life before, but I 
want to dance with you.' 

Of course, I took her in my arms — 
but you can imagine that I had a little 
trouble getting into the beat, what with 
her size and the fact that she didn't 
know exactly what to do and all. Sud- 
denly, she stopped, looked me right in 
the eye and said, 'You know something, 
Mr. Welk? On TV, you look like a much 
better dancer.' And she walked off! 

"But, believe me, I'm so grateful she 
came." 

Les Kaufman, an associate of Welk, 
sums up the modesty of television's 
leading music-maker — now Hollywood's 
leading attention -getter. "We had just 
finished the last of the expensive re- 
modeling," he recalls, "and Lawrence 
came out to look at the marquee where 
his name was up in lights. He turned to T 
me and said — very quietly and almost jj 
in disbelief — 'Boy, it sure is a long way 

from our farmhouse in North Dakota.' " 

61 



(Continued from page 23) 
Then, almost stuttering, Elvis spoke his 
line. A minute later, he missed another 
cue entirely. Everyone on the set 
glanced at him uneasily. Elvis Presley 
always knew his lines — and, usually, 
everyone else's. They waited. Suddenly 
Elvis shook his head. With a kind of 
choked agony in his voice, he said, 
"Sorry, Mr. O'Connell— Anne— Mr. 
Douglas — fellas. I just don't feel up to it." 

"It's almost six o'clock, anyway," the 
director said quickly. "Let's call it a 
day." 

Without another word, Elvis turned 
and walked off the set. After a moment, 
Anne Helm followed him. She found 
him in his dressing room, staring into 
the mirror. In a corner, his cousin Gene 
and two old friends stood talking in 
whispers. At the sight of Anne, they 
exchanged a quick look, then filed 
silently out. 

Anne crossed the tiny room to Elvis. 
She put her hand on his shoulder. 
"Elvis," she said. "What is it? Tell me." 
He turned to face her. The look in his 
eyes made her blood freeze; under his 
makeup, his skin was white and sick. 

"Dee lost the baby," he said. 

That was all. 

To some people, it was not enough. 
"I always thought Elvis didn't like his 
stepmother, anyway," one skeptical 
observer said. "Of course, it's awful 
for someone to lose a baby, it's ter- 
ribly sad — but, the way Elvis reacted, 
you'd have thought it was his own kid, 
not one who would have been only a 
half-brother or sister. I don't see why 
it should be the end of the world for 
him." 

But others understood. They knew it 
was not the end of the world to Elvis. 
It was the end of a dream. 

They were the ones who had been 
there when the dream was born, only 
a short time before. 

The "Pioneer, Go Home" company 
was on location in Florida then. Elvis 
had come down by bus, pacing rest- 
lessly in the aisles through most of 
the trip. One of his friends, Lamar 
Fiske, had driven his station wagon 
down for him. Gene Smith drove down 
in one of Elvis's Cadillacs, towing be- 
hind him the singer's proudest new 
possession — a trailer bearing a twenty- 
one-foot Century Coronado cruiser. 
Reunited, the three friends had 
launched the boat almost immediately, 
had spent every spare minute aboard. 
Elvis had pondered long over a name 
for the boat. He knew that almost 
everyone expected him to do the obvi- 
ous — to name it "Gladys," after his late 
t mother. 

His extraordinary tact, what one 
friend called "a sort of delicacy of feel- 
ing," kept him from doing that — for 
62 



A Baby for Elvis 

fear of hurting his father's second wife. 
He had already gone out of his way, 
a dozen times, to explain to her that 
the often-repeated stories of his re- 
senting her were not true; he had tried, 
over and over, to let her know how 
pleased he was at the happiness she had 
brought his father, and how fond he 
was of her three sons by a previous 
marriage. He sent gifts to all of them 
frequently; he spoke to them often 
by phone; he invited them to join him 
on location. He would not risk hurting 
them even by paying tribute to the 
memory of his mother. 

"But what are you going to name the 
boat?" his friends asked. 

"I've been thinking about 'Ariadne,' " 
he said at last. "After my kid sister in 
'Pioneer.' I've always wanted a kid 
sister." 

The next day, Elvis had a phone call. 
His father, Dee and the three boys 
were driving down to visit him on 





FIGHT 



PALSY 

JOIN THE 

©CQMINUT6 
WO MARCH 



location. Elvis was pleased. But, fif- 
teen minutes after their arrival, his 
pleasure changed into what seemed to 
be a state of mild delirium. He had al- 
ways been generous with his time, as 
well as his money; now, suddenly, he 
could not do enough for his family, 
could not spend enough time with them 
to satisfy himself. 

He took them along wherever he 
went; he visited with them in every 
five-minute break from work; he drove 
them to a nearby town, Ocala, to show 
them the place where he had first gone 
over big with an audience; he ate with 
them every evening. Often, he took 
them out on the boat, handing his step- 
mother on and off with infinite care. 
When finally they left, just in time to 
drive the three young boys back to 
school in Tennessee, he seemed sud- 
denly lost, restless. 

His friends decided to distract him. 
"Elvis, how about getting that name 
painted on the boat? You've got to de- 
cide how big you want it, what color — " 

"Name?" Elvis said blankly. "What 
name?" 

"Why, Ariadne. You were going to 
name the boat Ariadne, remember?" 

"That's all off," Elvis said. "We gotta 
wait." 

"Wait for what?" 

His face lit up. He took a deep 



breath. Then, joyously: "Wait till the 
baby is born, of course! We'll name 
the boat after the baby!" 

The company packed up and went 
back to Hollywood. From there, the 
news spread. Elvis's stepmother was 
pregnant. The baby was due in spring. 
Reporters descended on Graceland, 
Elvis's Tennessee estate, where Vernon 
Presley and Dee were staying. To their 
surprise, the news was at first denied. 

"Where'd you hear that?" Vernon 
wanted to know. 

"From Elvis." 

Vernon left the room. A few min- 
utes later, he was back. Laughing, he 
admitted the story was true. "We hadn't 
planned to tell so soon, but as long 
as it's out, anyway — " He laughed 
again. "Elvis just told me on the phone 
he didn't know it was a secret." It was 
unnecessary for him to add that Elvis 
obviously could no more have kept the 
good news "a secret" than he could 
have stopped breathing. 

The return to Hollywood had not 
taken the edge off Elvis's excitement. 
Now he phoned Graceland every eve- 
ning to ask for news — an old tradition 
he had discontinued after his own 
mother's death. Vernon and Dee had 
arranged to move into a home of their 
own in Memphis; he begged them to 
stay on at Graceland instead. 

When he heard that Dee, only two 
months' pregnant, was beginning to try 
on maternity clothes, he was delighted. 
When complications arose briefly, he 
insisted that she check into Methodist 
Hospital for a couple of days. Usually 
reticent about his private emotions, he 
confessed to friends that he secretly 
hoped the baby would be a girl. Girl 
or boy, it was obvious that the unborn 
child suddenly meant more to Elvis 
than anything else in his life. 

Even then, there were those who 
were puzzled, who wondered why. And 
others who knew Elvis and his story 
well enough to understand. 

They knew that he had been born 
one of twins; his brother, Aaron, had 
died shortly after birth, and Elvis, the 
remaining twin, was given the dead 
child's name for a middle name. There 
were no more babies for the Presleys, 
after that. It seemed to some of the 
people who knew Elvis best that he 
had always felt a vague, unmerited 
sense of guilt for having lived when 
his brother died; certainly, he spent 
much of his life trying to make up to 
his parents for being their only child. 

Perhaps because of that hidden guilt, 
he himself needed love more than most. 
From his parents, he received it gen- 
erously, but the love of the rest of the 
world was harder to achieve. His class- 
mates and teachers remember him as a 
shy boy who looked different from the 



other children, who had few clothes, 
little spending money, less free time. 
He soon learned that the one way in 
which he could be sure of winning 
approval was by singing. 

Accordingly, he sang at school 
dances, at parties, at church socials, 
and basked in the warm applause. For 
a while, it was enough. Through his 
singing, he made friends, became rea- 
sonably popular. But this sort of ac- 
ceptance always carries with it a germ 
of doubt. Is there a performer alive 
who has not asked himself: Am 1 loved 
for myself — or for my talent? If I lost 
the talent tonight, would I have a friend 
tomorrow? 

For Elvis then — and later, as his 
fame grew — there was no easy answer. 

Once or twice, he found people who 
cared for him only for himself. His 
first tour manager, disc-jockey Bob 
Neal, was one. The Neals had five sons 
and treated Elvis as a sixth — for a 
while, he made them the center of his 
life, reveling in the warmth of the 
large family. But he was not really 
their son, and when the time came for 
Bob to choose between accompanying 
Elvis and going home to his own five 
boys, he had, of course, to choose the 
latter course. With all his heart Elvis 
understood and sympathized, but still 
— he was alone again. 

He found another such friend in a 
cousin, Caroll Smith. But while Elvis 
was working on "Wild in the Country," 
Caroll died. 

He had his parents, of course, but 
parents, however loving, cannot fill a 
young man's life entirely. And after 
the death of his mother, after his 
father's remarriage, the void was even 
greater. 

1 he obvious solution was for Elvis to 
fall in love, to marry. Several times, 
he thought he had found the right girl. 
Each time, he was bitterly disappointed. 
He finally confessed that, more often 
than not, he was being used by the 
girls he dated — that they were eager to 
share every moment of their dates 
with him with reporters in return for 
prestige, publicity, the thrill of seeing 
their names in the paper. In near- 
despair, Elvis tried to fill his life with 
substitute loves. 

For a while, he developed what was 
almost an obsession about cars. He 
bought them — yellow Cadillacs, pink 
Cadillacs, station wagons, Rolls-Royces. 
He washed them himself, tinkered 
with them constantly, improved them 
in ingenious ways. Whenever he could, 
he parked them conspicuously on the 
street instead of in garages. He was not 
showing off. It was simply that a car 
was reliable; it could not betray him. 
It knew nothing of his name or fame, 
but it responded vitally to care and ex- 
pert handling. He needed that response. 

But, of course, it was not enough. 



He began to collect a retinue of 
friends who could be with him con- 
stantly, safeguards against loneliness. 
Actors down on their luck, relatives, 
old acquaintances went on the Presley 
payroll, traveled with him, lived with 
him. He was open-handed and gener- 
ous with them all. Clothes, spending 
money, the use of his possessions — all 
these were theirs for the asking. Some, 
like Nick Adams, credit him with sav- 
ing their professional lives. Others are 
with him still; some will always be. 
But, though these friends have proved 
themselves loving and loyal, it would 
be a self-assured man indeed who 
could keep from wondering sometimes: 
Did I buy their love? 

And then, in Europe, during his 
Army duty, Elvis became friendly with 
a sergeant and his wife. He became a 
visitor in their home. And he made the 
acquaintance of their baby son. Almost 
immediately, the child opened his heart 
to Elvis. Elvis's arrival was greeted 
with whoops of joy; his departure was 
a signal for tears. The little boy ac- 
cepted Elvis's tenderness and returned 
it with interest; he delighted in Elvis's 
ability to make up games, to sing nurs- 
ery songs, to tell stories. 

The press made much of the fact 
that Private Elvis Presley often baby- 
sat for the sergeant and his wife. They 
thought it a kind of joke. But, to Elvis, 
it was no joke at all. This baby knew 
nothing about his money or fame. He 
simply loved the nice soldier who came 
and played with him while Daddy and 
Mommy went out. It was no joke at all 
to say that, in the innocence and love 
of a little child, Elvis found much of 
what he was looking for. 

He might have found it again in the 
three stepbrothers Dee brought him 
when she married his father. From the 
beginning, Elvis was fond of them and 
they of him. Visitors to Graceland 
often found him playing football with 
them on the wide, grassy lawns, and 
the boys' rooms were crowded with the 
toys Elvis sent them from his tours. 
But — at five, seven and eight — the little 
boys were old enough to know who 
their stepbrother was, to have heard 
his records, seen his pictures, to stand 
a little in awe of his fame. His rela- 
tionship with them was, of necessity, 
tinged by his career. 

So, when Vernon and Dee told Elvis 
in Florida that they were expecting 
a child, a new and shining dream was 
born. A new life was coming into the 
world. Long, long before the child 
could know anything else about Elvis, 
it would have come to love him as big 
brother, friend and playmate — to love 
him for himself. And, this time, the 
baby would be his own flesh and blood. 
Not a stranger's child from whom time 
and distance might part him — not a 
member of someone else's family — but 




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63 



MAKE-UP ON THE 
GOLD STANDARD 




64 



Robbin Bain, NBC-TV's charming "Today Girl," loves the look 

of gold make-up for gala evenings and holiday dances. 



by BARBARA MARCO 

■ The Golden Look is definitely in for holiday evenings, and all that 
glitters is very likely to be the real thing! Liquid gold for lips and fingertips, 
gold lamee foundation and powder to highlight the complexion, molten gold 
to gild the eyes and hair ... all of these 24-carat cosmetics are making big 
news in evening beauty this year! . . . How can you be a Golden Girl? 
We asked Robbin Bain — a model, actress and former "Miss Rheingold" who 
realizes the importance of make-up in dramatizing natural good looks. "I'm 
all for the Golden Look for evening," Robbin stated when we interviewed 
her in her Manhattan apartment. Robbin was wearing one of her favorite 
at-home outfits — toreador pants and a top in (you guessed it) gold brocade! 
"To begin, I 'cool' the color of my complexion with pale blue foundation," she 
explained. "Then I highlight and accentuate the natural planes of my face 
with sheer golden powder." As we talked, Robbin revealed more make-up 
tricks: "Mix gold with green eyeshadow for emerald sparkle; gold with 
lavender for amethyst eyes," she said. "What about nails?" we asked. "I start 
with a coat of gold nail enamel under my regular polish for extra depth and 
shimmer," said Robbin. . . . Besides Robbin's favorites, here are a few 
more ways to glitter this holiday season: Try gold foundation under flesh-toned 
powder for a subtle, luminous complexion. Dust flecks of gold over the face 
or nails for glitter plus! Deep, dark, mysterious eyes shine out like precious 
jewels from a setting of liquid gold eyeliner. Already darkened eyelashes 
can be gold-tipped; eyelids, shadowed by a mocha-cream eyeshadow that's 
sprinkled with ground gold. Streak an evening hair-do with fluid gold. Gild 
already polished fingernails with gold nail enamel or paint it on straight 
from the bottle for pure dazzle! Gold lipstick is a perfect frosting for 
brilliant color on the lips; when used under color, it flickers with a subtle 
yet constant glimmer. Yes — it's a smart gal who stays on the "gold standard." 

TV Radio Mirror says: Although this Midas-touched make-up can't be put 
in the Beauty Budget category, an investment in a little pure gold pays big 
beauty dividends when that Big Evening rolls around! 



his own half-brother or sister, on whom 
he could lavish all his pent-up affec- 
tion without fear. 

Perhaps you might say that the 
dream was not really born in Florida, 
after all. You might say it was born 
years before, in Tennessee, when a 
thin, shabby, tow-headed child tried 
to scrape up courage to make friends 
with the children in the school yard 
at recess. You might say it was born 
when Elvis Presley first looked down 
at a thousand ecstatic, adoring fans — 
and wondered what they would think 
of him, if he had never sung a note. 
You might say it was born in dis- 
appointment, every time he was hurt 
by a publicity-conscious starlet. And 
in hope, in a sergeant's tiny living room. 
Born over and over again, throughout 
Elvis Presley's life. 

You might say that was why it died 
so hard. 

Anne Helm, who stayed with Elvis for 
much of the day when he learned 
that the baby had been lost, told 
friends later that she had never seen 
anyone so badly in need of tears. "Every 
time I looked at his eyes, I wished he 
could cry," she said. "It might have 
done something to ease the hurt." 

But another friend, one who has 
known Elvis for many years, saw it 
differently. "It's a tragedy for all the 
Presleys, of course," he said. "And yet, 
in a sense, it may be better for Elvis 
this way. You see, he's been a sub- 
stitute father so often already. To his 
friends — he gives them things the way 
a father provides for his children. To 
those cars of his — he nurses them the 
way a mother takes care of a baby. To 
that kid he was so nuts about in Ger- 
many. Even to his own folks, in a way 
— providing for them, giving them a 
home, looking after them as if he were 
the parent himself. 

"If Dee had had the baby, it would 
have happened all over again, only 
more so. The truth is, there's no need 
for Elvis to sub for someone else. He 
should have a family and kids of his 
own to love and fuss over and do for. I 
know he's been hurt by a lot of girls, 
but that doesn't mean there isn't one, 
somewhere, who'll really love him, if 
she gets the chance. That's what Elvis 
should be looking for now, even if it 
means his risking being hurt again. 

"A wife and a family of his own — 
people who really belong to him — that's 
what he needs, what he really wants. I 
only hope this tragedy will bring that 
home to him." 

Wise men say that happiness is often 
born in sorrow; that, out of disappoint- 
ment, new hope can arise. It is pos- 
sible that, for Elvis Presley, the end 
of his most cherished dream can mean 
the beginning of something more than 
a dream. Something like a new life — 
of his own. 



"Why I Married an Older Woman" 



(Continued from page 29) 
answer any of my calls for three days. 
Then we both knew we had to see each 
other again, and we did." 

Mike's parents refused to meet 
Dodie. His mother — glad that he had 
never been serious about any particu- 
lar younger girl, because she wished 
him to concentrate on his studies — 
ordered him to stay away from the trap 
she fancied Dodie had set for him. He 
couldn't be swayed, even by her tears. 
In his heart, Mike knew he was right. 
He'd never been attracted to anybody 
older before; he had no "mother com- 
plex." What his family never suspected 
was that Dodie simply treated him like 
the man he subconsciously yearned 
to be. 

From the start, Dodie reacted as if 
Mike were obviously man enough to 
lick every obstacle somehow. "At first," 
she recalls, "I wanted to see him again 
because he was so much fun. He made 
me feel gay once more. Then I realized 
that, while I dreaded facing difficult 
decisions, Mike wouldn't run away 
from anything important. He wanted to 
understand and make the best move. 
Whenever we were together, he 
showed me how to be braver. I trusted 
the wisdom and strength I saw in him. 
I've always had complete confidence in 
him." 

Dodie has no reservations about 
Mike, and Mike has never had any 
doubts about the wisdom of their mar- 
riage, either then or now. "We didn't 
have to put on any disguise with each 
other," he says. "I literally had no 
money to take her out, and she didn't 
mind. I liked her and Mark so much, it 
was marvelous to join them sometime 
evei - y day." 

Dodie is pretty and graceful. And, 
behind her quick friendliness there is a 
lasting loyalty, an intelligence and a 
zest for living fully which is irresistible 
to anyone as virile as Mike. A widow 
since she was eighteen — a month be- 
fore Mark's birth — she was touched by 
Mike's tenderness to her and his fond- 
ness for her son. "Mike never ignored 
him, showed me what a great father he 
could be." 

But she was deluged with warnings, 
too. She had never dated a younger 
man and, as a legal secretary in Bev- 
erly Hills, she was courted by men who 
were well established. Her friends 
unanimously assured her that she was 
balmy to care for a broke, bewildered 
would-be actor who appeared to be no 
more than seventeen! 

Mike had had one TV lead. But that 
show wasn't seen until many months 
later and, even then, critical praise did 
nothing for him. He took a part-time 
job that allowed him to be available in 
case he received any studio calls. All he 
got was the awareness that he was ex- 



periencing and responding to the mira- 
cle of love. 

For three months, they tested their 
feelings. Then they walked hand in 
hand, with Mark at their side, into the 
life they longed for, instead of letting 
onlookers rob them of it. 

Mike and Dodie had one severe jolt 
after another, the first year they were 
husband and wife. She became puz- 
zlingly sick and had to give up her job. 
Embarrassingly late with their rent, 
the three of them moved into a single 
attic room her grandmother arranged 
for. Dodie had to remain in bed three 
months, but she rose determinedly to 
cook on a couple of hot plates they 
plugged into a socket in place of a 
stove. They went without food when 
there was merely enough for Mark and 
their cats. They walloped disaster when 
Dodie had to have an emergency 
operation. 

Mike weighed forty pounds less than 
he does today, all that time he was des- 
perately seeking another chance at 
acting. He supported his little family 
by door-to-door selling, because they 
wouldn't seek charity or settle for de- 
feat. By holding on together till the tide 
finally turned, they proved their love 
could withstand such severe tests. 
After that was undeniable, his folks ac- 
cepted his choice. 

"Certainly, Mike can be unpredicta- 
ble in surface things," Dodie smiles. "I 
wouldn't have been drawn to him if he 
were inevitably the same, deep in a rut. 
I'm glad he thinks life ought to be ex- 
citing and grateful he can make it so." 

Xhe manliness Dodie has always seen 
in Mike is what inspires him most. It's 
the reason he is realistically making his 
dreams come true today. Dodie herself 
has never evaded responsibilities, so 
depending on Mike has been her sin- 
cerest compliment to his abilities. But 
she was resolutely on her own until 
she recognized his all-around strength. 

"I never wanted a husband who was 
weak," says Dodie. "So I waited. Mike 
never had to be babied. He never sulks 
or has silly tantrums. But he has a 
temper. He's very emotional, and so am 
I. We want to express our feelings, so 
we do. I could never pretend enough to 
become an actress, and Mike beams 
when that occurs to him. I want him to 
count on the sincerity we share. He 
turns off his acting, the moment the 
camera stops. But — if either of us is 
disturbed by anything — we say so, and 
hope the other is present to listen sym- 
pathetically and help with a quick 
solution." 

"We don't permit superficial things to 
distract us from talking everything 
out," Mike says. "This is a basic part of 
marriage to us. Our hopes, our disap- 
pointments, the funny things that have 



happened — we want to discuss every- 
thing, and we do. We're not afraid to 
say we've been mistaken — or that the 
other has been, either — because it 
doesn't make sense to us to lie. Dodie 
has let me be totally truthful!" She has 
also let him love wholly. "This is why 
our love will last," he points out. 

Promptly upon their marriage, Mike 
followed his instinct and became a de- 
voted father to Mark, who idolizes him. 
Adopting Mark was not enough. Like 
Dodie, Mike couldn't be content lavish- 
ing all his attention on an only child. 
Two years ago this February, they 
found a second son. Josh was a few 
days old when he joined them, and his 
crib was beside their bed until it was 
time for him to be moved into the ad- 
joining room. 

By the time Josh was a year-and-a- 
half old, he was merrily dipping his 
toes in the swimming pool in their gar- 
den and begging to swim. Lately, Mike 
has broken all Hollywood precedent by 
blithely taking Josh to the studio on a 
number of working days. His toddling 
son is quiet as a mouse when the cam- 
era turns, eats beside his father in a 
high chair in the Paramount cafe, and 
shrieks with joy when Mike manages to 
dash into doorways, playing hide-and- 
seek, as they trot to and from the Lan- 
don dressing-room. 

"I don't know how long this will 
last," Dodie declares. "Mike and I al- 
ways said a child of ours would never 
get near a studio. But Mike says he 
misses Josh, and he's the boss." 

Last February, they found another 
infant boy they wanted, so Jason joined 
the happy group. His personality, they 
notice, is also unique. They respect the 
individual differences in each child. 

"This February, we expect to adopt 
a baby girl," Mike reveals. "Three sons 
definitely should have that balance." 
Because he likes and understands ba- 
bies and children of all ages, Mike is 
thoroughly at ease around them. He 
can't conceive of living without a warm 
family whirl, so Dodie's quiet skill at 
running a home superbly is one of her 
major charms to him. 

"She never nags me to help. Like all 
fellows, I put things off when I see 
what I could do at home. Dodie knows 
it took me four months to remodel the 
den. That is, to get to it! To lay the 
linoleum, I had to rent a heavy roller. I 
left it outside for three weeks before 
taking it back a whole five blocks. And 
she didn't think I was horrible. She 
thought I was a husband!" 

His hours at work are long. But, ever 

since they bought their Spanish-type 

house a year-and-a-half ago, he has 

been redoing its twenty rooms grad- T 

ually. Painting and carpentering have v 

become second nature to him. Dodie 

has done the detailed painting and put 

65 



down mosaic. She's made the drapes on 
her sewing machine. "I like to sew. 
We're busy with our hands. Now 
Mike's experimenting with the fun of 
being a sculptor in his spare time." 

They budget wisely, shop for bar- 
gains so they can save as much as pos- 
sible for a solid future. They aren't 
tempted to keep up with the Hollywood 
Joneses, but always have the welcome 
mat at their door for their friends and 
a hospitality feast for everyone who 
enters. They play bridge and pinochle 
spiritedly, read worthwhile magazines 
and books, and make a great occasion 
out of every birthday and anniversary. 

"I like the way Dodie runs about the 
house in capris and a sweater and 



barefooted!" Mike exclaims, as Dodie 
scoots out to start dinner. "He picks out 
nearly everything I wear," she notes, 
overhearing that remark. "Luckily, he 
has the best taste. He can combine col- 
ors for me much better than I can my- 
self. I think I'm awfully lucky to have 
a husband who is so interested." 

Mike says, "I stop in at several shops, 
when I'm through early at the studio, 
and look at what they have in size- 
eight. No, I'm never embarrassed! Why 
should a man be? I get a kick out of 
astonishing her with something new, 
and I think she's terrific for dressing to 
please me, not other women. But she 
doesn't shop for my clothes," he con- 
cludes. "I think a husband ought to be 



bright enough to take care of himself 
when it comes to what he wears!" 

Mike hasn't built a wall around his 
heart. He licked loneliness by not re- 
jecting his opportunity for happiness 
when he saw it. He fought for it, and 
cherishes the love of the one woman he 
is sure he wants as his wife for the rest 
of their lives. 

They are planning another wedding 
anniversary party for March. "Last 
year, I strung colored lights all around 
the playroom downstairs and it over- 
loaded the circuits," Mike confesses. 
"Dodie kept hurrying to put in an- 
other new fuse." This year, if they do 
any rewiring for their fifth anniver- 
sary, they'll remember to do it warily! 



(Continued from page 9) 
the high gray wall of the orphanage 
and the harsh treatment given all new- 
comers by both attendants and the 
other restless, displaced orphans. "My 
mother got sick," Milt explains. "With 
two brothers and sisters, besides my- 
self, we had to split up." 

He was young and, with the resiliency 
of youth, he bounced back. Now it 
seems like a distant memory — the daily 
fist fights, the meager food, the in- 
difference, the battle for survival. Says 
Milt, "I came from Brownsville, in 
Brooklyn — that's the tough section 
which spawned Murder, Inc., the pay- 
for-death syndicate. I was lucky, 
though, because someone shoved a 
French horn in my hand instead of a 
gun." 

Now in his early thirties, Milt con- 
fesses he was "scared" of the daily 
fights, and the killings going on about 
him. He was surly, tough. But, inside, 
he knew there must be a better world 
than the jungle about him. While at- 
tending Tilden High School in Brook- 
lyn, he got his first look at the brighter 
side of life. "Mr. Shellens, of Tilden 
High, encouraged me to try music. It 
was my first bout with culture. 

"Later on, when I transferred to 
Abraham Lincoln High, also in Brook- 
lyn, Mr. Jacques Wolf, the head of the 
music department there, let me take 
a French horn home for the whole 
summer, to practice. Since I was too 
poor to buy one, the help he gave me 
was invaluable." Graduating from Lin- 
coln, Milt enrolled at the Juilliard 
School of Music. He was a scholarship 
student, and he studied hard. 

He left Juilliard in 1941, when he was 
called into a special section of the Air 
Corps. He became a photo interpreter 
for the Air Corps, and stuck with iden- 
T tifying planes, etc., until the end of 
v the war. "Then, I got into the mad 
post-war scramble for orchestral jobs. 

"Everybody seemed to be able to 
66 



A Flair for Laughter 

play an instrument," he recalls. But 
Milt must have played his better than 
most, for he was soon signed to tour 
with "The Chocolate Soldier," under 
Oscar Strauss' baton. He also played 
for the Ballet Theater Symphony and 
the Columbus Symphony — all first- 
rate jobs, coveted by many a more ex- 
perienced musician. Coming back to 
New York, he performed in the "pit 
bands" at such Broadway shows as 
"Lend an Ear" and "Where's Charley?" 

The latter show starred that incom- 
parable stylist, Ray Bolger. "Watching 
him," says Milt. "I got my first inkling 
that maybe I'd like to try comedy. It 
was more subconscious with me. Still, 
after that, I began to go around to 
watch the different television shows 
which had comedians on — like Sid 
Caesar's show, a show which was later 
to play a big part in my life." 

The fever of people laughing at 
funny bits of comedy got into Milt's 
blood. He had to make a choice: Either 
continue with the French horn and 
make a comfortable living ... or try 
comedy, with no certainty of any future 
at all. "I chose comedy. And, the next 
day, I sold my French horn so I 
wouldn't be tempted to fall back on 
getting a music job." 

But, though Milt was ready to tackle 
the world of comedy, comedy was not 
ready for him — in the professional 
sense, at least. "So, I became a wrapper 
in the garment center for the next 
year." Times were tough, for Milt, in 
1953 and the beginning of '54. 

"I decided to join the army of ex- 
tras who haunt television casting direc- 
tors. I had to learn from somewhere, 
and where else," asks Milt, "could an 
unknown start, and learn his craft?" 
The Jackie Gleason Show and The Big 
Story found Milt in their background 
scenes, but observing Gleason was 
worth more to Milt than any amount of 
money they paid him. He watched the 
little touches that make a great come- 



dian, and soon he decided to try a sin- 
gle act for himself. "Since I had no 
money to hire a writer, I wrote the act 
myself. I still write my own stuff." 

Milt found himself booked into The 
Purple Onion in San Francisco, a 
spawning-ground for young comics. He 
stayed there for three months, in 1954. 
In the beginning of 1955, he got a one- 
month booking at "the hungry i," 
where Mort Sahl had been given his 
first big chance. Modest Milt says 
only: "The boss was extremely kind to 
me. He let me stay a month, although I 
wasn't setting any records there. I 
think he held me over because I once 
tasted the lobster bisque he made, and 
said it was delicious." 

Coming back to New York, Milt 
made the endless and dreary rounds of 
the casting offices again, though not as 
an "extra," this time. Then Carol Evans, 
secretary on The Sid Caesar Show, met 
him and introduced him to Carl Reiner 
— who, in turn, introduced him to Sid 
himself. "Sid took one look at me," 
Milt recalls, "talked to me for a few 
minutes, and hired me — more out of 
intuition than anything else, since he 
had never seen me work." 

Milt became an all-around handy 
man for the show, sometimes standing 
in for Sid, other times writing in a 
funny piece of business for the show or 
setting up sketches. He stayed with Sid 
for three happy years, until 1958. Dur- 
ing this time, he also doubled on Pan- 
tomime Quiz, as well as Steve Allen's 
Tonight show. And it . was Steve who 
gave Milt his first television opportu- 
nity to do a "single." 

Feeling his way, Milt invaded the 
night-club field. Before he knew it, he 
was headlining at the Village Van- 
guard, the Bon Soir, the Blue Angel — 
three of New York's top spots for 
comedians. "Everything went well for 
me. The next thing I knew, I was in 
Hollywood playing The Cloisters. That, 
too, worked out nice for me, especially 



^ 



when one of my favorites, Groucho 
Marx, came backstage and told me he 
thought I was great!" 

The money was getting a little better, 
too. Milt could forget the harsh days of 
his youth. And, one night, while play- 
ing a return engagement at the Blue 
Angel, he saw a guest laughing hard at 
some of his lines, and asked him to 
come up on stage and tell a joke him- 
self. "He did, and he got a good laugh. 
His name was Nixon. Vice-President 
Richard Nixon." 

Soon Milt was booked for a guest 
shot on The Perry Como Show by 
someone who thought he might get a 
few laughs. For the first time in his 
career, Milt worked in a sketch with 



such company as Como and Bob Hope, 
and his appearance as the French-horn 
player from Mitchell Ayres' band 
brought loud guffaws. Perry asked him 
back for the following week. "He's just 
like you always read about — a nice guy, 
a real pro, and a guy it's a pleasure 
to be around. You might say, when 
you go to work for him, it's like going 
to visit your friends." 

As critic John Crosby said, after 
viewing Milt: "Milton Kamen's comedy 
ranged from the magnificent to less 
than that." And Milt smiled. He re- 
members when "less than magnificent" 
was the high gray wall he was once 
forced to call "home" — before he de- 
veloped his great flair for laughter. 



Why They Had to Split! 



(Continued from page 21) 
Marilyn Monroe romance, which also 
ended in divorce. Opposites may at- 
tract, but they also tend to drift apart. 

Joe Ferrer, often called "the reign- 
ing genius of the American theater," is 
a man of wealthy and cultured back- 
ground with an unquenchable interest 
in all things intellectual. Rbsie is strict- 
ly show biz, and the inspired chanting 
of this enchanting doll has aroused the 
wildest enthusiasm from fans and 
critics alike. She has had a hit career 
in the movies, night clubs and on rec- 
ords. It was a common interest in jazz 
which attracted each to the other when 
they first met at a party. At the time, 
Joe was divorced from actress Uta 
Hagen and separated from his second 
wife, Phyllis Hill, also a Broadway ac- 
tress. For Rosie, it was the first com- 
pelling love of her life. They began to 
date quietly. 

It's a touch of irony that their mar- 
riage began and ended in Dallas, Texas. 
This is pure coincidence. Joe was star- 
ring in "Kiss Me Kate" for Margo 
Jones's theater and Rosie flew down to 
see him. He proposed they be married 
immediately, and she accepted. It was 
as simple as that. On the morning of 
July 13, 1953, accompanied by their 
good friends, Mr. and Mrs. Kurt Frings, 
and Rosie's manager, Joe Shribman, 
they drove to Durant, Oklahoma — 
where there was no pre-marriage wait- 
ing time — and were married. They had 
no honeymoon, because Rosie had to be 
in Hollywood the next day, while Joe 
had to get back to Dallas. 

Their marriage, unfortunately, had to 
follow the pattern of their honeymoon. 
Interludes of happiness together, be- 
tween absences caused by their sepa- 
rate careers. When Joe went to Europe 
for several films, a few years after their 
marriage, Rosemary went along, taking 
Miguel, their eldest child, but leaving 
the baby, Maria, with her mother and 
younger sister. Although she knew little 



Maria was getting the best of care, "the 
trip was spoiled for me and, then and 
there, I decided that I would not sepa- 
rate the family again," Rosemary re- 
calls. 

This was a good intention which 
somehow eluded her control. Joe is a 
serious actor whose love of the legiti- 
mate theater lured him time and again 
back to Broadway. Rosie's major in- 
terests — including her daily CBS Radio 
show with Bing Crosby — were on the 
West Coast. Nevertheless, she rented 
an apartment in New York and com- 
muted as often as possible, in order to 
be at his side. While on the East Coast, 
she did her best to keep up with Joe's 
intense concern with art, books, music 
and the theater. But her heart remained 
in the rambling Spanish-type house in 
Beverly Hills which the Ferrer family 
called home. 

Occasionally, it was the other way 
around. When Rosie was singing at a 
hotel in Las Vegas, Joe would come to 
her dressing room after each show to 
take her home. She was expecting her 
third child, at the time, and sack dresses 
were in fashion. A writer who came 
backstage to say hello told her that the 
buzz which greeted her entrance was 
the women in the place asking each 
other, "Is she ... or is it the dress?" 
Rosie laughed and launched into an 
animated conversation about some of 
the songs she had scored with, "Come- 
On-a-My House" and others. 

When Joe came into the room, sud- 
denly the chatter turned esoteric. A 
long, rather academic discussion de- 
veloped about "poetry in the theater," 
to which Rosemary listened as she got 
ready to leave. The visitor was startled 
when Rosie suddenly tossed aside her 
powder puff and said, in an abrupt but 
strangely wistful tone, "Don't you think 
we ought to be getting along to the 
children?" It was quite apparent — and 
probably only natural — that her mind 
was more on personal concerns than on 



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67 



the survival of poetic plays such as 
Ferrer's great hits, "Cyrano de Ber- 
gerac" and "Richard III." . . . 

Joe was busy directing "State Fair" 
in Dallas, when Rosemary flew there to 
have it out. Joe refused to take her 
seriously. He felt her emotional upset 
was due to the loss of their expected 
sixth baby. "Why don't you leave the 
children behind and go on location with 
me?" he had suggested. 

Into Rosie's mind came the picture 
of her beloved five: Miguel, 6; Maria, 
5; Gabrielle, 4; Monsita, 3; Rafael, not 
yet two. "I can't do that," she told him. 
"Our views differ on what makes for a 
good marriage and it is affecting our 
children. You leave me no choice. I'm 
suing for a divorce." 

Another statement she gave at that 
time, about Joe, was illuminating. "He 
is a charming and intellectual man," she 
said, "but his interests revolve around 
himself. I can't seem to fit in, the way 
a wife should. It's come to the point 
where I can't take any more of it. This 
is final." 



Time had worked its alteration. Some 
years before, she had answered a query 
on her husband's interests by saying 
with obvious pride: "It's amazing, 
really. He acts, writes, directs, pro- 
duces; he plays sensational tennis; he 
cooks like a chef; he fishes like Izaak 
Walton and he's also managing a boxer. 
And, best of all, he is interested in get- 
ting me interested in all these things. 
I'm learning something new every day 
and I love it." 

What lies ahead for the Ferrers? A 
lingering hope exists that they may, for 
the sake of their five youngsters, come 
to some common ground and reconcile. 
At the time of the divorce announce- 
ment, Joe instructed the operator at the 
Dallas hotel where he was staying to 
accept no calls for him. He would make 
no comment to reporters. Friends said 
he was waiting to see if Rosie would 
change her mind. She did not. 

In her suit, filed in the Santa Monica 
court, she is asking for $8,000 a month 
alimony and custody of the children. At 



first, she had planned on asking only for 
support of the children — but, on second 
thought, she realized that this was not 
practical. 

It is well known that Joe comes from 
one of Puerto Rico's wealthiest families 
and has over two millions in personal 
assets. While he was always generous 
to Rosie and the family, he rarely dis- 
cussed business affairs with her. This 
appears to have also been a bone of 
contention. Joe is of the Latin school 
that feels the man's place as head of 
the family would be impugned if he 
went into details about money matters 
with the woman of the house. 

"The future looks bleak for five little 
Ferrers," said one friend, "but every- 
one's still keeping a lamp of hope 
lighted. Maybe if Rosie's health gets 
back to normal — and Joe gets tired of 
racing around after this enthusiasm and 
that — and if both these things happen 
at the same time . . . well, maybe." 

But, much as Rosie and Joe are liked 
in the film colony, nobody's laying odds 
on their future together. 



It Takes a Fool to Be a Lady Comic 



(Continued from page 31) 
faces, as in the pictures up front — an 
extremely nice-looking one. She might 
rebel at being called "beautiful," but 
she's darn close to it. "Some of my 
friends keep asking me why I make my- 
self look so awful on television," she 
admits. "Let's face it. I have the most 
fun when I'm playing a slob." And who 
ever saw a beautiful slob?" 

This brought up the subject of why 
there are so few comediennes, as com- 
pared to the large number of comedi- 
ans. Is it because the public will not 
accept laughter from a woman? 

"Not at all," says Carol, who has won 
numerous awards as television's lead- 
ing female laugh-getter. "The big rea- 
son there are so few of us is that too 
many women are afraid to let them- 
selves go. They're too inhibited. They 
don't want to appear unattractive. To 
be a comedienne, you must be a little 
boisterous and a bit of a kook. 

"This doesn't appeal to most women. 
They don't want the public to see them 
with their lipstick smeared or their hair 
messed up. They consider this unfemi- 
nine. To me, this is a fallacy. The late 
Kay Kendall, a superb clown, was one 
of the most feminine women I've ever 
seen. And Lucille Ball is another ex- 
ample. She can cross her eyes, fall in 
the mud, and still come up smelling 
like a rose. 

"I love doing the type of comedy I 

perform on The Garry Moore Show. 

T Perhaps, to some, it's not feminine. But 

v when I hear those laughs . . . well, 

that's all that counts to me. Someday I 

would like to do more straight acting in 
68 



comedy roles, something like Shirley 
MacLaine and Judy Holliday. But I 
have no desire to play tragedy. There's 
already too much tragedy in the world. 
I'm much happier making people laugh. 
Not only does it make me feel good, it 
also makes the audience feel good. This 
may sound kooky, but I consider my- 
self very fortunate to be able to spread 
a little laughter around. In fact, you 
could say that I'm the luckiest person 
in the world." 

Although she was born in San An- 
tonio, Texas, Carol moved to Los An- 
geles when she was eight and regards 
the West Coast city as her hometown. 
After graduation from Hollywood 
High, she entered U.C.L.A. with every 
intention of majoring in journalism. 
However, she soon switched to the uni- 
versity's theater arts department to 
take playwriting courses, and even- 
tually wound up in an acting class. 

"My first role," she recalls, "was a 
comedy part in a one -act play. I was 
eighteen years old at the time. When I 
heard that first laugh, something hap- 
pened. I said to myself, That's it! I 
knew right then that I wanted to be- 
come a comedienne. But my family was 
horrified when I told them. No one in 
the family had ever been connected 
with show business. My mother told me 
flatly, 'Carol, you'll never make it.' 
But, eventually, they got over it and 
gave me their blessing." 

Although Carol has never pursued 
her early journalistic leanings, she does 
plan on writing a book when time is 
available. "It'll be about my grand- 
mother, Mae White, a truly fabulous 



woman. My mother was more like a 
sister to me than a mother, and my 
grandmother raised me. She lives in 
California now, and we're in touch all 
the time. 

"Just the other day, I received a let- 
ter from her in which she told me to 
stop telling my right age. I'm twenty- 
eight, but my grandmother thinks I 
should say that I'm twenty! Her life 
story would make a marvelous book 
and I'm going to try to write it one of 
these days. 

"I guess I wanted to be a writer when 
I was a kid because I wanted to create 
something. I still do. I help out with 
ideas for some of my comedy sketches, 
and I'm taking a course in cartooning. 
But I'll never be a serious writer, as 
such. There's too much ham in me. I 
like to hear those laughs." 

Carol's big break, before she became 
a regular on the Moore show in Octo- 
ber of 1959, came one day after a col- 
lege drama-class performance of 
"Annie Get Your Gun." A benefactor 
approached Carol and a fellow student 
named Don Saroyan and lent them 
each $1,000 to go to New York and get 
a start in show business. "It's the kind 
of a thing that doesn't happen!" Carol 
marvels. "But the only stipulations 
were that we'd pay back the money and 
that we'd help someone else to get a 
start when we were able to." 

Carol and Don went to New York in 
1954 and, a year later, they were mar- 
ried. With both of them striving for ca- 
reers, however, the marriage didn't 
work out. They separated in 1959. "Don 
and I get along better now than when 



we were living together," she says. "It's 
hard on a marriage when both husband 
and wife are working in such an un- 
predictable business as this one." 

Carol's first television assignment in 
New York was on ventriloquist Paul 
Winchell's children's program, on 
which she played the girlfriend of 
Winchell's dummy, Jerry Mahoney. 
This was followed by a short-lived 
comedy series with Buddy Hackett, as 
well as appearances on Garry Moore's 
morning program and on the Ed Sulli- 
van, Dinah Shore and Jack Paar shows. 

It was on Paar's program that she 
sang a satiric comedy song entitled "I 
Made a Fool of Myself Over John Fos- 
ter Dulles," which so amused the late 
Secretary of State that he requested a 
personal recording of it for himself. 

In May of 1959, Carol achieved one of 
her greatest ambitions. She opened in 
the starring role of a new musical, 
"Once Upon a Mattress," at the Phoe- 
nix Theater in New York. The show 
was one of the few productions in re- 
cent theatrical history to transfer suc- 
cessfully from off-Broadway to a Main 
Stem theater. In all, it ran for a year in 
New York. And, in the fall of that year, 
she joined Moore's nighttime show. 

"I've been lucky all my life," Carol 
says, "and I feel especially lucky to be 
associated with Garry Moore. He's a 
true gentleman. The spirit on this show 
is almost unbelievable. Everyone is so 
friendly. There are no feuds. We like 
each other, and that goes for the stage 
hands as well as the performers. 

"Garry never tries to hold anyone 
back. I don't have anything in mind 
right now, but if I want to do another 
Broadway show, it's okay with Garry. 
Not all bosses are that considerate. Ac- 
tually, Garry isn't a boss. We don't 
think of him that way." 

In addition to the stage and televi- 
sion, Carol has also made several 
night-club appearances, but she pre- 
fers not to work in that field. "I hate to 
compete with drinks and food. It's un- 
fair competition. Seriously, night clubs 
aren't for me. Most people go to them 
to be seen, not to be entertained." 

Carol and her sixteen-year-old sis- 
ter, Christine, share an apartment in 
Manhattan with their two Yorkshire 
terriers, "Bruce" and "Fang." Carol 
grins: "These dogs are really kooks. 
Bruce is a female. (Yes, a female. I 
told a friend in California that, if I ever 
had a dog, I'd name it after him. The 
first dog happened to be a girl dog, but 
I kept my promise.) The other one, 
Fang, is my toughest critic. He hates 
my singing. It makes him howl. Even 
when I hum, he howls." 

Carol recently recorded an album of 
show tunes ("Carol Burnett Remem- 
bers How They Stopped the Show") 
which has become a best-seller for 
Decca. "Although there are a few com- 
edy numbers, it isn't a comedy album. 



My type of comedy must be seen to be 
appreciated. You could say that the 
album is made up of straight songs." 

Sister Christine attends a private 
girls' school in New Jersey, joins Carol 
in New York on weekends and during 
vacation periods. "I'm not being a snob 
in sending Christine to a private 
school," Carol explains. "But with my 
unpredictable hours, I'm not able to 
give her the supervision that any teen- 
ager needs. Besides, in Jersey, she's 
able to breathe that good country air. 

"Christine, by the way, doesn't share 
my love for show business. She's a 
home girl. Wants to get married and 
raise a family, which is fine, of course. 
I've never tried to discourage her about 
show business. In fact, if she wanted to 
become a performer, I would encour- 
age her. 

"I don't understand performers who 
say they wouldn't permit their children 
to become entertainers. They them- 
selves are having a marvelous time, so 
what's so bad about the business for 
their kids? Certainly, there are wrong 
people, or bad people, in show business. 
But that doesn't mean you have to fall 
in with them and stay with them. There 
are wrong people in any business. I've 
never felt that I had to associate with 
the wrong crowd to further my career. 
I've been able to pick my own friends. 

"I've seen parents throw up their 
hands when they heard their son or 
daughter was going into show business. 
They should be pleased, not alarmed or 
disappointed. I don't want to sound 
kooky or corny, but there's no business 
like it!" 

As part of her "payment" to the 
benefactor who financed her trip to 
New York from the U.C.L.A. campus, 
Carol recently discovered and lent a 
helping hand to a young entertainer 
named Ken Berry. "I saw Ken in a 
West Coast revue called 'Billy Barnes' 
People.' It was last winter, when we 
were in California to tape one of the 
Garry Moore shows. I was so impressed 
by Ken's talent that I actually cried. 
Why, he sings, dances, and has a natu- 
ral comic flair. 

"I told Garry about him, and he was 
equally impressed. He brought Ken to 
New York and featured him on one of 
his April programs. Garry told the 
audience, 'I wish I could say that I dis- 
covered Ken Berry, but that honor be- 
longs to Carol Burnett.' Wasn't that 
nice? 

"I felt so very good about it. It was 
another chapter in my Cinderella story. 
Ken's own talent will take him to the 
top, but I helped a little to open the 
door. That's what makes life worth- 
while. Being able to help people. And 
that's why I'm so happy. In my own 
way, by making them laugh and forget 
their troubles for a while, I believe I'm 
helping people. And when they laugh, 
believe me, it helps me." 



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69 



The Advantages of Being Shy 



(Continued from page 35) 
a motion picture star. The two movies 
Joan Harvey has made — "Pretty Boy 
Floyd," and a new one, "The Answer" 
— came after TV and stage success in 
New York, not before. "Hollywood 
didn't think I had the right kind of 
face for movies. I definitely wasn't the 
starlet type." 

This only served to deepen Joan's 
youthful feelings of inadequacy. As a 
brunette, with enormous hazel eyes 
and masses of dark brown hair touched 
with natural reddish highlights, she 
felt inadequate because she wasn't one 
of the current crop of blondes. As a 
tallish girl, almost five-feet-six, she 
felt inadequate because she wasn't 
petite. 

Born in New York, she was the only 
child of parents who moved to the 
West Coast when she was three. 
Growing up in Hollywood was not the 
major spur toward an acting career. 
Five months in London were. Her fa- 
ther's work with "trailers," the short 
films which advertise coming movie 
attractions, took them to England when 
she was fourteen. "I got the chance to 
go to the Old Vic and to see a lot of 
live theater. To steep myself in the 
real art of acting. I had always been 
imaginative and when I felt very alone 
as a child — away at boarding schools 
or camp — I often made up my own 
games. I even dreamed up an imagi- 
nary girl friend. Being exposed to 
English theater intensified all the im- 
agination and the love of the dramatic 
that was already there." 

When Joan got back to California 
and was a student at Hollywood High, 
the memories remained strong within 
her. In both high school and at U.C.L.A., 
she began to work with small theater 
groups around town. She was noticed 
by a few people who said she had 
talent. "They could see I was shy and 
scared, but believed there was a chance 
for a new and sensitive face, even if I 
wasn't the usual Hollywood type." 

So she began to batter at studio 
doors. One of the first was Fred Zinne- 
man's, about the time he was doing 
"From Here to Eternity." Mr. Zinne- 
man inspired no false hopes in Joan. 
He said at once that she was too young 
for the part he was casting — she was 
barely seventeen then — "but he gave me 
something more important. He gave me 
courage. He has done that many times 
since, when I have gone to him for 
advice. 

' 'You are very shy,' he said to me, 
and explained that he had known what 
it was to be shy. He talked, a long time 
about the feelings of inadequacy that 
T beset a shy person. He said there were 
* two paths I could take, and I had to 
make the choice. I could continue to go 

on interviews, let what talent I had 
70 



'come through' and try to forget my- 
self. Or I could choose the other way, 
put on a sham personality to hide my 
shyness — cross my legs and wear too 
low-cut blouses. 'And don't do any of 
these things,' he warned. 'Don't ever be 
anyone but yourself.' " 

The advice helped, but it still wasn't 
easy. After Joan read for a part, she 
would get so flustered that usually she 
backed out of the room saying "Good- 
bye, goodbye, goodbye" repetitiously 
and nervously, wanting only to get 
away quickly. Twice, after readings, 
she found she had opened the wrong 
door and backed into a closet. Laugh- 
ter followed her in waves, and she 
had to come back into the room. 

At nineteen, Joan married Holly- 
wood writer and director Harvey Ben- 
nett Fishman (who, as a child, had 
been one of the brightest of the famous 
Quiz Kids) . The two were divorced not 
too long ago, after eight years of mar- 
riage. "We're still friends, but we 
found we weren't happy together any- 
more. When I flew out to Hollywood 
on short notice to make 'The Answer,' 
Harvey let me use his apartment there. 
He was coming to New York, at the 
time, so I let him have mine. When we 
separated, we split all our belongings 
down the middle, entirely amicably. 
The only thing we fought over was the 
dictionary! Harvey said he needed it 
because he is a writer. I said I needed 
it because I am an actress. He got it." 

Shortly after their marriage, and 
after Harvey had finished his Army 
service, they drove East. "He really 
made the change on my account, be- 
cause we both decided I would never 
make it in Hollywood. It took us weeks 
to get across the country. Harvey 
wanted to stop and read every roadside 
historical marker, see everything. I fi- 
nally got so involved myself that I was 
the one who began urging him to stop. 
We had a wonderful day at Gettys- 
burg. The night before, he gave me a 
whole history course on the battles 
there. He has made me realize the 
value of education — to know because it's 
fun to know." 

To know because it's fun, because it's 
stimulating and broadens the view- 
point, sent Joan back to college. She 
has been attending New York Univer- 
sity as many hours a week as pos- 
sible — plus one summer session — has 
close to three years toward her bache- 
lor's degree, wants to go on even after 
that. She had to drop one class to do 
an off-Broadway play, "Cry of the 
Raindrop," but got her professor to 
excuse her ten minutes early from an- 
other, every evening, so she could make 
curtain at the theater. 

In Hollywood, Joan's only acting ex- 
perience was in what might be called 



" 'way off Hollywood Boulevard." She 
played small parts in such little-theater 
productions as "Androcles and the 
Lion" — in which she walked around in 
scanty clothes, held a bowl of grapes, 
and never opened her mouth. In New 
York, she was working at paying jobs 
within a month. During the first year, 
she had about fifteen "extra" parts on 
TV. "I was always the farthest from 
the camera. I didn't want anyone to 
recognize me in such a role, but it was 
good money and good training." 

Joan came to the conclusion that, if 
she did one more extra's job, she would 
never get a real part. It was hard to 
turn down money when it was needed — 
but when the telephone rang and she 
was wanted as an extra on a Robert 
Montgomery show, she found herself 
being courageous enough to say, "I'm 
not taking those parts any more." Two 
weeks later, this paid off. They gave 
her her first speaking role. 

Strangely enough, although she could 
ride horseback before she walked and 
has taught riding to others, to keep go- 
ing as an actress during lean periods, 
no one has ever given Joan a part in a 
Western for either television or mov- 
ies. She even rides bareback, has in- 
structed friends in riding when they 
got parts requiring it. "But not one 
person has ever let me use my own 
skills as an expert horsewoman." 

Being in New York, getting a start 
in professional work, seemed to help 
Joan's shyness. "I got more and more 
courage. People have understood, and 
it is this kind of understanding which 
has kept me in the business." She got 
her first experience in a daily serial 
when she had a brief running role on 
Search For Tomorrow. She has done 
several off-Broadway plays, and was 
understudy to Gena Rowlands on 
Broadway in "The Middle of the 
Night," starring Edward G. Robinson. 

She also understudied the kid-sister 
part and got a chance to go on in that 
role — her first appearance on the 
Broadway stage. Then, on the road 
tour, she played Gena's role, the femi- 
nine lead, opposite Sam Levene. When 
Levene starred on Broadway in "Make 
A Million," Joan played the important 
part of his ex-wife. 

The Edge Of Night called her a cou- 
ple of times when Teal Ames, who 
played Sara, was ill. She always re- 
fused, thinking such substitutions would 
hurt her chances of getting a part of 
her own on the show. At one point, she 
was called for one they were just cast- 
ing, but it was decided that she looked 
too young. Then, when she was tapped 
for the role of Judy, it was thought she 
might look a little too mature! 

"When I went for the final reading, 
with the client present, they took me 
into another room, put my hair in a 



pony-tail, told me to wipe off the lip- 
stick — and there I was, amazed to find 
myself looking about eighteen. The 
client okayed me. The funniest side of 
this is that I have never worn my hair 
in a pony-tail on the show, and the 
story line kept making me a little older. 
After I was married to Ed Gibson in 
the script, and lost the baby, it was 
right for me to be just about my real 
age. 

"There's so much fun on our show. 
A complete lack of tension. Larry Hag- 
man, who plays my husband Ed, is so 
real. There's a sensitivity in Larry that 
I haven't seen in many actors, yet he 
has great strength. I don't often get a 
chance to see one of our scenes, be- 
cause the show is live. But when one 
show had to be taped last fall and I 
watched it later from home, I cried 
during a scene between Larry and me! 
It was like watching two other people. 

"It's all very real to us. Mary Martin, 
Larry's own mother, telephoned one 



day. 'You are going to lose your baby,' 
she said sadly — and suddenly she was 
crying. And, when I married Larry on 
the show, his real wife, Maj, sent me 
flowers. The card read, 'He is the nicest 
husband in the world and I hope you 
will enjoy him, too.' " 

At the beginning, Joan's greatest 
problem on The Edge of Night — where 
new lines have to be learned for each 
performance — was the teleprompter. 
"Along with shyness goes insecurity, 
and I was terribly concerned that the 
very day I might get rattled, and forget 
a line, would also be the day the tele- 
prompter might not be running! So I 
had to build up reliance on myself, 
and that is good." 

Joan has now proved that shyness 
need not be the drawback some girls 
think it is. Usually, it makes you work 
harder for what you want. Often, it 
brings out an attitude of understand- 
ing and helpfulness in others which 
makes life happier for everyone. 



r - high ■ - 



Bull winkle: The Moose with the Most 



(Continued from page 25) 
the theater's red-carpeted entrance, 
the most famous stars were met with 
stony silence. But the lesser-known 
members of the press were saluted with 
wild applause and cheering — supplied 
by an off-stage sound track. Each was 
greeted at the microphone by a master 
of ceremonies nattily attired in white 
tie, tails, Bermuda shorts and sneakers. 

The Bullwinkle Show (including its 
rib-tickling, pomposity-pricking pre- 
miere) is the proud preparation of Jay 
Ward Productions, a firm built around 
Jay Ward and Bill Scott. Remarkably 
similar in looks, build, age and an any- 
thing-for-a-laugh approach to life, this 
Tweedledum-Tweedledee pair are hard 
to pin down to specifics. When someone 
does manage to get them settled to- 
gether for any brief period, he comes 
away with the impression of having 
witnessed a game of table tennis — with 
himself as the ball. 

The best description of the two is the 
one they give of themselves: "I look 
like the guard on a losing football team 
of ten years ago," says Jay. "I remind 
people of the meat-and-poultry man at 
the A & P," says Bill. 

San Francisco-born Jay is a graduate 
of the University of California and the 
Harvard School of Business. While sell- 
ing real estate in 1947, he came up with 
the idea for Crusader Rabbit, sold the 
show to TV, then returned to the real- 
estate business. In 1957, he created 
Rocky — and, this time, gave up the 
business world for good. 

Bill reversed Jay's eastward trek. 
Born in Philadelphia, he went West to 
the University of Denver. After gradua- 
tion, he went on to Hollywood, worked 



on "Bugs Bunny" and "Daffy Duck," 
graduated to writing and producing 
Time For Beany (one of TV's first hit 
puppet shows), then moved to the 
"Mister Magoo" series and the "Ger- 
ald McBoing-Boing" show, which won 
an Academy Award as best cartoon of 
the year. 

Jay Ward Productions consists of a 
host of creative talents, including six 
other writers, five directors, a spate of 
animators and some of the most able 
delineators of various voices in show 
business, including Paul Frees, Hans 
Conried, June Foray, Mel Blanc, Louis 
Nye, Don Knotts, Charles Ruggles, Bill 
Conrad, Alan Reed and Walter Tetley. 

It should not be surprising to learn 
that the firm has no president. "We're 
all vice-presidents," Jay and Bill an- 
nounce. In the same straight-faced 
manner, they go on to discuss the man 
they consider most important to their 
organization— Ponsonby Britt, chairman 
of the board. "We needed him," says 
Jay, producing a prepared biography of 
their esteemed leader. "He had the 
money. He's head of the Widows and 
Orphans Benevolent Fund." 

A harried publicity man hastens to 
explain that there is no such person 
as Ponsonby Britt, that he is just a 
name dreamed up by the kookie pair 
for a gag. "We decided to invent him 
because we thought the enterprise 
needed a touch of class," Bill admits. 

Like Rocky And His Friends, from 
which it sprang, The Bullwinkle Show 
is classified by the network as a "chil- 
dren's show" — a fact which puzzles its 
producers. "We feel it's adult humor, 
but NBC can't understand the jokes, 
so they think it's a children's show," 



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71 



says Jay. "A lot has to do with the 
fact that our drawing is much simpler 
than that of the average cartoon show. 

"Since we're drawing for the smaller 
screen, this is much more effective — 
because subtle movements that come 
across so well on movie screens are lost 
on television. It also makes for a faster 
pace. We have about three times as 
much dramaturgy per minute as the 
average show. That gives us twice as 
many jokes, and we think it takes a 
person of more intelligence to catch 
'em all." 

"Yeah," Bill interposes. "We think it 
takes somebody like twelve years old to 
appreciate it." (He himself is forty- 
one.) 

"Seriously, though," says Jay (who's 
forty), "we don't want to knock kids. 
They're pretty sharp today, nothing like 
we were as kids. They're smarter, more 
up-to-date and more educated from 
watching so much TV." 

A serious mood, however, cannot sur- 
round the irrepressible pair for long. 
"We're often asked why we made Bull- 
winkle a moose," says Bill. "The best 
answer we can give is, 'Why not?' " 

"We're also asked if we pattern our 
characters after real people," Jay adds. 
"Of course we do. They're all takeoffs 
on real people. Look around you. It's 
been said that Bullwinkle comes across 
like Clem Kadiddlehopper, but we 



didn't intentionally pattern him after 
that Red Skelton characterization. Bull- 
winkle's a smart sort of dope, like Clem 
or Mortimer Snerd or a character out 
of Artemus Ward. He's a very simple 
guy who comes up with smart cracks. 

"Occasionally, we do satirize people 
in our minor characters. On one epi- 
sode of our 'Fractured Fairy Tales,' for 
instance, we did the story of Sleeping 
Beauty. For the prince, we drew a 
caricature of Walt Disney. Which 
makes it pretty funny when he comes 
in to wake the princess with a kiss, 
suddenly stops and says, 'Awake, she's 
just another princess — but asleep, she's 
a gold mine.' Next scene shows him 
selling tickets to see her. 

"Then we have things like the Kur- 
ward Derby, which will be a running 
gag in the series. It's a derby hat which 
makes its wearer the smartest man in 
the world. Did we name it after some- 
one in particular? Of course not." Here, 
Jay gives a sly wink. "But what else 
would you name a derby? They've 
already used 'Kentucky.' 

"Our main characters are basically 
characterizations of people in general 
and of types, more than just anybody 
specifically. For example, Boris Bade- 
nov is our villain and he's all bad. 
Rocky, our other hero, plays it straight 
and is all good. It's all a takeoff and 
satire on melodrama. 



"We once even had a crooked guy 
named Murgatroyd Cornelius Apple- 
finger who opened a talent agency 
under his initials of M.C.A. Everybody 
knew that was a jab at Music Corpora- 
tion of America, the biggest agency of 
them all. 

"Nobody and nothing is really safe if 
we think we can poke a little fun. We've 
done it to the Army, the Navy, the Air 
Force, the Federal Communications 
Commission — even to our sponsor, Gen- 
eral Mills. We did one bit about coun- 
terfeit boxtops that almost destroyed 
the world's economy — which we de- 
picted as being based on boxtops. 

"In our episodes about 'Mr. Pea- 
body's Improbable History,' we ascribe 
different motives to our heroes. We sel- 
dom have trouble. But they wouldn't 
let us do the Wright Brothers. We 
wanted to show that it took them so 
long to get off the ground because they 
couldn't count past 'two' to start the 
propeller on the count of 'three.' 

"We have not only offended people — 
without meaning to, of course— but 
we've also had trouble with countries. 
The story of Pancho Villa almost got us 
into a jam with Mexico. And, this fall, 
we've introduced a new character, 
Dudley Do-Right of the Mounties. I 
think he may be the hit of the show — 
and I won't be surprised if we're at war 
with Canada over him within the year." 



The Unpredictable Brian Kelly 



(Continued from page 17) 
would be breaking up a close friend- 
ship. In typical Kelly fashion, Brian 
magnanimously gave the dog to Gard- 
ner on the spot. One salient point: Gar 
had good reason to grow attached to 
Pussycat: Brian's "weekend visit" to 
Detroit had lasted jour months. 
But that isn't unusual — for him. 
Almost everything Brian Kelly does 
is a little unpredictable. His acting ca- 
reer itself is somewhat implausible, 
considering his background. The husky 
ex-Marine almost didn't attempt it at 
all. He returned to his studies after 
serving in Korea, and was about to 
enter the final year of the University of 
Michigan Law School, when the acting 
bug bit him for good. He gave it all up, 
set out for Hollywood and, within a 
year and a half, was laboring as third 
lead in the detective series 21 Beacon 
Street. Now, as co-star of Straightaway, 
Kelly's career seems assured. 

He did it all so casually, it seems 
almost accidental. Yet handsome Brian, 
with the devil-may-care Irish look, is 
a dedicated actor. "He's a lightning 
rod," one director said recently. "Any- 
T thing that happens on the set means 
v something to him. There's electricity in 
the air on a good show, and Brian picks 

it all up and stores it. He never forgets 
72 



anything a director tells him. He's 
amazing." 

It's not amazing when you consider 
Brian was a top student, all through 
school, and filled out a busy academic 
success with superiority on the playing 
fields. His high-school athletic prowess 
was legend around Detroit. He played 
football and baseball outstandingly 
well, led his classes in scholastic 
averages. 

There was no reason for any of this 
to go to his head — not with five broth- 
ers and sisters at home, all doing just 
as well. And his family wasn't just 
starting on the road to fame and for- 
tune. His father, the Hon. Harry F. 
Kelly, was Governor of the state of 
Michigan from 1942 to 1948 and is now 
a member of the Michigan Supreme 
Court. The Kellys of Detroit are quite 
well-known. Brian didn't embark on an 
acting career to find an identity for 
himself. He already had very strong 
identification, right in Detroit. 

His desire to act goes much deeper. 
"I wanted to be an actor ever since I 
can remember," he'll comment now, 
"but I never admitted it to anybody, 
not even myself." He did appear in 
several high-school productions, but 
everyone tried out for those. That the 
handsome son of Governor Kelly was 



rather good in the lead of the senior 
play didn't surprise anyone. 

Notre Dame beckoned, and Brian 
hoped to repeat his high school grid- 
iron success. But, during the first prac- 
tice of the freshman football squad, the 
fast-stepping Kelly got blocked ef- 
fectively by two monstrous candidates 
for the Notre Dame line — and his knee 
was never the same again. Heartbreak - 
ingly, his athletic adventures came to 
an end that autumn afternoon. He has 
built the knee up in the intervening 
years and, last winter, was again in top 
shape for skiing, his all-time favorite 
sport. But it took exercises and con- 
stant determination. 

One 21 Beacon Street sequence called 
for Brian to turn and run out of a 
hoodlum-filled room. In turning, his 
knee slipped out and he was in ex- 
cruciating pain for several minutes. 
Rather than ruin the scene, which in- 
volved many extra players, Brian 
walked resolutely out of the scene, then 
collapsed in agony as the director yelled 
"Cut!" Helped to a chair by several 
burly grips, Brian snapped his leg back 
in himself, limped a moment or two, 
and walked into the next scene. "Never 
give in to your own weaknesses," he 
admonishes — and lives up to it, too. 

With all the inner strength Brian has, 



it is still doubtful that he would have 
followed his muse to Hollywood if it 
hadn't been for several accidental fac- 
tors. During his undergraduate years at 
Notre Dame, he had filled in as an an- 
nouncer on a Detroit radio station. 
Even in his teens, he had the deep, 
well-modulated voice that identifies 
Scott Ross of Straightaway. For extra 
spending money, he did commercials 
for one of the big automotive firms. 

After Korea, when Brian was in De- 
troit for any time away from the law 
school, he made several times his 
weekly allowance showing the merits of 
a late-model sedan on local TV sta- 
tions. One evening, as he was picking 
up some books he'd set down on the set 
while doing his commercial stint, a 
representative from a modeling agency 
approached him. "You're as collegiate 
as anyone I've ever seen," the man 
opened. "How would you like to pose as 
a college student for an ad? It'll be 
well worth your while." 

Brian hedged at first. Knowing the 
kidding he received from his family for 
his commercials, the thought of what 
an advertisement might do was dev- 
astating. Still, it was very good pay, 
and he wanted to be on his own. In 
time, the agency sent for him to come 
out to their base of operations in Holly- 
wood. It was a chance he'd been wait- 
ing for, but Brian was scared. 

Facing thousands of suicidal Chinese 
as a young lieutenant on the bloody 
slopes of Korea, Brian had never been 
as apprehensive as he was the night 
he had to decide whether or not to go 
West. He was doing very well at the 
law school and, naturally, his family 
and friends felt he'd be as renowned a 
figure in that profession as his father. 
But Hollywood won out, and his family 
was wonderful. "They went right along 
with it," he says, still awed by their 
understanding. 

Once in Hollywood, things happened 
quickly. Adept behind the camera, as 
well as in the spotlights, Brian soon 
was shooting pictures of his own for 
advertising. His modeling and picture- 
taking kept him well-fed and busy, but 
not so busy as to be overlooked by 
casting agents. Soon he was making 
appearances in syndicated TV shows. 
The shows weren't well-known and the 
parts were small, but Brian worked 
hard at every one. It was the most ex- 
citing thing he'd ever known and he 
realized, for once and for all, the direc- 
tion he wanted his life to take. 

Hollywood offered another delightful 
compensation for leaving the fulfillment 
of a law career behind: Girls! There 
were hundreds of them. And Brian, one 
of the best-looking young actors in 
town, got to know most of them. Since 
he was working as a photographer and 
as a model, he had a date-book listing 
hundreds of beauties — and his acting 



career added many new names. He had 
never considered leaving the happy 
unattached status early in life. His first 
year in Hollywood convinced him he 
would never marry. 

Brian's popularity with the fair sex 
isn't based solely on his looks or col- 
legiate charm. The girl he's out with 
never knows what's going to happen 
next. For that matter, neither does 
Brian. One night, dining with Johnny 
Ashley, his co-star from Straightaway, 
Brian felt in need of feminine compan- 
ionship. John was content to concen- 
trate on his lasagne, but Brian had that 
faraway look in his eyes. "We've got to 
have a girl here," he said. 

"Come on, eat up," urged John, "we'll 
find dates after supper." No, this didn't 
make sense to the impulsive Kelly. 
Getting up unexpectedly, he wandered 
out onto the boulevard, spotted an at- 
tractive young lady walking a minia- 
ture French poodle. 

"That dog!" he said, approaching her. 

"What's wrong with 'that dog'?" the 
girl wanted to know. 

"He looks underfed," came the an- 
swer. Needless to say, the girl turned on 
her four-inch heels and walked away. 

Brian went back into the restaurant 
and brooded for a moment or two. 
"What's wrong?" John Ashley wanted 
to know. "I can't get that poor thing 
out of my mind," answered Brian. 

"That beautiful blonde?" John asked 
logically. "No, that dog"— and, with 
that, the unpredictable Kelly was off 
again, returning this time practically 
carrying the poor girl. 

"This dog just has to have a square 
meal," declared Brian, and proceeded 
to order a meal for the dog and its 
pretty mistress. 

He soon had the girl in hysterics, 
checking the dog's eyes, coat, even 
teeth. She was so enthralled that, the 
next day, she came out to the Straight- 
away set to visit Brian and John. It's 
hard to stay mad at Brian Kelly very 
long in the face of his zany antics. 

Naturally, he has a serious side, but 
he keeps it from his social life. He lives 
in a very modern home perched on the 
side of one of the Beverly Hills canyons. 
Late into the night, lights can be seen 
burning brightly there while ex-law- 
student Kelly keeps up with current 
events, the law, and his new love, the 
theater. He has read almost every con- 
temporary study of the drama. 

All this never intrudes on the per- 
sonality his friends and fans know, 
however. As one cameraman said, "He's 
never down, always cheery. In this 
game, that's a gift." 

His preference for actresses as dates 
has prevailed, even after several years 
in Hollywood. He once avoided any 
serious linking with the glamour girls 
he squired, but his current interest — 
beautiful Laura Devon, a singer — looks 
serious. In fact, friends are now daring 



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to predict that the "unpredictable" 
Kelly will be a bridegroom early in 
1962! 

Now that Brian has a weekly series 
to shoot — and steady dates to keep — his 
tendency toward sudden trips has be- 
come more limited. No more quick ex- 
cursions to Canada for skiing, or 
Mexico for skin diving. Hard to say, 
though, that Brian Kelly is getting 
stodgy because of it! While on location 
for a segment of the show in Florida, 
Brian and John Ashley were sitting in 
a motel room deciding what to do for 
the weekend. Brian was studying the 
airline rate card in front of him. 

"You know something, John?" he 
suddenly brightened. "It wouldn't cost 
us any more to go direct to Mexico than 
to go back to Los Angeles." John, who 
knew what was coming, groaned in- 
wardly. 

Sure enough, within hours, the pair 
were in Acapulco. After a delightful 
weekend at one of the swankiest hotels, 
they discovered that neither had 
thought to bring any traveler's checks. 
Their cash was low. The hotel wouldn't 
take a personal check, and they had to 
be in Hollywood the next morning to 
resume shooting. But, instead of worry- 
ing, the two went down to the hotel 
dining room and ate a gigantic lunch. 
While there, one of the guests in the 
hotel whose acquaintance they had 
made happened to mention the tre- 
mendous price American liquor brought 
in a certain part of Acapulco. 

Within moments, the nattily-dressed 
Kelly was wandering through the 
oldest part of Acapulco, seeking a 
buyer for some excellent Scotch which 
had been a present from a friend in 
Florida. The sale was made and the two 
stars paid their hotel bill and made 
their plane. "He was never even 
ruffled," John recalls. "You can't shake 
him." 

Another friend considers his winter 
vacation with Brian last year typical 
of the man. They were about to leave 
for the Frozen North to ski, when Brian 
found he couldn't get all his heavy 
sweaters into his new luggage. Without 
batting an eye, he pulled out all the 
heavy clothing, threw bathing suits and 
swimming gear into the same bag — and, 
within an hour, they were winging 
South of the Border. The friend wasn't 
surprised . . . he'd even brought swim- 
ming trunks himself — just in case. 

Brian isn't being difficult, he's just 
being himself. And his friendship is so 
highly valued among the young actors 
and actresses in Hollywood that it's 
obvious his independence is appealing 
. . . even in an independent town like 
Hollywood, Brian Kelly is "the person- 
alities' personality." 

It doesn't impress him. As long as he 
can act — and do what he wants, when 
he isn't acting — he'll be happy. 



The Networks' Answer: Juvenile Shows 



(Continued from page 19) 
the sort of fare Newton Minow would 
approve. And, to present these shows, 
the networks have chosen personable, 
brilliant, youthful reporters who have 
packed an amazing amount of adven- 
ture and experience into their few years 
so far. 

Update's Robert Abernethy, the sen- 
ior of the group, was trained as a social 
scientist and became a reporter, he 
says, "because I liked talking to people 
and telling things to people." And, since 
Bob has been in twenty countries, he 
has much to tell. His travels started 
soon after his birth in Geneva, Switz- 
erland, thirty-three years ago. His 
father, an editor for the International 
Y.M.C.A.'s World Youth magazine, re- 
turned to Washington and Bob attended 
Hill School in Pottstown, Pennsylvania. 

He interrupted his studies at Prince- 
ton University to serve with the Army 
in Japan, where he edited a weekly 
newspaper and broadcast news. He re- 
ceived his bachelor's degree in 1950. 
After doing a social-science study for 
the Army in Korea, he took his mas- 
ter's degree in public affairs at Prince- 
ton in 1952, then joined NBC. 

Bob is a specialist in military and 
scientific news whose assignments have 
taken him around the world. He did a 
three-year tour of duty in London. He 
filed the first story of the Anglo-French 
invasion of Port Said and was also the 
first to break the story of the selec- 
tion of the American astronauts. As 
his current regular assignment, he cov- 
ers the United States Senate and the 
activities of Vice-President Lyndon B. 
Johnson. 

Update's format is exactly Bob Aber- 
nethy's cup of tea. Its thirty minutes 
are divided into segments: Top story of 
the day, a student reporter's interview 
of a prominent person, a feature story, 
a report from an NBC foreign cor- 
respondent, the "update" of a previ- 
ous top story, and news of the hour. 
"For once," says Bob, "we have time 
enough to go into things. Often, when 
I work on our regular fifteen-minute 
news shows, I think that a person 
would need to have read the teletypes 
all day to know what it's all about." 

He credits his small daughter, Jane, 
with giving him an unexpected lesson 
in reporting: "She was at my heels, the 
morning I brought in the paper and 
first got the news that the Russians had 
resumed nuclear testing. I said, 'Oh, 
for God's sake . . .' and she said, 'What's 
the matter, Daddy?' Well, just try ex- 
plaining to a four-and-a-half-year-old 
what a bomb is and why people drop 
bombs on each other. It's a grim and 
frightening experience." 

It influenced his approach to Update. 
"I realized how old kids get, these days, 
at a young age. I think we should try 



to report the real world as thoroughly 
as we can without creating a totally 
terrifying picture. I'm not preaching, 
but I believe there should be some ele- 
ment of hope and uplift. Young people 
need to know that there is still charm 
and fun to be found in human beings." 

Members of ABC's crew for Ameri- 
can Newsstand are but little older than 
their viewers. Roger Sharp, the anchor 
man, finds wry humor in the fact that 
he has reached the advanced age of 
twenty-six. "All my working life, I've 
had editors, sponsors and producers say 
to me, 'Sure, you're a good reporter — 
but you look too young. Can't you 
bleach a streak of white in your hair?' 
Now I have the opposite problem of 
trying to stay looking as young as our 
audience!" 

He was born in Akron, Ohio, May 24, 
1935. His father, an advertising execu- 
tive, encouraged him to work on school 
and college newspapers. Roger attended 
Monteith School in Detroit and took his 
college training at Michigan State, 
Wayne University and the University 
of Miami. He married Joan Churilla in 
Detroit, and they now live in Manhat- 
tan with their children, John, five, and 
Karen, four. 

Documentaries he did on Cuba won 
awards for Roger. They also brought 
him first-hand knowledge of conditions 
in a Cuban jail. "On my first trip, I 
met Castro," he recalls, "but my re- 
port didn't cause too much commotion 
— largely, I suppose, because things 
were still unresolved. I came there the 
second time in March, 1960, just after 
that munitions ship was blown up and 
they started blaming the United States. 

"I got permission to make pictures, 
then wham! three guards were on me 
and I was in the clink, the second news- 
man to be jailed. I was working for the 
group of stations which includes Tulsa's 
KOTV and, after I had spent a day in 
jail, an American congressman who 
happened to be in Cuba got me out." 

Roger gained his first knowledge of 
Europe by doing a month-long tour of 
American military bases in France and 
West Germany. He made a second trip 
last summer and was in Berlin the day 
the Soviets started building the wall. 
He was also present when Vice-Presi- 
dent Johnson arrived to reassure Ber- 
liners of our support. 

Two new reporters, David Jayne and 
Bill Lord, took their masters' degrees 
in journalism last summer and were 
hired especially for Newsstand. David 
was born in Elizabeth, New Jersey, 
February 28, 1937. His father, a chem- 
ist, is now an executive at American 
Cyanamid and the family lives in 
Greenwich, Connecticut. 

Dave took his B.A. at Williams, then 
enlisted in the Marine Corps, where he 



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was assigned to the public information 
office and discovered he liked to write 
and do radio reporting. On discharge, 
he took his M.A. at Columbia Univer- 
sity's School of Journalism. Dave is 
single and recently took an apartment 
in Greenwich Village. He lists as his 
primary personal interests: "A particu- 
lar girl, politics and sports." 

Bill Lord, M.A., University of Penn- 
sylvania, 1960, was born at Saco, Maine, 
in 1937. Weekends, his high-school 
English teacher worked as transcription 



engineer at a local radio station. The 
pay for the stint was one dollar. When 
the station cut it to seventy-five cents, 
the teacher quit — and Bill took the job. 

He studied communications at Bos- 
ton University, has worked at WGBH 
in that city and made a European re- 
porting tour for WJDA, Quincy, Massa- 
chusetts. Bill is married to Deborah 
Gude of Laurel, Maryland. 

Roger Sharp summarizes the chal- 
lenge American Newsstand holds for 
all of them: "On lecture tours, I have 



found that a high-school group asks 
me much sharper, more perceptive 
questions than, say, members of a busi- 
nessmen's luncheon club. Students have 
a real interest in what happens in the 
world." 

It's a challenge for both networks, 
but one which they are solving with 
typical enthusiasm and resourcefulness. 
The resulting programs go far toward 
installing a brilliant, steady beacon for 
youthful viewers in what the F.C.C. 
chairman called "a vast wasteland." 



Jackie Gleason: A Father at Last 



(Continued from page 15) 
take them wherever they wanted to go. 
Both said they missed the pizzas in 
New York. "Great!" said Jackie, "I'll 
take you to the best pizza parlor in the 
world." 

He bundled them into his car and 
drove to a pizza joint on East 83rd 
Street. Linda, smacking her lips, 
ordered a pizza with anchovies and all 
the trimmings. Then Geraldine ordered 
a super-deluxe, scrumptious one, with 
sausages. "And what will you have, 
Mr. Gleason?" asked the waiter. Jackie, 
on one of his perennial diets, replied: 
"I'll have two soft-boiled eggs." 

"How can you come to a pizza place 
and order soft-boiled eggs?" asked 
Geraldine with astonishment. "I'll have 
you know," said Jackie, "that this place 
makes the best soft-boiled eggs in the 
universe." Geraldine smiled, patted her 
father's ample belly and said: "How 
would you know about that?" 

The young ladies got a first-hand 
look at their dad's easy-spending ways 
on the night he squired them to El 
Morocco. At the end of the evening, 
Jackie called for the check and then 
peeled off two hundred-dollar bills as a 
tip for the waiter. Gleason's daughters 
looked on in amazement. The waiter 
stammered out his thanks but Jackie 
stopped him. "What was the biggest tip 
you ever received before this?" 

"A hundred dollars," said the waiter. 

"And who slipped you the hundred?" 

"You did, Mr. Gleason," replied the 
waiter. Jackie smiled happily. 

Actually, both of Gleason's girls have 

inherited his flair for the dramatic, or at 

least his flair for drama. Two years ago, 

Jackie said: "Linda has always shown 

talent for the stage. I think she'll make 

it. Geraldine has already been offered 

movie contracts by Paramount, MGM 

and 20th Century. Those were made 

strictly on the basis of her work in 

school plays. However, I've talked her 

out of signing at this time. I advised her 

to wait until she can get some profes- 

t sional stage experience on Broadway 

v or in summer stock." 
■ 

At Marymount College in California, 

Geraldine starred in "Roberta." Free- 
76 



man Gosden, of the Amos 'n' Andy 
team, saw her and told Jackie: "She's 
great. She looks like she's been in show 
business all her life." Jimmy Durante 
and Bob Hope also caught the produc- 
tion and were very impressed with 
Geraldine's performance. Bob even 
made plans to use her in a TV special. 

However, all that can be forgotten 
now. Geraldine confided to friends at 
the wedding reception that she plans to 
be nothing more than a housewife. She 
is giving up her acting ambitions. The 
decision isn't likely to upset her father. 
In 1955, Jackie told a writer: "Show 
business is like a disease. You wouldn't 
want your kids to catch it, but there's 
very little you can do about it." 

Linda, it seems, will pursue her 
career. She's very conscious of being 
the daughter of one of the world's great 
comedians. When Jackie was in Holly- 
wood some twelve years ago, he took 
Linda to the set of the film, The Cisco 
Kid. She wore a cowboy suit and had 
her picture taken with the late Leo 
Carillo. When the picture was published 
a few weeks later, on a magazine cover, 
Linda hid the copy. Someone asked her 
why. "I don't want Daddy to see it," 
she explained in all seriousness. "After 
all, he might feel bad, having never 
made Variety's front page." 

Jackie's wife, too, must have felt she 
was constantly competing against her 
husband's love for show business and 
its gratifications. The comic himself 
says: "It wasn't success that caused the 
rift between us, because it all began 
when I was out of a job and broke. The 
best I can say is that it was all my fault. 
I guess I wasn't wise or mature enough 
to recognize what a fine lady I married. 
Genevieve liked the quiet life — home, 
fireside and kiddies. I liked the loud life 
— show business, the laughs, the late 
hours." 

The Gleasons would have celebrated 
their twenty-fifth wedding anniversary 
last September — if their marriage 
hadn't started to deteriorate five years 
after they said their "I do's." In 1943, 
the pair separated in Los Angeles and 
Genevieve was awarded $400 a month 



maintenance. They reconciled for a 
time, in 1948. But, in 1951, the marriage 
broke up for good. By 1954, Jackie was 
paying fifteen percent of his annual 
salary to Genevieve for support of her- 
self and the children. 

It was a legal separation, and not a 
divorce. "We are Catholics," Jackie said 
at the time, "and the church does not 
recognize divorce. We can't hope for an 
annulment, because we have no valid 
grounds for one. In the eyes of the 
church, I will always be married to Gen 
and that means I will never remarry." 

At Geraldine's nuptials, some of 
Jackie's pals saw a faint glimmer of 
hope that the forty-six-year-old come- 
dian would be reconciled with Gene- 
vieve. They noticed Bishop Fulton J. 
Sheen, who officiated at the wedding, 
talking with the pair. They knew that 
Bishop Sheen was a close friend of 
Jackie's, and they guessed that he was 
attempting to bring them together. 

Jackie's cronies also couldn't help ob- 
serving that Rev. James Stone was 
present, too — the parish priest who had 
performed the rites when Jackie and 
Gen were wed on September 20, 1936. 
But Jackie squelched the reconciliation 
talk, at Geraldine's $35,000 wedding 
reception in the Waldorf-Astoria, by 
whispering to an intimate pal that 
neither he nor Gen was remotely con- 
sidering making a go of it again. 

Today, the pair remain friendly to- 
ward each other, but that's about all. 
It now appears that the next time Glea- 
son and "the three loveliest girls in the 
world" meet under the same roof will 
be when Linda marries — and not be- 
fore then. 

In the meantime, Jackie will pursue 
the active life he loves best. Possessed 
of enormous energy, he plans new 
movies, new TV spectaculars, new 
Broadway plays, new phonograph al- 
bums. He is seen currently in all the 
night clubs, enjoying life to the hilt. He 
occupies the center of the stage which 
he prefers. Wherever he goes, his 
friends gather around. He has many of 
them. 

But there must be times when he feels 
like the loneliest man in the world. 




O/V THE RECORD 



JANUARY 1962 



Don Mills 
Music Editor 



MUSIC: the Gift understood by all 



• The language of music is understood 
the world over. What better way to 
communicate with your friends and 
loved ones than through the gift of 
music — especially at this time of year, 
when the spirit of the season work? 
toward bringing people closer together. 
The revered cellist, Pablo Casals, says 
music is "a divine way to tell beautiful, 
poetic things to the heart." Isn't that 
what we try to do at Christmas time — 
to express the beautiful and noble 
thoughts often left unsaid the rest of 
the year? 

Why not share a musical message 
this Christmas with those you care for 
most. There are suitable musical ex- 
pressions of your thoughts and senti- 
ments on record for every person you 
know, every close friend, acquaintance 
or business associate. 

To help you select the gift that comes 
closest to expressing your thoughts for. 
or your kinship with those you want to 
be remembered by, On The Record 
has compiled a list of Christmas gift 
suggestions on records. They are ar- 
ranged by categories of musical tastes 
rather than personal relationships, such 
as Father, Sister or Boss, to give you a 
more accurate and handier checklist. 

We have tried to concentrate our 
suggestions on the new records released 
for this Christmas season, so that you 
can be fairly assured that your gift has 
not already found its way into your 
friend's home. But certainly many 
other excellent records that have been 
available for a while will make equally 
appropriate gifts. In fact, the entire 
On The Record section could be con- 
sidered a Christmas gift list. Just take 
a look at the following pages and see 
the wonderful variety of records that 
await your friends' and your listening 
pleasure. 




AT THE YEAR'S END: 
A REVIEW AND PREVIEW 



• The exciting record business this 
year included steps forward and back- 
ward, with a few sidesteps. There were 
many new dance steps, which teenagers 
jinvented as fast as you could heel-and- 
toe. And at year's end one of them — 
"The Twist" — caught the fancy of the 
nation's well-heeled, and finally became 
what journalists call a "dance craze." 



Everybody was doing The Twist. 

Comedy LP's became a huge success, 
with the spicy ones also gaining ac- 
ceptance, possibly because of the bland 
humor of TV and films. A Negro comic. 
Dick Gregory, set a precedent by break- 
ing into a field which had previously 
relied on white entertainers, while Moms 
Mabley gained {Continued on 76H) 



T 

v 
R 

76A 




ON THE RECORD 



GIFT SUGGESTIONS FOR EVERYONE YOU KNOW 




• On The Record presents on this page 
a Christmas gift guide to outstanding 
new records that will be sure to please 
your family and friends. These sugges- 
tions, as well as other records men- 
tioned in this section, should supply 
you with gift ideas to suit the most dis- 
criminating taste. So happy Christmas 
shopping to you all! 

FOR THE 
GENERAL RECORD FAN 

Certainly a big gift item this Christmas 
will be the different versions of West 
Side Story available (listed as this 
month's "Hottest LP's") . . . The Nat 
King Cole Story (Capitol WCL 1613) 
makes a handsome gift for most anyone 
(See page 76H) . . . Judy at Carnegie 
Hall (Capitol WBO 1569) can't miss 
. . . And any of Mitch Miller's Sing-a- 
longs, particularly his latest, Your Re- 
quest Sing Along, will be welcome 
at large family gatherings ... or try 
The Slightly Fabulous, Limeliters 
(RCA Victor LSP 2393). 




FOR THE FUNNYBONE 

Shelley Berman puts in A Personal 
Appearance (Verve 15027). And Be- 
hind the Button-Down Mind of 
Bob Newhart (Warner Bros. 1417) 
present a laugh-fest manufactured by 
the world's funniest Certified Public Ac- 
countant . . . The 2000 and One Years 
(Capitol 1618) as limned by Mel Brooks 
with Carl Reiner is ageless humor for 
the young in heart . . . And Jose Jim- 
enez' Astronaut (Kapp 1238) is still 
timely too. 

FOR THAT SPECIAL MOOD 

The George Shearing Quintet has 
cloaked romantic standards in a Satin 
Affair (Capitol 1628) . . . George 
Greeley plays Popular Piano Con- 




certos of Famous Film Themes 

(Warner Bros. 1427) . . . And Roger 
Williams has a feather in his Kapp with 
Songs of the Soaring Sixties (Kapp 
1251) ... A gift of Andre Previn will 
add A Touch of Elegance (Columbia 
1649) . . . And Jackie Gleason provides 
the romantic touch with a Lover's 
Portfolio (Capitol WBO 1619). 

FOR THE JAZZ BUFF 

The traditionalist will probably get 
kicks, unless he's a purist, from Al 
(He's the King) Hirt and his neo- 
Dixie band (RCA Victor LPM 2354) 
. . . while classicists (those who dig the 
so-called Swing Era) will flip over The 
Fletcher Henderson Story (Colum- 



bia C4L 19), which records the life of 
the man who practically invented swing 
. . . Another big package of modern 
jazz is certainly Miles Davis In Per- 
son at the Blackhawk, Friday and 
Saturday Nights (Columbia CL 1669 
and 1670, or C2L 20) . . . Doin' the 
Thing at the Village Gate is the Horace 
Silver Quintet (Blue Note 4076) . . . 
Gerry Mulligan presents A Concert in 
Jazz (Verve 8415) with an extremely 
flexible and sensitive big band. 

FOR NOSTALGIA LOVERS 

I Remember Tommy (Reprise 
1003) is Frank Sinatra's salute to Tom- 
my Dorsey and a must for Sinatra fans 
... Of the many movie theme LP's 
available Hugo Montenegro's three- 
volume Great Songs from Motion 
Pictures (Time 2044, 2045, 2046) is 
the most nostalgic, filled with 48 memor- 
able tunes from film musicals dating 
from 1927 through 1960 ... Or try The 
Greatest Hits from Columbia's vaults 
(Columbia C2X-3), including Buddy 
Clark's "Linda," "Sentimental Journey," 
and 22 others in a two-volume set. 

FOR THE LONG HAIR 

Easily one of the best of the popular 
collections of classical music is Mel- 
odies of the Masters (Capitol SA 
8563, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69), a seven- 
volume set perfect for youngsters or 
adults beginning to broaden their mus- 
ical horizons. Culled from Capitol's cat- 
alogue, it's an impressive array of 
familiar classical melodies . . . The 
opera lover will find complete enjoy- 
ment with Verdi's Otello as exquisite- 
ly packaged in RCA Victor's Soria series 
(LD 6155), including a handsome 60- 
(Continued on 76F) 




76B 



THE LISTENING POST 





Dave Brubeck, jazz money-man. 

• "The Twist" has finally taken the 
nation by storm, with High Society 
kicking up its heels and getting its kicks 
from the infectious beat. As we noted 
here two months ago, popularity of 
"Twist" dance contests for middle-aged 
couples was forcing band leaders to 
add the number to their repertoire, 
sandwiched between "Tea for Two" and 
"Night and Day." The stock of 19-year- 
old Chubby Checker, who's responsi- 
ble for it all, has shot sky-high, with 
unprecedented demand reported by 
dealers for his "Twist" LP's on Park- 
way. A spate of twist records from every 
label are now on the market. The most 
adroit description of the dance was re- 
ported by society chronicler Cleveland 
Amory, quoting a Cafe Society matron : 
"The thing to remember when doing 
the Twist is that you are drying your 
fanny with a towel at the same time 
you're putting out a cigarette with your 
front foot." 



"The 12 Greatest Songs Ever Written'" 
is the imposing and almost presump- 
tuous title of a new LP (Cameo 2003). 
All but one have stood the test of time, 
and certainly all have been outstanding 
popular favorites, but due to the amount 
of music that can be crammed into one 
LP, they've chosen a rather arbitrary 
magic number. The Golden Dozen 
tapped for posterity by Cameo (includ- 
ing music man Don Costa) are: "Begin 
The Beguine," "Autumn Leaves," 
"Never On Sunday," "Summertime," 
"Laura," "You'll Never Walk Alone," 
"Stormy Weather," "Stardust," "Old 
Man River," "Always," "My Melancholy 
Baby," and "September Song." Any 
there you can't hum? 

Conway Twitty, along with Jo- Ann 
Campbell and Kenny Miller, are fin- 
ishing up three weeks of location shoot- 
ing in Toronto, Canada, for the United 
Artists film, "Johnny Melody." Con- 
way's latest LP is "The Conway Twitty 
Touch" (MGM 3943). 

Jimmie Rodgers is not resting on 
his laurels. He won a Motion Picture 
Exhibitor Laurel Award as one of the 
top ten new screen stars for his role in 
"The Little Shepherd of Kingdom 
Come" for 20th Century-Fox. His new 
LP, "The Folk Song World of Jimmie 
Rodgers" (Roulette 25150), includes 
the very moving "A Little Dog Cried," 
which appealed to many when it was 
released as a single. 

Dave Brubeck, an accomplished 
jazzman who is frowned on by many in 
the "pure" jazz world for his commer- 
cial success, will be doing a Liberace 
(laughing all the way to the bank) 
when sales of his "Time Out" LP 
(Columbia 1397) are added up. On 
December 31 the Dave Brubeck Quartet 
will do a TV special, next month con- 
certs in Florida, and on February 21 a 
Town Hall concert in New York. 

An unusual record of probably the 
largest musical instrument in the world 
— covering three acres — has come to our 



attention. It's the unique "Stalacpipe" 
organ located in the caverns at Luray, 
Virginia, a complex electronic system 
which plays stalactites like the pipes of 
an organ. The idea of inventor-musician 
Leland W. Sprinkle, Sr., the organ 
has a mystic, echoing tone that gives 
such melodies as "Beautiful Dreamer" 
and "America" ethereal beauty. The 45 
RPM record, which includes seven selec- 
tions for 98 cents, is available by writ- 
ing to Luray Caverns, Virginia. 

An impressive new series called "Liv- 
ing Literature" has Raymond Massey 
reading the writings and speeches of 
Abraham Lincoln, Ronald Colman 
reading Shakespeare's sonnets, Thomas 
Mitchell reading Plato, Marvin Mil- 
ler reading Mark Twain, and others. 

Rick Nelson, who had a number-one 
record this year in "Travelin' Man," 
now has, appropriately, the number-one 
record in Denmark, Finland, Norway, 
Sweden, Germany and New Zealand — 
but Rickey's international hit is not 
"Travelin' Man." It's the flip side, 
"Hello Mary Lou"! 




Jimmie Rodgers, singer turned actor. 



76C 




ON THE RECORD 






Your Monthly ON RECORD Guide 



POPULAR 

••••If You Go, Peggy Lee (Capi- 
tol 1630) — Miss Lee's voice has be- 
come a wonderful musical instrument, 
capable of expressing the most fragile 
nuances of meaning and mood. Her 
artistry is so great that you soon forget 



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she's there. Only her velvet touch and 
a delicate fragrance remain, enchanting 
you with the murmur of love songs such 
as "Say It Isn't So," "I Wish I Didn't 
Love You So," and "As Time Goes By." 

•••••Ella In Hollywood, Ella 
Fitzgerald (Verve 4052)— The First 
Lady of Song is so perfect that even a 
recorded-live performance (as here, at 
Hollywood's Crescendo) becomes a 
showcase for her jewel-like tours de 
force. 

••••This Little Boy Of Mine, 

Gloria Lynne (Everest 5131) — The 
splendid talent of Gloria is at last gain- 
ing wider recognition. The vitality and 
intensity of her gospel-based style infuse 
such tunes as "Impossible," "The Jazz 
In You," and Ray Charles' "This Little 
Boy of Mine." 

•••Roger Williams' Greatest 
Hits (Kapp 1260) — Leading off with 
the nimble-fingered pianist's first hit, 
"Autumn Leaves" this LP runs 
through a collection of his biggest, 
including "Tammy," "Claire de Lune" 
and nine others. Fans who haven't 
all of his LP's will treasure this one. 



••••Sarah Vaughn's Golden 
Hits (Mercury 60645) — Our Sarah 
has produced some beautiful records 
through the years and many are repre- 
sented in this collection. She can sing 
with the soaring lyric quality of a 
nightingale on the wing, as you well 
know, if you're a Sarah fan. It's a 
pleasure to listen to this LP and recom- 
mend it to others. 

MOOD MUSIC 

•••Soft Vibes, Soaring Strings, 

Lionel Hampton (Columbia 1661) — 
Hamp has been with us through swing, 
hard-driving bop and rhythm-and-blues. 
Here his facile vibes work is set against 
lush violin orchestrations of moody 
standards for good effect. 

•••The Golden Horn, Billy Butter- 
field (Columbia 8473)— Billy's lyric 
trumpet has never sounded better than 
on this lushly orchestrated LP featuring 
tunes that in the past have received 
trumpet solo treatment, including "And 
the Angels Sing." and "Tenderly." 




CLASSICAL 

••••My Favorite Chopin, Van 
Cliburn (RCA Victor LM-2576)— The 
young Texas virtuoso is in brilliant 
form with standards of the Chopin 
repertoire, including the "Heroic" 
Polonaise, Scherzo No. 3 in C-Sharp 
Minor, and others. 




••••Pictures at an Exhibition 

(Mussorgsky-Ravel) Andre Vandernoot 
& the Paris Conservatory Orchestra 
(Command Classics 11003) — One of a 
new series, this recording comes from 
a company which pioneered the sounds 
of stereo percussion. They capture in 
this set the full brilliance of the com- 
poser's popular work as orchestrated 
by Ravel. A fine addition to your col- 
lection, even if you have another ver- 



••••Cello Sonata (Shostakovich) 
& "Arpeggione" Sonata (Schubert), 
Daniel Shafran, cellist (RCA Victor 
LM-2553) — This young Russian cellist 
has a sureness of tone and technique, 
coupled with a poetic insight, that com- 
pares him favorably with Casals. 
Pianist Lydia Pecherskaya accompanies 
him with complete accord in these two 
sonatas, with an especial feeling for the 
work of their countryman. 

••••Kreutzer Sonata (Beethoven) 

6 Concerto For Two Violins in D 
Minor (Bach), Heifetz (RCA Victor 
LM-2577)— Coupled with Mr. Heifetz 
on the Bach Concerto is his young pro- 
tege, Erick Friedman, in his debut per- 
formance. Both works are welcome 
additions to the ever-growing Heifetz 
discography. 

•••••Melodies of the Masters, 

7 Volumes of Various Artists and Selec- 
tions (Capitol 8563, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 
69) — Here is a veritable treasure trove 
of classical and near-classical melodies 



76D 



***** CHEAT! 
*** GOO& LISTENING 



**** EXCELLENT 
** tT*S VOUf? MONEY 



that can serve as either a nucleus 
library to build from, or as a general 
collection of perennial favorites to keep 
near the record player for musical 
emergencies. Each volume is keyed to 
a different theme, in numerical order: 
Music of Romance, Rhythms of Spain, 
Dances of the Old World, Portrait of 
the Waltz, Mysteries of the Night, 
Music of Reflection, Music of the 
Imagination. Artists both great and 
near-great are represented here, per- 
forming the fondly familiar and the 
vaguely familiar, including such ob- 
vious melodies (for such a collection) 
as "Liebestraum," "Ritual Fire Dance," 



• 




Strauss and Chopin waltzes, "Flight of 
the Bumble Bee," and "Sabre Dance." 
Excellent as a gift or for your own 
growing family or even for yourself. 

JAZZ 

•••High Flying, Lambert, Hend- 
ricks & Ross (Columbia 1675) — Most 
successful have been the trio's inspired 
vocalizations of Basie and Ellington 
instrumentals. Though there were mo- 
ments of high humor in this latest LP, 
several of their scat arrangements leave 
one merely bewildered. 



rMartialSolal (Capitol 1026) 
—This LP, subtitled "Europe's Great- 
est Jazz Pianist," may well offer what 
it says. For sheer inventiveness and 
free-wheeling style, Martial Solal has 



an individuality of expression that, for 
a similar reason, immortalized Art 
Tatum. Two sides of Solal are offered, 
exciting solo pyrotechnics of standard 
tunes on one, and swinging, grooving 
ensemble work by his trio on imagina- 
tive originals by Solal. Don't miss hear- 
ing this one! 

***The Best of the Dukes of 
Dixieland (Audio Fidelity 5956) — 
Here's an excellent sampler of 12 of 
the Dukes' most popular two-beat num- 
bers. If you're an unsophisticated Dixie 
fan, this will be an excellent introduc- 
tion to this group that grew out of a 
college collaboration. Tunes include 
such oldies as "Dixie," "Saints Go 
Marching In," "Muskrat Ramble" and 
others almost too familiar. 

••••The Blues in Modern Jazz, 

various jazz groups (Atlantic 1337) — 
Eight interpretations of the blues are 
offered here by an impressive roster of 
jazz stars, including Dizzie Gillespie, 
Art Blakey with Thelonius Monk on the 
classic "Blue Monk," Lennie Tristano, 
Charles Mingus, Milt Jackson, Ray 
Charles, Jimmy Giuffre, and the Mod- 
ern Jazz Quartet with a masterful 
"Bluesology." Gunther Schuller pro- 
vides informative notes, making this a 
definite "collector's item." 

••••The Soul Clinic, Hank Craw 
ford (Atlantic 1372)— The Ray Charles 
band without Charles, is led by altoist 
Crawford through seven tunes, includ- 
ing three of Crawford's own. Here is 




improvising with purpose and style, and 
yet with well-knit unity and warmth. 

•••••Ole Coltrane, John Coltrane 
(Atlantic 1373) — This could well be 
titled "More of My Favorite Things," 
because the same driving intensity, the 
same incredibly exciting improvisations, 
are here. As hypnotic (or "hip"-notic) 
as Ravel's "Bolero," this LP is a great 
event, in which Coltrane's creative gen- 
ius is more evident than ever before. 
A major jazz work! 



(sssMiSss m 




COUNTRY-WESTERN 

•••That Country Sound, J aye P. 
Morgan (MGM 3940)— Twelve out- 
standing country hits are given full and 
understanding treatment by Jaye P., 
including "Slipping Around," "Cold, 
Cold Heart," and the title tune, which 
was a hit for both her and Johnny 
Cash. 

THE BLUES 

•••Jimmy Reed at Carnegie Hall 

(Vee Jay 2-LP 1035)— You can hear 
that blues sound on many of the current 
pop records these days, but Jimmy 
Reed's kind of "down home" styled 
blues is the real thing. Earlier this year, 
Jimmy appeared at Carnegie Hall and 
one of this two-LP set is devoted to that 
session. The other LP is a collection of 
his past hits, redone for this package. 



76E 




ON THE RECORD 



Gift Suggestions 

for Everyone You Know 

(Continued from page 76B) 

page libretto. Major roles are taken by 
Jon Vickers, Leonie Rysanek and Tito 
Gobbi. 

FOR THE TOP-FORTY FAN 

Of the bewildering number to choose 
from, Chubby Checker's Twist LP's 
seem favored (Parkway 7001, 7002, and 
7004) . . . Earl Palmer's Drumsville 
(Liberty 3201), a collection of rocking 
hits of the past . . . Elvis Presley's Blue 
Hawaii (RCA Victor LPM 2426) . . . 
Jimmy Reed at Carnegie Hall (Vee 
Jay 1035). Timi Yuro (Liberty 3208). 

FOR THE YOUNG 

Now that The Chipmunks are cavort- 
ing on the TV screen — which exerts its 
power over the small fry in the realm 
of commercials, as well as ideas — you 
will probably be besieged with demands 
for The Alvin Show (Liberty 7209). 
Stifle their cries with a gift package 
. . . Walt Disney is at it again, this time 
with a movie version of Victor Herbert's 
"Babes in Toyland," which will be 
exceedingly in vogue in the next few 
weeks before Christmas. An original- 
cast LP (Vista 4022) has Tommy Sands, 
Annette, Ray Bolger and Ed Wynn do- 
ing a beautiful job on the revised lyrics. 
A delightful gift for young and old. 

FOR A MERRY CHRISTMAS 

Season's Greeting (Capitol 1622). 
Various stars offering carols, sacred 
songs, folk songs and novelties. 
Feliz Slatkin (Liberty 13013) Feliz' 
fantastic strings offer traditional carols 
and sacred songs. 

Wish You a Merry Christmas, Rob- 
ert Rheims Choraliers (Liberty 6088). 
Holiday Sing Along, Mitch Miller 
(Columbia CS 8501). 
We Wish You the Merriest (Colum- 
bia CS 8499). 

Christmas with Chet Atkins (RCA 
Victor LPM 2423). Includes classical 
and electric guitar readings of both 
carols and Christmas pop songs. 
The Coming of Christ (Decca). A 
beautiful production of the musical 
score from NBC-TV's "Project 20" 
program. 




^-Hottest LPS! West Side Story, five versions. Take your pick 
of these exciting musical treats: Original Broadway Cast (Columbia 
OL 5230), Movie Soundtrack (Columbia OL 5670), Leonard Bern- 
stein Symphonic Dance Suite (Columbia 5651), Stan Kenton Jazz 
Version (Capitol 1609), Ferrante & Teicher (United Artists 3166). 



On the Record's monthly survey of the hottest new LP's 
and singles lists those records showing the strongest sales 
in retail stores, based on reports from manufacturers, 
distributors, trade publications — including Bill Gavin 
Record Reports, Billboard Music Week, Cashbox, and 
Variety. 



BEST SELLING NEW LP'S 

Behind the Button Down Mind of Bob Newhart (Warner Bros. 
1417) — The funniest C.P.A. around, and one of the bright new talents on 
TV now, too. 

Close Up, Kingston Trio (Capitol 1642) — Well-known folk tunes done 

well by a well-known threesome. 

Breakfast at Tiffany's, Henry Mancini (RCA Victor LPM 2362)— 

Holly Golightly and her whole incredible menage set to music. 

Blue Hawaii, Elvis Presley (RCA Victor LPM 2426)— Elvis goes 

native, singing 14 songs from his latest film. 

Never On Sunday, Connie Francis (MGM 3965) — Movie melodies get 

pert treatment from Connie, including the song she sang at the Academy 

Awards. 

Your Request Sing Along with Mitch Miller (Columbia 1671) — 

No end in sight for the success of this series, unless the bearded one 

runs out of familiar old melodies. 

I Remember Tommy, Frank Sinatra (Reprise 1003) — Nostalgia in full 

flower, as The Leader recalls the days when he was known as The Voice. 

A Personal Appearance, Shelley Berman (Verve 15027) — Here's a 

very funny man with very funny material. What more do you want from 

a comedy album? 

The Highwaymen (United Artists 3125) — Watch out, Kingston Trio, 

these boys are liable to ambush you on the road — and they outnumber 

you, too. 

The Slightly Fabulous Limeliters (RCA Victor LPM 2393)— Folk 

singing at its best, with a humorous touch. 

Mexico, Bob Moore (Monument 4005) — A top single with adult appeal 

makes this LP, with 11 more South-of-the-Border sounds, appealing, too. 

Songs of the Soaring 60's, Roger Williams (Kapp 1251)— Roger is 

very much in tune with the times. 

He's The King, Al Hirt and His Band (RCA Victor LPM 2354)— Neo- 

Dixieland served up by a master showman. 

Rydell at the Copa, Bobby Rydell (Cameo 1011)— The teen-age 

favorite in evening clothes for a well-received night-club appearance. 

Stereo 33/mm, Enoch Light (Command RS 826 SD) — Brilliant sounds 

for the stereo fan and music lover alike. 

Jamal's Alhambra, Ahmad Jamal (Argo 685) — An expert pianoman 

relaxing in his own club and making everyone feel at home. 





76F 



Percy Faith: Eternal Summer 



OF THE MONTH 



^Hottest Single! Goodbye Cruel World, James Darren (Col- 
pix) — Jimmy's running away to the circus 'cause he's lost his girl. 
Unusual sound and cute idea. 



THE HOT SINGLES 

Tonight, Ferrante & Teicher (United Artists) — This haunting melody 
from the musical of the season, given full expression by a hit-making 
piano duo. 

Happy Birthday, Sweet Sixteen, Neil Sedaka (RCA Victor) — An 
obvious bid for teen-age popularity that pays off. 

Run To Him, Bobby Vee (Liberty)— A ballad with that bright, up- 
tempo sound, with Bobby singing like crazy. 

Everlovin'/A Wonder Like You, Rick Nelson (Imperial) — Ozzie and 
Harriet must be proud of their boy, who can make a hit of both sides of 
the record. 

Heartaches, The Marcels (Colpix) — These boys have found that the 
best songs are the old songs — like "Blue Moon." 

School Is In, U.S. Bonds (Legrand) — A rather obvious sequel to his 
"School Is Out," but effective. 

God, Country and My Baby, Johnny Burnette (Liberty) — An emotion- 
packed ballad with patriotic overtones, sung by Johnny with good tone. 
Moon River, Jerry Butler (Vee Jay) & Henry Mancini (RCA Victor) — 
Both versions of this song, taken from the score of "Breakfast at Tif- 
fany's," are making it big. 

I Don't Know Why, Linda Scott (Canadian American) — Linda's dis- 
tinctive voice and styling are rapidly building her a fine reputation as a 
vocalist. 

I Want To Thank You/Door to Paradise, Bobby Rydell (Cameo) — 
The first, up-tempo side has the teenagers jumping, but adults are digging 
the ballad side, too. 

You're the Reason, Bobby Edwards (Crest) — This country melody has 
universal appeal, well handled by Bobby. 

HOT SINGLES CONTENDERS 

Crazy, Patsy Cline (Decca). 

My Heart Belongs Only to You/The Way I Am, Jackie Wilson 

(Brunswick). 

Somewhere Along the Way, Steve Lawrence (United Artists). 

September in the Rain, Dinah Washington (Mercury). 

Gypsy Woman, The Impressions (ABC) . 

Nothing in the World, Marie Knight (Okeh) . 

There's No Other Like My Baby, The Crystals (Philles) . 

A Certain Girl/I Cried My Last Tear, Ernie K-Doe (Minit). 

It Will Stand, The Showmen (Minit). 

Dreamin' About You, Annette (Vista). 

Don't Walk Away From Me, Dee Clark (Vee Jay) . 

Seven Day Fool, Etta James (Argo). 

Walk On By, Leroy Van Dyke (Mercury). 

Everybody's Cryin', Jimmie Beaumont (May). 

Little Altar Boy, Vic Dana (Dolton). 

Fever, Pete Bennett (Sunset). 

Joy, Joy, Joy, Little Richard (Mercury). 




The Unforgettable 
TOP 40 TUNES 
Poll Brings Memories 
of the Recent Past 



• When the great melodies of the "Rock 
and Roll Years" are recalled with misty 
eyes at succeeding "Auld Lang Syne" 
New Year's celebrations, which ones 
will come to mind? Los Angeles radio 
station KFWB polled its listeners to 
find out and came up with a list of the 
"Unforgettable Forty" of the years 
1955 to 1960. 

Number one record was "Theme 
From a Summer Place" (1960) by 
Percy Faith. 

In the years ahead, are these the 
songs they'll be referring to when they 
say "They don't write 'em like they 
used to"? Which is your favorite of 
the recent past? Can you remember all 
of them — or were you listening to 
popular music during these years? 

Here's the rest of the Unforgettable 
Forty, in order of their popularity in 
the radio poll: 

"Diana" (1957) Paul Anka; "Don't 
Be Cruel (1957) Elvis Presley; "Tam- 
my" (1957) Debbie Reynolds; "Six- 
teen Tons" (1955) Tennessee Ernie 
Ford; "Love Letters In the Sand" 
(1957) Pat Boone; "Moonglow and 
Theme from Picnic" (1956) Morris 
Stoloff; "Chipmunk Song" (1958) 
David Seville; "Nel Blu Dipinto Di 
Blu" (1958) Domenico Modugno; "El 
Paso" (1960) Marty Robbins; "Canad- 
ian Sunset" (1956) Hugo Winterhalter; 
"Blueberry Hill" (1956) Fats Domino; 
"Heartbreak Hotel" (1956) Elvis Pres- 
ley; "Mack the Knife" (1960) Bobby 
Darin; "Who's Sorry Now" (1958) 
Connie Francis; "Honeycomb" (1957) 
Jimmie Rodgers; "My Prayer" (1956) 
The Platters; "Tom Dooley" (1958) 
(Continued on page 76H) 



76G 




ON THE RECORD 



The Unforgettable 
TOP 40 TUNES 

(Continued from page 76G) 

The Kingston Trio; "Hound Dog" 
(1957) Elvis Presley; "Venus" (1958) 
Frankie Avalon. 

The second 20 on the list are: 
"Autumn Leaves" (1955) Roger Wil- 
liams; "Wake Up Little Suzie" (1957) 
Everly Brothers; "That'll Be the Day" 

(1957) The Crickets; "You Send Me" 

(1958) Sam Cooke; "Silhouettes" 
(1958) The Rays; "Don't Let Go" 

(1958) Roy Hamilton; "Young Love" 
(1957) Sonny James; "March from the 
River Kwai" & "Colonel Bogey" (1957) 
Mitch Miller; "Splish Splash" (1958) 
Bobby Darin; "Battle of New Orleans 

(1959) Johnny Horton; "Rock Around 
the Clock" (1955) Bill Haley; "Yakety 
Yak" (1958) The Coasters; "Poor 
Little Fool" (1958) Ricky Nelson; 
"Singin' the Blues" (1957) Guy Mit- 
chell; "I'm Walkin'" (1957) Fats 
Domino; "Catch a Falling Star" (1958) 
Perry Como; "Donna" (1958) Richie 
Valens; "Chances Are" (1957) Johnny 
Mathis; "Mr. Blue" (1959) Fleet- 
woods; "Stagger Lee" (1959) Lloyd 
Price. 

At the Year's End: 
A Review and Preview 

(Continued from page 76A) 

fans outside her race. She wowed 'em. 

With the sale of single records de- 
clining, manufacturers had various 
ruses to cope with the situation. Most 
labels tried to make their one-shot 
singles artists into best-selling LP stars. 
Few succeeded. Technical and packag- 
ing innovations mushroomed. Warner 
Bros, issued four songs — two old, two 
new — for the price of a single record. 
Cadence and Mercury decided to come 
out with a "little LP," which would 
include six pop tunes for $1.69. And 
RCA Victor caused a mild panic among 
smaller independent labels by announc- 
ing a new pop label, Groove, to sell for 
49 cents. 

Early in the year several companies 
tried to get public acceptance for a 
33% RPM single — with little success. 
Experts figured that first would have to 
come an inexpensive 33% record- 
player. 

The main trouble with the record 
industry seemed to be, simply, too 
many records, which meant you had it 
pretty good, with an almost unlimited 
choice of records to buy. 



THE 



NAT 

KING 

COLE 

STORY 




• For nearly two decades Nat King 
Cole has been one of the most popular 
entertainers in show business. Capitol 
Records, for whom he has recorded for 
the last 18 years — since his first hit, 
"Straighten Up and Fly Right" in 1943 
— has produced an ambitious, three-LP 
package aptly called "The Nat King 
Cole Story" (Capitol WCL 1613). 

It comes as something of a surprise 
in hearing these records to realize that 
Nat Cole's story can be told through 
his records. For they're all here, mak- 
ing you realize that through the years 
the mellifluous voice of Nat King Cole 
has been hovering in the air about you. 
The melodies were a backdrop as you 
overcame shyness at the high-school 
dance, kissed your one-and-only to the 
murmur of the car radio, or in later 
years shared cocktails on a Saturday 
night with your loving spouse. 

These "moments to remember" are 
an inevitable part of the Nat King Cole 
story. That is, your story is inseparable 
from the music he has made a part of 
your life, music like "Sweet Lorraine," 
"It's Only a Paper Moon," "Nature 
Boy," "Mona Lisa," "Walkin' My Baby 
Back Home" and "Unforgettable." 

Thirty-six of Nat's best-remembered 
songs are included in this handsomely- 
produced package. In rehearing them 
all at one sitting, it does seem like "a 
little much" of Nat King Cole. All have 
been re-recorded under optimum studio 







conditions — retaining the style and 
arrangement of the original, to be sure, 
but with an added smoothness, skill 
and uniform perfection that verges on 
blandness. There is no denying, how- 
ever, that Nat Cole is a pro, a 
thoroughly disciplined musician and 
performer whose artistry is not only 
unquestioned, but superb. 

Three noted jazz critics — George T. 
Simon, Ralph J. Gleason and Leonard 
Feather, have contributed laudatory 
articles on Cole the man and the jazz 
artist, and on his discography. As 
Simon remarks, "Times have changed 
since Nat Cole started his career," and 
Nat himself puts it this way: "You 
grow up in this business and sooner or 
later you accept it as a business. You 
just can't remain an enthusiastic young 
kid, always looking for the bright lights 
and nothing else. After a while you 
become a responsible, grown-up man." 

The image projected of him is just 
that, of a devoted family man, a suc- 
cessful business man and a citizen 
concerned about the rights and welfare 
of his people. 

It is precisely for this reason that 
some of the remembered vitality of his 
earlier recordings, especially, is mis- 
sing from this reprise (if Capitol will 
pardon the use of the word). One 
vaguely wishes he might hear again the 
enthusiastic young kid looking for the 
bright lights. 



76H 





MMk 





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Select the Breck Shampoo that is right for you - the correct 
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New packages marked with color help you select the correct Breck Shampoo. 
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COSMETICS ARE SOLD - iy 2 oz. 39^ 4 oz. 60j< 8 oz. $1.00 16 oz. $1.75 



Copyright 1961 by John H. Breck 




SPECIAL 

lisT 



LESSONS 



FEBRUARY • 25c 



low the Lennon Sisters Learned the Facts of Life 



OBERT HORTON: 



Hi The Wagon? Off The Wagon? 



AROL BURNETT 

and 
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CONNIE CTH/FMS- SMRS OF THE HOLLYWOOD FIRE! 




MmMM 



B 

THERE 

Beautif 
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R 



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ARE THREE BRECK SHAMPOOS FOR THREE DIFFERENT HAIR CONDITIONS 

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AVAILABLE AT BEAUTY SHOPS AND WHEREVER COSMETICS ARE SOLD 

Copyrlgrht 1962 by John H. Breck, Inc. 



2Hoz. 39 j! 4oz. 60?! 8oz. $1.00 16 oz. $1.75 



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Ml 



Jill III I^IVIUI 1TIU|/|l«ll/. 







FEBRUARY, 1962 



MIDWEST EDITION 

fa. tt» IMm Ssltn Iwnrt ftt f<* << W< 



VOL. 57, NO. 3 



IN THIS 




ISSUE 




mm sitwus u-«< oi mi #uwiooo wtf! 



STORIES OF THE STARS 

That Marvelous Man Garry Moore by Carol Bar twit 

"Kiss Me Sexy! Kiss Me Sexy!" (Clint Eastwood) . . . .by Mar da Minnette 
Has the Romance Lost Its Flavor? (Doug McClure and Barbara Luna) 
On the Wagon — Off the Wagon? (Robert Horton)..6y Fredda Balling 
Dolores Hawkins' Own Story : "Why I Refuse to Marry Gardiner McKay" 

The Woman Who Really Owns Mr. Frank Sinatra 

Scars of the Hollywood Fire ! by Connie Stevens 

Two for the Road (Dick Van Dyke and Mary Tyler Moore head for a crash) 

Twist with Paul Anka and Chubby Checker 

Here's How Arthur Murray Is Teaching The Twist ! 

"I See You with My Heart . . ." (Ray Charles) by Martin Cohen 

A New Love for Lucy (Lucille Ball and Gary Morton) by Ellen Crane 

A Bonus for Lady Sports Fans (Bud Palmer) by James Taylor 

How We Taught Our Daughters the Facts of Life. . . .by Isabelle Lennon 

The Most Sinister Villain of All (Bruce Gordon) by Morton Cooper 

TV's Durable Darlings by Betty Etter 

There'll Be Some Changes Made by Frances Kish 

A Head for Figures (Joan Freeman ) 

SPECIAL RECORDING SECTION 

On the Record: Special 8-page Magazine Within a Magazine 



SPECIAL MIDWEST STORIES 

Bright and Breezy (Wally Phillips of WGN-TV) 

Gobs of Talent (Dave Allen and Jim Bolen of KMOX-TV) 

C'est Magnifique (Anne Slack on KETV) 

A Marked Man (Mitch Michael of WOKY ) 



18 
20 
22 
24 
26 
28 
32 
34 
36 
38 
40 
42 
44 
46 
48 
52 
56 
70 



95 



59 
60 
62 
64 



FEATURES 



FUN AND SERVICE 

Information Booth 4 

What's New on the East Coast by Peter Abbott 6 

What's New on the West Coast by Eunice Field 14 

Beauty: A Way with Hands (Reggie Dombeck) by Barbara Marco 50 

New Designs for Living (needlecraft and transfer patterns) 68 

New Patterns for You (smart wardrobe suggestions) 74 

Cover Portrait of Carol Burnett and Garry Moore by Globe Photos 



ANN MOSHER, Editor 

TERESA BUXTON, Managing Editor 

Lorraine biear, Associate Editor 



JACK J. PODELL 

Editor-in-Chief 

JACK ZASORIN, Art Director 

FRANCES MALY, Associate Art Director 

EUNICE field, West Coast Representative 



Published monthly by Macfadden Publications, Inc. Executive, Advertising, and Editorial 

Offices at 205 E. 42nd St., New York, N. Y. Editorial Branch Office, 434 N. Rodeo Dr., 

Beverly Hills, Calif. Gerald A. Bartell, Chairman of the Board and President; Frederick A. 

Klein, Executive Vice-President-General Manager; Robert L. Young, Vice-President; S. N. 

Himmelman, Vice-President; Lee Bartell, Secretary. Advertising offices also in Chicago and 

San Francisco. 

Manuscripts: All manuscripts will be carefully considered but publisher cannot be respon- 
sible for loss or damage. It is advisable to keep duplicate copy for your records. Only those manuscripts 
accompanied by stamped, self-addressed return envelopes with sufficient postage will be returned. 
Foreign editions handled through Macfadden Publications International Corp., 205 East 42nd Street, 
N. Y. 17, N. Y. Gerald A. Bartell, Pres.; Douglas Lockhart, Vice-Pres. 

Re-entered as Second Class matter, June 28, 1954, at the Post Office at New York, N. Y., under the act 
of March 3, 1879. Second-class postage paid at New York, N. Y., and other post offices. Authorized as 
Second Class mail by the Post Office Department, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, and for payment of postage 
in cash. © 1962 by Macfadden Publications, Inc. All rights reserved. Copyright under the Universal Copy- 
right Convention and International Copyright Convention. Copyright reserved under the Pan American 
Copyright Convention. Todos derechos reservados segun La Convencion Panamericana de Propiedad 
Literaria y Artistica. Title trademark registered in U. S. Patent Office. Printed in U.S.A. by Art Color 
Printing Co. 

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$7.50. All other countries, $5.50 per year. 

Change of Address: 6 weeks' notice essential. When possible please furnish stencil-impression address 
from a recent issue. Address changes can be made only if you send us your old as well as your new 
address. Write to TV RADIO MIRROR, Macfadden Publications, Inc., 205 East 42nd Street, New York 17, 
New York. 



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An estimated 90% of Studio Girl customers repeat and increase their purchases month after 
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seasonal business — not one that is affected by recessions. In fact, during the poor economic 
conditions of the past. Studio Girl's butineee wot up 165%.' 

I TELL YOU WHO TO CALL ON. WHAT TO SAY' AM . mAN «. cpp COUPON 
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Demonstration Kit and exclusive Holly- 
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illustrated "Career Manual" gives you 
the simple step-by-step instructions, and 
a dozen magic words on each of the over 
200 products in the Studio Girl line. I 
furnish everything, show you exactly what 
to do and how to do it. 

No tedious study or training. Merely 
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you'll be making profits the very first 
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CANADIANS: SEE COUPON 

OVER TWO MILLION CUSTOMERS 
THIS YEAR! 35.000.000 GOOD 

More than two million women bought 
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tells us we have 35,000,000 excellent new 
prospects — women who prefer to pur- 
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to $10 an hour part time — up to $350 a week full time — helping me supply this growing 
demand I 

A Complete Line of 300 Glamorous Cosmetics to Help to Build Your Business 

Never will you have to turn down an order or try to convert a customer to something 
she shouldn't buy because "you don't have it". In addition to the famous line of daily- 
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The quality of Studio Girl cosmetics is attested to by the fact that they won the right tp 
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is backed by a written guarantee of satisfaction to your customer I 

OUR NATIONAL ADVERTISING SELLS FOR YOU 

National TV, radio and magazine advertising have made the name of Studio Girl known 
and respected throughout the world. More than 1.000 Radio and TV stations have carried 
Studio Girl publicity into the homes of countless millions. 



•■Hour or u»i«i .„ ., . .-•■• -•- . _ kj „ mag c s proven oy mt uems"- 
nate door-to-door "ll'ng. Their money-makng mag c v ^ (hcse s ,„ 

dous profits reaped by the t n0U * an ,°! n Ve y a „ u | d ' make all week long, selling 
earn more in a matter of hours than tney cou Bea c|jn|C ? y 

door-to-door. Every Person who a™"" 3 ,",, "production has an opportunity to 
or whom you visit as a result . a Card o e 'J r ° H ° „ c „. s | eadin g furriers or 

a^lU°«^^^ 

o!g big Profit Studio Girl gives you on every order. 

A THREE-WAY OPPORTUNITY FOR ALL 

MAN-WIFE TEAMS ! MEM 



DO YOU QUALIFY AS A MANAGER? 
If you have been a crew manager, area manager or supervisor, or 
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details of your experience. Earn up to $2500 a month ! Win free 
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You Need No Selling Experience, No Formal Education 

You may be in your 20's, or in your 60's or 60's. You may never 
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time. It doesn't matter! If you want to earn from $5 to $10 an 
hour ... up to $250 a week in a glamorous, highly respected busi- 
ness of your own, all you need is ambition and willingness to follow 
a few simple instructions. I furnish everything and reveal to you 
Hollywood's most closely guarded beauty secrets I You simply pass 
this information on to your customers. 

HIRE OTHERS. MULTIPLY EARNINGS 

Studio Girl representatives are en- 
couraged to appoint others to sell with 
and for them. Since you get a commis- 
sion on orders taken by those you 
appoint, you can easily multiply your 
earnings in a very short time. Many 
Studio Girls are enjoying profits on 25 
and 30 others. 

A FRIENDLY, RESPECTED LIFE 
As a Studio Girl Advisor, you'll win new 
friends and take tremendous pride in 
rendering a service every woman needs 
so desperately. You'll become a respected 
and sought-after member of your com- 
munity. Scores of our respresentativea 
are asked every day to demonstrate Stu- 
dio Girl's short cuts to beauty to women's 
clubs, PTA meetings, etc. 

DETAILS, BOOKLET. SAMPLES 



More than 10,000 happy, 
big-money making full 
time Beauty Advisors. 
Thousands more earning 



Soenings available for I Hundreds of men now 
hSsbandwi?e teams to " reaping big. profits as 
make $1750 monthly pro- 



I full-time highly respec- 



up to $5 per hour part j ^ own 



family business 



of I Advisors, Organizers and 
1 Managers. 



If you seriously want to enjoy the luxuries or 
lire, you owe It to yourself to write ror complete 
details on a Studio Girl . career. I'll enclose a 
booklet, revealing typical Studio Girl "success 
stories"; plus a generous assortment of usable 
Studio Girl Cosmetic samples. There's no obliga- 
tion . . . not a penny's cost to you. now or evert 
Mail coupon today. 



HH 



lev 



PRESIDENT 



CANADIANS: ATTENTION! 



FREE! MAIL TODAY! Receive Free Usable STUDIO GIRL SAMPLES! 



STUDIO GIRL, Dept. 1022 
3618 San Fernando Rd.. GUndalt. Calif. 
IN CANADA: 8SO laFleur Ave., Ville La Salle, Montreal. 
Your STUDIO GIRL opportunity sounds wonderful! Is it really all you 
say? Satisfy rny curiosity at one* and rush full information on be- 
coming a STUDIO GIRL Beauty Advisor. Don't forget to send my 
assortment of free usable STUDIO GIRL Cosmetic Samples. 
Name: J"? R 



Address:. 
CHy: 



JZon* State. 



Schussing, curving, 
cavorting... and then 




well, 

111 just pick 

myself up... 



and 

start 

over! 





I LOVE 

BEING 

ACTIVE 



I love being active all winter long, every 
single month, every single day of the 
month. So naturally I use Tampax. 

Tampax® internal sanitary protection is 
just as wonderful in the winter as it is in 
the summer. Never chafes. No bulk under 
heavy clothes or clinging stretch pants. 
Prevents odor. Ends disposal problems. 
And a package of 10 Tampax tucks con- 
veniently into your purse or overnight bag. 

Try the modern way, the nicer way, the 
way of freedom. Try Tampax. Your choice 
of 3 absorbency sizes (Regular, Super, 
Junior) wherever such products are sold. 

TA AA DAY Incorporated 
I r^l V 1 rrV\ Palmer, Mass. 



Information Booth 



■ ^ »"■-'?; 




Audrey's son Jay likes to talk on 
phone almost as much as his mom. 



Some Quickies 

/ would like to know if Pernell Rob- 
erts is married. 

B.B., Larose, Louisiana 
No, he is not. 

Please tell me if John Forsythe and 
Henderson Forsythe are related. 

J.T., Westfield, Massachusetts 
No, they are not. 

How old is Rod Taylor and is he 
married? 

D.W., Toronto, Ontario 
Rod is 31 and a bachelor. 

/ would like to know when and where 
Eddie Hodges was born. 

P.D., St. Genevieve, Quebec 

Eddie was born in Hattiesburg, Mis- 
sissippi, on March 5, 1947. 

Can you please tell me if Hugh 
O' Brian is married and how old he is? 
P.T., Omaha, Nebraska 
Hugh is 36 and not married. 

All About Audrey 

/ would like to know something 
about the actress Audrey Peters. 

W.P., New City, New York 



If it weren't for a knee injury, Aud- 
rey Peters might never have thought of 
becoming a dramatic actress. The 
pretty blonde native of Maplewood, 
New Jersey, began taking dancing 
lessons at the age of four, and, by the 
time she was twenty-one, had already 
appeared in several Broadway musi- 
cals. Audrey would have been content 
with her dancing career, but one day 
she tore some cartilage in her knee 
and the doctors said she might have a 
permanent limp. The thought suddenly 
occurred to Audrey that she wasn't 
equipped to do anything but dance. So, 
she promptly began taking drama les- 
sons and exercises to cure the limp. 
She has since appeared in such TV 
shows as The Verdict Is Yours and U.S. 
Steel Hour and is currently seen as 
Vanessa Sterling on Love Of Life. 

Colling All Fans 

The following fan clubs invite new 
members. If you are interested, write 
to address given — not to TV Radio 
Mirror. 

Chubby Checker Fan Club, Frank 
Pettis, 2361 E. Grand Blvd., Detroit 11, 
Michigan. 

Chuck Connors Fan Club, Candy 
Mues, 709 Exeter Rd., Linden, New 
Jersey. 

Michael Rennie Fan Club, Lyn Riker, 
65 W. Montrose, S. Orange, New Jersey. 

Margarita Sierra Fan Club, Louisa 
Carrillo, Route 3, Ennis, Texas. 

Richard Webb Fan Club, Gwennie 
Winters, 205 First St., Beaver, Penn- 
sylvania. 



We'll answer questions about radio 
and TV in this column, provided 
they are of general interest. Write 
to Information Booth, TV Radio 
Mirror, 205 E. 42nd St., New York 
17, N. Y. Attach this box, specify- 
ing network and program involved. 
Sorry, no personal answers. 



= 



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PRIZES PAID PROMPTLY 

IN 6 YEARS $421,500.00 OFFERED 
IN NATIONAL BOOK CLUB CONTESTS! 

In just 6 years, National Book Club contests have offered $371,500.00 in 
prizes! That's a whale of a lot of money! But this new National Book Club 
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Paste Your Answer-Coupon On Postcard 
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I want full particulars about the National Book Club's $50,000.00 "Treasure 
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the 1st Set of Puzzles. 

(PLEASE PRINT) 



I Name 

I 

| Address. 

City 



_Zone_ 



-State. 



Together on TV — Steve and wife Eydie. 




Whats New on the 

PTFi 





Joining Mitch Miller in a "sing-along" — Leslie Uggams. 



<a<u>M± 




All set for golf tournament show — Bing Crosby with Jim McKay. 
For What's New on the West Coast, See Page 14 



by PETER ABBOTT 

Let's Twist Again: Jack Benny's 
contract up for grabs. The binder to 
CBS expires this season and every 
network wants him in its act. . . . 
Westerly winds whisper that Elvis 
would like to be admitted to Sinat- 
ra's Rat Pack. . . . Dick Van Dyke's 
video wife, Mary Tyler Moore, sepa- 
rated from her husband, CBS sales- 
man Richard Meeker. They have one 
child, Richie, age five. . . . Don't 
Bobby Darin's ex-flames ever fall in 
love again? Connie Francis seems 
farther from a steady than ever, and 
Jo- Ann Campbell hardly dates at all. 
Good news on Jo-Ann, though — 
she's making a movie on the Para- 
mount lot, "Hey, Let's Twist." . . . 
Bus Stop working on an adaptation 
of Hemingway's "My Old Man" for 
early spring showing. . . . Upcoming 
dramatic production, "Three Roads 
to Rome," promises to be one of the 
big TV (Continued on page 12) 




*199 PER HALF ACRE 

I here is a broad ribbon of highway that begins in the heart of Savannah, 
Georgia and winds for 3000 miles to its terminus in exciting Los Angeles. 
This ribbon is mighty Route 80— the most travelled all-weather highway in 
the U.S. Millions of Americans have followed it to the West, coursing through 
the rich hills of Georgia and Alabama, passing through the heart of Missis- 
sippi and Louisiana and entering into the plains of Texas. Gradually the 
scenery begins to change. Texas begins to roll; distant hills become higher. 
Then suddenly one emerges into "The Land of Enchantment." New Mexico's 
wonders erupt in a blaze of color and majesty. The mighty mountains thrust 
themselves, tree-topped, into the unimaginable blue of the sky. Dust and 
smoke have vanished from the air and the lungs drink in great delicious 
draughts in heady delight. If it is wintertime snow may cap the lofty moun- 
tains. If it is spring or summer or fall the unspoiled air touches the skin 
softly and the feeling of well-being is nowhere else equalled. But winter or 
summer, it is almost certain the sun will be shining in New Mexico-the 
sunniest, healthiest state of all 50. Yet great 80 is just beginning to take 
you through the sunshine wonderland of America. In the tropical south- 
western pocket of our country you glide through towns like Las Cruces and 
Deming. A short while westward and you are in Tucson and Phoenix, Arizona, 
and from there the West Coast beckons. But nowhere in this enchanting 
Southwest is there a more beautiful area than the mountain-rimmed, pure- 
aired New Mexico region of Las Cruces and Deming. 

To live anywhere in New Mexico is to live better. The superb climate, 
naturally air-conditioned in the summer and brilliantly sunny in the winter 
—the breathtaking beauty of a lavish Nature— the young vigor of a state that 
is causing an unprecedented business and investment boom— the record 
which shows that one lives longer, that health improvement is almost 
miraculous— these are the reasons that tens of thousands of Americans 
already have come here to live, and hundreds of thousands of others will 
be following in the immediate years ahead. 

Consider then: Here in the center of this miraculous climate and beauty 
are towns which have grown amazingly in the last 10 years. Las Cruces, for 
example: In 1950 it had 12,000 people. By 1960, 37,000 ... a rise of 300% 
in 10 years! (How about your town? Has it grown 3 times its size in 10 years?) 
Like Tucson and Phoenix, this area is a beautiful semi-tropical paradise 
where palm trees and long staple cotton-fields flower the landscape. 
Statistics show the same 85% of possible sunshine, summer and winter; 
these same figures reveal even purer, drier air than in Phoenix or Tucson. 

A few minutes from the flavorful town of Deming (population 8,000) is a 
5,000 acre Ranch, picture-framed by the breathtaking Florida Mountains. So 
real, so beautiful, so typically the romance of the Southwest is this valley 
Ranch that it has been photographed for the covers of many magazines 
including the official publication of the State of New Mexico. What better 
way to describe its Southwestern flavor than to tell you that when the 
producers of the movie THE TALL TEXAN sought an authentic locale for their 
picture, they chose the very land we are now sub-dividing into the DEMING 
RANCHETTES. THE TALL TEXAN was filmed on our ranch, the same place 
where you may have a Ranchette of your very own! 

This is the lovely basin of land where heavy equipment is now at work 
constructing wide roads facing every DEMING RANCHETTE. Every Ranchette 
will have direct access to avenues leading to three major highways sur- 
rounding our property— U.S. Highways 80, 70 and State Highway 11. 



$ 5 DOWN $ 5 PER MONTH 

DEMING RANCHETTES is blessed with water which is called "America's 
finest drinking water, 99.99% pure." (Almost every shop in Deming displays 
this proud claim in its window.) Home building has already begun in 
DEMING RANCHETTES and electric lines and telephone connections await 
you. Schools, hospitals, churches, shops, theaters, golf course, tennis courts 
—these are close by in the charming growing city of Deming. Fertile soil is 
yours for the planting, and wait until you see the stunning landscape of 
cotton fields in bloom. Fruit trees . . . apple, peach, pear and plum ... do 
not grow better anywhere. 

And the price of your Ranchette? Just $199 complete for a half-acre, $5 
down and $5 monthly. That's the complete price— no extras, no interest, no 
taxes! At this moment you may reserve as many half-acre sites as you wish 
but please bear this in mind: DEMING RANCHETTES is not an enormous 
development and land such as this goes fast. At these prices you may want 
your Ranchette to be larger— one, two— even five acres. An immediate 
deposit will guarantee that your half-acres will adjoin each other (this may 
not be so in the near future). And you take no risk in sending your 
deposit Your $5 per half-acre will definitely reserve your land but does not 
obligate you. You have the unqualified right to change your mind 30 days 
after we send you your Purchaser's Agreement, Property Owner's Kit, Maps 
and Photographs— 30 full days to go through the portfolio, check our 
references, talk it over with the family. If, during that time, you should 
indeed change your mind your reservation deposit will be instantly 
refunded. (Deming and Albuquerque Bank references.) 

Ten years ago, in nearby Las Cruces, a comparable fertile half-acre such 
as we offer in DEMING RANCHETTES could have been bought for $199. Today 
it's up to $2000! Experienced realtors predict the same future for Deming- 
in a much shorter time! If this makes sense to you your next act is mailing 
the coupon below. And one more thing: we promise that no salesman will 
annoy you. Thanks, sincerely, for your attention. 



I 



DEMING RANCHETTES DEPT. LH-22 

112 West Pine Street, Deming, New Mexico 

Gentlemen: I wish to reserve the following site in Deming Ranchettes: 
D Vz acre for $199. 1 enclose $5 as a deposit. 
D 1 acre for $395. 1 enclose $10 as a deposit. 

□ 1 Vz acres for $590. 1 enclose $15 as a deposit. 

□ 2Vz acres for $975. 1 enclose $25 as a deposit. 
D 5 acres for $1925. 1 enclose $50 as a deposit. 

Please rush complete details, including my Purchaser's Agreement, 
Property Owner's Kit, Maps, Photographs and all data. It is strictly 
understood that I may change my mind within 30 days for any reason 
and that my deposit will be fully and instantly refunded if I do. 



NAME 



ADDRESS 
CITY 



ZONE. 



STATE. 



ANNOUNCING 

COLUMBIA 




BRAND-NEW 
SELECTION 

Today's best-selling 
album. «rom An.T.c- . . 
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, exclusively fro^m the 
Columbia record club. 



ROGER WILLIAMS 

April Love 

Tammy 

Jalousie 



10. Also: Arrive derci, 
Roma; Oh, My Papa; 
Moonlight Love; etc. 



JOHNNY HORTON'S 
GREATEST HITS 

• "Jf- Battle of 
1 New Orleans 
, Sink the 
Bismarck 
■' : North to Alaska 
Lconv.i.j plus 9 more 



67. Also: Comanche, 
lohnny Reb. The Man- 
sion You Stole, etc 




8. Also: Singin' in 
the Rain, Hello! My 
Baby, (da, etc. 



GRAND CANYON 
SUITE -™ 



PHILADELPHIA ORCK.. ORMANOY 



96. This brilliant 
musical painting is 
an American classic 



SI LOVE PARIS 

, i b • 

J " Michel 
1 Legrand 

■q £. and his 
Orchestra 



L? 



| Gunfigh ter Ballads 

MAWTV HOOBINS 



Big Iron ' 
I Cool Water 

[[Columbia! -9 M<H« ' ;, 



12G. La Vie en Rose, 
The Last Time I Saw 
Paris, plus 13 more 



71. Also: Billy the 
Kid, Running Gun, In 
the Valley, etc. 



JOHNNY MATHiS ■ HEAVENLY 

JOHNNY'S MOOD ■ ■ m .... 





4. Also: I'm in the 
Mood for Love, How 
High the Moon, etc. 



3. Also: Moonlight 
Becomes You, More 
Than You Know, etc. 



Tchaikovsky: 
NUTCRACKER! 

sum 

Prokofiev: 
PETER AND | 
THE WOLF 

Leonard Bernstein E 
H Y. Philharmonic I 



Norman Luboff Choir 

MOMENTS TO REMEMBER 
I'll Never 
Smite Again 

Paper Ooll 

The Breeze and I 

plus 9 more 




100. "Skillfully per- 
formed, beautifully 
recorded"-High Fid. 



36. Taking A Chance 
on Love, South of 
the Border, 10 more 



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7. California, Ava> 
Ion, Moonlight Bay, 
16 favorites in all 



AHMAD JAMAL 




HAPPY MOODS 



82. I'll Never Stop 
Loving You, For All 
We Know, 8 more 




72. Also: Streets of 
Laredo; Ride, Cowboy 
Ride; El Paso; etc. 




99. "A performance 
of manly eloquence" 
-New York Times 




37. Blue Moon, Fools 
Rush In, Don't Worry 
'Bout Me, 9 more 



THE 

PLATTERS 

Remember When? 


Smoke Get: 
In tour Eyes 

Prisoner 

«t Love 

Mr Blue 
Heater) 


4;< r k 



2. Also: Somebody 
Loves Me, Thanks for 
the Memory, etc 



CLAIR deLUNE 

A Debussy 

Piano Recital by 

PHILIPPE EKTREMlWT 




98. "Extraordinarily 
beautiful. ..brilliant, 
silvery"— N.Y. Times 



SERKIN 
MENDELSSOHN 

Piano Concertos ttos. 1 & 2 

I .. 

C 




114. "Serkin forges 
through both with 
farilliance"N.Y.Times 




77. Take Five, Three 
to Get Ready, Every- 
body's Jumpin', etc 



HARMONICATS 



Peg O' My Heart 

Deep Purple 

Tenderly 

—10 More 



6. Also: Malaguena, 
Sabre Oance, Perfi- 
dia. Mam'selfe, etc 




61. All the delight- 
ful music from the 
year's gayest comedy 



FOLK SONGS and 
DRINKING SONGS 
from GERM? 




90. Lighthearted 
singing, lusty and 
utterly delightful 




106. "Superbly play- 
ed, exciting"— Amer. 
Record Guide 




47. One Mint Julep, 
Rib Joint, Mangos, 
Pink Lady, 7 more 



. . . and as a new member you may take 

ANY 6 

of these superb $3.98 to $6.98 long-playing 
12-inch records — in your choice of 



REGULAR 

HIGH-FIDELITY 

or STEREO 



FOR 
ONLY 



RETAIL VALUE 
UP TO $37.88 



if you join the Club now and agree to purchase 
as few as 6 selections from the more than 400 
to be made available during the coming 12 months 



THIS EXTRA GIFT*? 

^FREE 

CLEANING CLOTH 

BfaPSKSSS 

out of grooves. 



GUITAR'S GREATEST 



GUITAR BOOGIE 

REBEL-ROUSES 
RAUNCHY 

CARAVAN 
-8 MORE 





45. Also: The Third 
Man Theme, Rumble, 
Honky-Tonk, etc 



110. "Ormandy has 
wrought a smalt mir- 
acle"-HiFi Review 



58. "Comic genius... 
continually hilari- 
ous"— HiFi Review 



THE BROTHERS FOUR 



THE TWO OF US 




60. "Best new com- 
edian of the decade" 
-Playboy Magazine 



1 15. Superb perform, 
ance of this enchant- 
ing ballet score 



19. "Lighthearted, 
winning informality" 
-HiFi Stereo Review 



17. There Goes My 
Heart, Love Walked 
In, Call Me, 9 more 




31. Clap Yo' Hands, 
But Not for Me, Man 
I love, plus 9 more 



107. "Probably the 
finest dramatic so- 
prano"— Time 



Begin the Beguine 
Where or When 
) 10 More 



101. "The most excit- 
ing reading I've ever 
heard"-High Fidel. 




89. Fandangos, Se- 
villanas, Alegrias. 
Tanguillos, 8 more 



97. Mr. Brailowsky 
is "a poet of the 
piano"-N.Y. Times 



217 Also: Song from 
Moulin Rouge, Ebb 
Tide, etc. 



22. Also: I've Told 
Every Little Star, 
Black Magic, etc. 



78. Bye Bye Black* 
bird, Watkin', All 
of You, etc. 



FEATURED ALBUMS OF THE MONTH BY THESE GREAT RECORDING STARS 





MITCH MILLER 

on COLUMBIA records 

119. Memories Sing Along. My 

Blue Heaven, Sleepy Time Gal, 
The Bowery, Dixie, 19 in all 



THE EVERLY BROTHERS 

on WARNER BROS, records 

73. A Date With the Everly 
Brothers. Cathy's Clown, 
Love Hurts, Lucille, 9 more 



RAY CONNIFF 

on COLUMBIA records 

117. Somebody Loves Me. Golden 
Earrings, Green Leaves of Sum- 
mer, It Had to Be You, 9 more 




ROGER WILLIAMS 

on KAPP records 

11. Yellow Bird. Green- 
sleeves, An Affair to 
Remember, Gigi, 9 more 




DORIS DAY 

on COLUMBIA records 

28. Show Time. The Sound of Mu» 
sic, Surrey With the Fringe on 
Top, I Love Paris, Ohio, 8 more 




JOHNNY MATHIS 

on COLUMBIA records 

116. Faithfully. And This is 
My Beloved, Secret Love, Blue 
Gardenia, Tonight, 12 in all 



GEORGE SZELL 

on EPIC records 

112. Dvorak: Symphony 
No. 5 "The New World" 
The Cleveland Orchestra 



THE PLATTERS 

on MERCURY records 

1. Encore of Golden Hits. My 

Prayer, Twilight Time, Great 

Pretender, Only You, 8 more 



FERRANTE and TEICHER 

on UNITED ARTISTS records 

118. Golden Pianos. Warsaw Con- 
certo, Miserlou, Exodus, Begin 
the Beguine, Bewitched, 7 more 



LEONARD BERNSTEIN 

on COLUMBIA records 

95. Gershwin: Rhapsody in 
Blue; An American in Paris 
New York Philharmonic 






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SONGS OF THE 
NORTH & SOUTH 

1861*1 11865 




91. Also: Londonder- 
ry Air, Blessed Are 
They That Mourn, etc. 



LERNER & LOEWE 

C« TOP (Of 

RICHARD BURTON 

JULIE 

ANDREWS/ 

Broadway 
Cast 



EXODUS 

NEVER ON SUNDAY 

THE APARTMENT 

plu s 13 m ore 



92. The Bonnie Blue 
Flag, Battle Cry of 
Freedom, Dixie, etc. 



S3. "Most lavish and 
beautiful musical, a 
triumph"- Kilgallen 



62. Also: Some Like 
It Hot, Magnificent 
Seven, Smile, etc. 




57. "Champion 
blockbuster movie" 
-The Music Reporter 




93-94. Two-Record Set (Counts as Two 
Selections.) The Mormon Tabernacle 
Choir; Ormandy, The Philadelphia Orch. 



JOHNNY ■ THE FABULOUS 

cash I JOHNNY 

SONGS OF 



DON'T TAKE VOUR GUNS 10 TOWN 

BUN SOFTLY. BLUE RIVER 

PIUS 10 OTHERS 



59. "Hilarious . . ." 
— L. A. Examiner. Not 
available in stereo 



^r w 



41. Dark Eyes, Two 
Guitars, Hora Stac- 
cato, 14 in all 



70. Clementine, My 
Grandfather's Clock, 
Drink to Me, 9 more 



69. Also: One More 
Ride, I Still Miss 
Someone, etc. 



FINLANDIA 

PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA- 
MORMON TABERNACLE CHOIR 

plus - Valae Tnite * 
Sweoith Rhapsody ■ 



102. "Electrifying 
performance . . . over- 
whelming"-HiFi Rev. 



REX HARRISON 
JULIE ANDREWS 
MY FAIR LADY 





FREDERICK FENNELL 

conducts 

VICTOR 
HERBERT , 



RODGERS i 




55. "A hit of gargan- 
tuan proportions!" 
-N.Y. Daily Mirror 



103. "Glowingly 
beautiful, full of 
color"-N.Y. Times 



44. King Kamehame- 
ha. Blue Hawaii, 
AcrosstheSea,9more 



29. Onward Christian 
Soldiers, Rock of 
Ages, 12 in all 



54. The best-selling 
Original Cast record- 
ing of all time 



Unforgettable 

DINAH 

WASHINGTON 



15. When I Fall in 
Love, I Understand, 
Song is Ended, etc. 



79. Smoke Gets in 
Your Eyes, My Fun- 
ny Valentine, 10 more 




PATTI 
PAGE 


I 


Sings 
Country 

and 
Western 


<? Jk 


GOLDEN 
HITS <2 



64. "A complete joy 
...new-minted fresh- 
ness" - High Fidel. 



23. Just Because, I 
Walk the Line, Jea- 
lous Heart, 9 more 




18. Don't Blame Me, 
More Than You Know, 
For You, 12 in all 



24. Also: Rawhide, 
Wanted Man, The 
3:10 to Yuma, etc. 



20. Riders in the 
Sky, I Am a Roving 
Gambler, 10 more 




HITS ,# C 
FROM •«*• 
THE MOVIES 



lealunnj PERCY FAITH'S an{inll 

THEME FROM 
"A SUMMER PLACE" 
DORIS DAY-Pitlow Talk 
dltit 10 matt 




*^THE WORLD'S 
GREATEST THEMES 






ROY HAMILTON 



39. Also: When I Fall 
in Love, Like Some- 
one in Love, etc. 



63. Also: Tony Ben- 
nett — Smile; Vic 
Damone - Gigi; etc. 



65. "Audience was 
beside itself with, 
pleasure" N-V, Times 



25. I'm Always Chas- 
ing Rainbows, Sere- 
nade, 12 in all 



105. "A masterful 
account of this mas- 
sive work"-HiFi Rev. 



13. Also: So Close, 
Hurtin' Inside, So 
Many Ways, etc. 



38. Romance, Theme 
from The Apartment, 
Love Affair, 9 more 



® "Columbia," (g), "Epic," ® Marcas Reg. © Columbia Record Club, Inc., 1962 



■"^ Can 

tHatf Have 
Hm? Her 

27. Never Let Me Go, 
Jungle Fever, Down 
By the Riverside, etc. 

12 



11 



II huts New on the 



(Continued from page 6) 

shows of the year. Slated for ABC- 
TV, it will star Deborah Kerr in 
three different roles. The working 
staff includes TV's best — producer 
Fred Coe, director Arthur Penn and 
writer Tad Mosel. 

Kicks & Co.: When the Steve 
Lawrences guest on The Garry Moore 
Show January 9, the camera will 
focus on Eydie Gorme well above the 
waist. Eydie will be just a half- 
dozen weeks or so away from a 
second child. . . . Loretta Young may 
be back in the fall. She's trying to 
sell a new series in which she plays 
the mother of five. . . . TV shows will 
shrink next season. Sponsors un- 
happy with the full-hour series and 
all new projects are being based on 
the thirty-minute format. In fact, for 
the small sponsors, they will develop 
five- and ten-minute shows. . . . 
Walter Winchell blasts TV as being 
hog-tied by internal "timidity, skep- 
ticism, cynicism, commercialism and 
mediocrity," but he continues to earn 
a fat fee for narrating The Untouch- 
ables. 

Heads Up: A nameless exec at 
one of the networks estimates that 
one out of every three TV celebrities 





And baby makes seven — Hal and Candy March introduce Victoria. 



New TV show plans, for new 
year, has lovely Arlene Francis. 



has been to a head-shrinker or is 
presently on the couch. . . . Hugh 
O'Brian creating much excitement, 
starring in that new Broadway show. 
In the meantime, ex-Queen Soraya 
has been in Los Angeles, keeping a 
whole continent between herself and 
Hugh. . . . How come Pat Boone 
never makes a TV appearance these 
days? With the stars, it's always ex- 
tremes—either over-exposure or un- 
der-exposure. . . . ABC bought, sight 
unseen, Gene Kelly's forthcoming 
TV series, Going My Way, based on 
the successful Bing Crosby movie in 
which Crosby starred as a priest. 
Kelly will play the young priest, but 
the part of the elder priest in the 
movie will be changed to that of a 
Protestant minister in the series. At 
the moment, nothing has been said 
about a representative of the Jewish 
faith being written into the script. . . . 
Dwayne Hickman, Bob Newhart, 
Tony Curtis and Jimmy Durante all 
"die" when they have to get into a 
plane. . . . They don't admit it, but 
Fabian is putting all his eggs into 
the Hollywood basket. Only for the 
press does he pretend to take his 
singing seriously. Matter of fact, even 
the good teen-age singers seem to 
have lost their edge, with the ex- 
ception of Chubby Checker. And 
Checker is doing what even Elvis 
couldn't do — making teen-age dance 
music popular with adults. 

Kiss and Run: Wagon Train 
squeaks over to ABC -TV in the fall 
and will remain in prime evening 
time — same day, same time as it is 
now showing on NBC. . . . Eddie 
Fisher due to spend March in Man- 



hattan. Liz, too? .... Anita Bry- 
ant's deejay husband now working 
full time as her manager and sweat- 
ing to get her a good movie role. 
Personally, Anita can take it or leave 
it. She's always wanted to prove 
herself a singer; but, beyond that, 
she would be just as happy by the 
fireside. . . . Being in love seems to 
make Andy Williams ambitious. He 
is trying to sell himself in a new 
TV variety series — if you recall, his 
summer show a couple of years back 
earned him the best reviews of the 
whole year. . . . Lucille Ball received 
a different kind of "crank letter." Not 
many but some fans complained that 
she should have held out for a re- 
conciliation with Desi. Actually, Desi 
gave her new marriage his blessings. 
Lucy postponed her honeymoon to 
tape "The Good Years," a ninety- 
minute spectacular that CBS has 
slotted for January 12. Lucy will 
dance, sing, take part in comedy 
skits, and it's her first TV appear- 
ance since April Fool's Day, 1960. 
The show will be hosted by Henry 
Fonda and concerns itself with life in 
the U.S.A. from the turn of the 
century to World War II. . . . How 
about that Dick Chamberlain (Dr. 
Kildare) dating the daughter of Ray- 
mond Massey, who plays his boss. 
Dr. Gillespie? 

$$$ & Seed Eaters: Sing Along's 
Gloria Lambert has three dates set 
up for the Granada TV Network. . . . 
Ed Sullivan very excited about his 
plans for a special spring TV salute 
to Louis Armstrong. The two have 
been friends a long, long time. . . . 
Lisa Gaye — who looks just like 



12 




Popular TV star Lisa Gaye adds 
still another role to busy life. 

Debra Paget because she is her sis- 
ter — gets a Wells Fargo assignment 
the week following that of Debra's 
appearance. . . . Bill Cullen working 
on the pilot of a new show. He 
would emcee a half-hour series pre- 
senting star acts from various night 
clubs around the country. Paul Anka 
at the Copa was the subject of the 
pilot. . . . The new series for Craig 
Stevens, ex-Peter Gunn, has proved 
to be a big deal indeed. It will be 
made by Associated Television of 
Britain and $3 million has been ear- 
marked for the project. The show 
will be a one-hour adventure series 
titled Man Of The World and will be 
filmed in the various capitals on the 
globe. . . . Sesame-seed-eater Teal 
Ames, the actress who got all kinds 
of publicity when she departed The 
Edge Of Night, has now fled New 
York because she thinks there is too 
much fallout in the city. . . . Amazing 
Arthur Godfrey hasn't a single gray 
hair in his head. . . . Don't eat onions 
if you hope to get on an audience- 
participation show. One of the top 
quizmasters just about breaks out in 
a rash when exposed to even a mild 
case of onionitis. . . . Tommy Sands 
and Nancy Sinatra blissful in their 
Manhattan apartment, but — with 
Nancy's career rising so fast — it may 
soon be a case of Mr. Tommy Sinat- 
ra. .. . Howard K. Smith's depar- 
ture from CBS, after twenty years of 
service, was due to a hassle over 
news policy. Smith's first new as- 
signment is for National Educational 
Television. . . . Gordon MacRae in- 
gratiating himself with TV fans. He 



will be back to host a third hour 
spec for NBC in April. . . . Sponsors 
on The Jack Paar Show will com- 
mit themselves only up to the end of 
March, when Paar leaves the show. 
It's a case of no Jack, no jack. 

Off Camera : Carol Burnett doesn't 
have a divorce yet, but the separa- 
tion is quite permanent. She is seen 
most often on dates with a New York 
publicist. Right now, Carol is hoping 
to do a TV spec with Julie Andrews. 
The girls work in perfect harmony 
on the stage. . . . Arlene Francis is 
offering herself to the network with 
a package titled Breakaway. It would 
be a homemakers' show with re- 
mote live pick-ups. . . . ABC-TV's 
Wide World Of Sports re-debuts this 
month. January 21, Jim McKay 
hosts the Bing Crosby Golf Tourna- 
ment. . . . Handsome Ron Harper, 
young detective star of 87th Pre- 
cinct, polices the area — off and on 
the show — with Margie Regan. . . . 
NBC has set the special, "The Story 
of a Debutante," for February 9. It 
will star neither Tuesday Weld nor 
Connie Stevens, but real debs, and 
will even include footage of the blue- 
bloods doing the Twist. . . . Darryl 
Hickman, Dwayne's brother, gets his 
own show next year — a comedy 
series titled Hooray For Love. Story 
will center about a houseboat colony 
where married college undergradu- 
ates live. . . . Bob Banner, pro- 
ducer of Candid Camera and The 
Garry Moore Show, says he takes 
the teen-age audience very seriously 
and considers their pleasure in plan- 
ning his shows, because youngsters 



have a great influence on ratings. 
Garry Moore, on the other hand, has 
always refused to book in such teen- 
age stars as Connie Francis or Anka. 
Home Stretch: David Brinkley is 
on as narrator January 24 with a 
news special, "Our Man in Vienna." 
... If you haven't heard — singer Jill 
Corey and Pirate infielder Don Hoak 
made the altar-walk. . . . Upcoming 
on NBC is a TV adaptation of Ar- 
thur Miller's only novel, "Focus." . . . 
Louise O'Brien dating a Teheran 
big-wig. . . . NBC has wrapped up 
Diana Trask with an exclusive five- 
year contract. . . . Judy Garland has 
Sinatra and Jerry Lewis on hand for 
her big CBS show in March. And the 
word is out that she may follow up 
with a reconciliation with Sid Luft. 
. . . Sports-car buffs should be alerted 
for the January 14 edition of CBS- 
TV's Twentieth Century. The title is 
"The Rage to Race" and it's all about 
what makes Sammy speed. . . . When 
baritone Robert Merrill duos on TV 
with Roberta Peters, it's a case of ex- 
husband and ex-wife in harmony al- 
though both are now remarried. . . . 
CBS financing a comedy series for 
Tom Poston. The noted satirist S. J. 
Perelman is working on the master 
plot, and the series will concern it- 
self with life in Bucks County, Penn- 
sylvania. Phyllis Avery plays Pos- 
ton's wife. Phyllis has played TV 
wife to George Gobel, Ray Milland 
(in Meet Mr. McNulty) and to the 
missile expert in the now- extinct 
daytime serial, Clear Horizon. She 
says, "It's getting so that I feel like an 
old maid when I'm not cast as a wife." 




TV-radio veteran Bill Cullen has new TV plans for a brand-new year. 



13 



What's New on the 




CDCO)J^! 





TV doctor Ben Casey (Vince Edwards) 
has new "cure" for patients and guest 
Diane James seems to be enjoying it. 




R Surfboard enthusiast — Dick Chamberlain. 

14 



She's a sweetheart — Lori Martin received title 
and bouquet from Y.M.C.A.S of Southern Calif. 

by EUNICE FIELD 

But No Cover Charge, Please! Both of TV's 
young doctors (Kildare and Ben Casey) began 
their careers as singers. Dick "Kildare" Chamber- 
lain studied for the opera and Vincent "Casey" 
Edwards was a night-club singer. Now that their 
shows are going well, both have been bugging 
their producers to let them work a little warbling 
into some of the segments. Cracked Dick, "You 
could bill it as the new bedside moaner." Pleaded 
Vince, "You could show me holding the patient's 
hand before the operation and crooning her to 
sleep, and the hospital could charge it up to anes- 
thetics." Commented Sam Jaffe, who plays the 
venerable surgeon in Ben Casey, "It's not as wild 
as it sounds. What woman, watching the show, 
wouldn't love to dream of a handsome young doc- 
tor singing to her alone? Operations would stop 
being a bugbear. It would (Continued on page 16) 

For What's New on the East Coast, see Page 6 




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What's New on the 




<&<n>&jgg>'Tr 




i 



J Sitting on top of the world — 

R Troy Donahue and Suzanne 

Pleshette in Italy on location. 

16 



be better than hypnosis," he said. 

Songbird Sounds Off: Glamorous 
Julie London, whose album "What- 
ever Julie Wants" is a best seller, 
was asked what she really wants. 
Her answer was a bit of a surprise. 
"I'd like writers to stop depicting 
musicians as kooks, clowns and dope 
fiends. In almost every show about 
musicians, there's some way-out nut 
who gets up to bleat, 'I'd just die if 
I couldn't blow my horn.' I've known 
many musicians who blew their 
horns, musically or otherwise, but 
none of them would die if they 
couldn't — and they know it — and 
even if they thought they would, 
they're not so dumb as to say it. Not 
that musicians have no problems. 
They're people, and the person with- 
out a problem would be dead. Most 
musicians are family men tied to 
hearth and home. I can only think of 
one musician I know who uses a 
needle — and that's to take insulin 
because he's diabetic." 

The Blind Date Was an Eyeful: 
Burt Metcalfe, the handsome bride- 
groom in Father Of The Bride, has 
good cause to remember September 
10, 1960. That was the night he ut- 
tered the historic words, "I don't care 
for blind dates." A friend had called, 
quite late in the evening, to ask if 
Burt would join him and his fiancee 
for dinner. "I'll have a blind date for 
you if you come," the pal urged. A 
blind date who would accept an in- 
vitation so late in the evening seemed 
to Burt very unpromising. But, for 
some reason, he went. "It was the 
night I met Toby," he recalls, "and 
it was the night I fell in love." Miss 
Toby Richman was less impetuous. 
She made Burt wait six weeks before 
accepting his proposal to wed, and 
insisted on a ten-month engage- 
ment before they wed. "Yes," grins 
Burt, "I'll never forget that night of 
September 10, 1960." Chuckles his 
friend, "Why would you forget it? 
That was the night you ate your 
words about blind dates for dinner." 

Business Is Business Even If It's 
Show: The number of actors going 
into sideline vocations to make moola 
is growing fast. Grant Williams re- 
cently sold some of his land up in 
Big Sur (California) on the advice 
of real-estate buff Connie Stevens 
and bought two houses in Los An- 
geles — one to live in, the other to 
rent. Connie also was the instigator 
of Poncie Ponce's first karate school, 
which has since grown into a chain. 
With uncles to advise her, Connie 
has already followed their path in 
realty, and bought, remodeled and 
sold five houses at a substantial prof- 
it. Polly Bergen's specialty shop in 
her home town of Knoxville, Ten- 




Danny Thomas's companion at 
preview — actress-daughterMarlo. 



nessee, is doing fabulously. In two 
years, she has built it into a chain of 
nationwide franchised stores which 
feature her label, "Polly Bergen 
Fashions of the Four Seasons." Jayne 
Meadows has opened her own 
"Meadows Travel Agency" and, for 
a kick-off gift, her doting hubby 
gave her the account of the Steve 
Allen show, which will be traveling 
to many cities. Raymond Burr, Gigi 
Perreau and her brother, Richard 
Miles, are in the art business. And 
Tab Hunter has an Oriental shop in 
Beverly Hills. Yes — it would seem 
that, as Poncie Ponce says, "Acting 
is just a short cut to becoming a 
businessman." 

Playing the Field: John Wayne, 
who made his bow as a recording 
artist recently with his Liberty Rec- 
ords single "Walk with Him," plans 
to record an album of religious songs 
with son Pat. . . . Out at Warners, 
they're teasing Roger Smith and say- 
ing he should make an appearance 
on Room For One More. Roger's 
mother- and father-in-law are visit- 
ing him from Australia, wife Victoria 
Shaw's expected baby may be twins, 
his teen-aged brother is living with 
him, as is his recently widowed 
mother. There are also two Smith 
children on the premises. Roger takes 
it all in stride — went out and bought 
a station wagon so the whole group 
could go sightseeing on weekends. 
. . . Connie Stevens is still dating El- 
vis Presley but won't talk about it. 
Elvis demands more secrecy on the 
part of his girlfriends than Frank 
Sinatra. . . . Gena (pronounced Jen- 
na) Rowlands, who scored as the 
deaf-mute wife on 87th Precinct, 
completed "The Spiral Road" for 
U-I and goes into a feature titled 
"A Piece of Paradise," to be directed 
by hubby John Cassavetes. "I'm 
looking forward to it," she enthuses. 




"I love working with John. We both 
approach our jobs as strangers and 
work it out from there. We leave our 
work at the 'office,' and I believe that 
is one of the main reasons we have 
such a happy home." . . . Penney 
Parker, bride of Edward Bright, got 
two lovely paintings from her 
art-collector father-in-law, David 
Bright, as a wedding gift. Penney 
and Edward plan a European honey- 
moon, but will wait until the first 
year of Margie is filmed. . . . Kirby 
Grant, who plays Sky King, says: "I 
must be getting old. I can remember 
when the headquarters of the 'beat' 
generation was the woodshed." . . . 
Switch Department: Efrem Zimbal- 
ist Jr. had his TV set taken out of 
his Warner Bros, dressing room. 
"When I discovered I was beginning 
to enjoy television, I figured I'd been 
watching too much of it!" 

The Humor of Rumor: When Su- 
zanne Pleshette and Troy Donahue 
were in Rome for "Lovers Must 
Learn," the gossip columnists had a 
field day with rumors about their 
"romance." The young stars wasted 
no time denying it because they 
knew it would only set off more 
talk. In reality, they had been work- 
ing from sun-up to sun-down and 
had little time to see anything of 
Italy or each other, except when 
they stood before the cameras. On 
their return to America, they de- 
cided to "go along" with the rumors 
and do some dating, though neither 
will admit it's more than a lark. 
Then Troy began looking for a new 
home and, when Suzanne helped him 
find one, the rumors grew hot again. 
Stories began to appear about the 
"probable home" of this couple. In 
this new batch of stories, Troy's ad- 
dress was given and so their attempt 
to have some fun with the romance - 
rumormongers hit an unexpected re- 
sult. Troy left his suitcase on the 
back seat of his car one day while 
he went inside to answer his phone. 
When he returned, the suitcase was 
gone and a perfumed note was 
pinned to the seat. It said, "Thanks 
for the mementos. A fan." 

That's No Joke: Actor-trumpeter 
Ray Anthony recently came back 
from a concert tour into which he 
sandwiched a number of talks on 
"Serious Aspects of Popular Music." 
At the close of his lecture at Texas 
A. & M., he called for questions on 
this "serious" phase of music. The 
first question was: "Mr. Anthony, 
when will the Dodgers get through 
building their new ball park?" Ray's 
still searching for the answer. 

People and Plans : Early this year. 
Nick Adams' brother Andrew, eight- 
een months his senior, winds up his 
residency at the Passavant Hospital 
in Chicago. He'll then head West to 



set up practice in Los Angeles. Nick 
paid for Andy's schooling while he 
studied medicine in Switzerland and 
now plans to build a four-story med- 
ical building for his brother to man- 
age in Westwood. Meanwhile, Nick 
has been getting tips from Andy on 
how to play a young medic, which is 
just what he's doing in his latest 
role in "The Intern." . . . Dan Dur- 
yea received word of a dubious hon- 
or. He was notified by the warden of 
the women's penitentiary in Rio de 
Janeiro, Brazil, that the inmates had 
named the new recreation hall in 
honor of him. It seems his old TV 
series China Smith is very big in 
South America these days — and is 
the favorite show at the prison. . . . 
The "older" folks are still doing the 
Twist, but the younger Hollywood 
set merely look at them tolerantly 
and dance the latest — "the Surf." 
This is a creation based on surf- 
riding which has its participants 
starting by bending their knees prac- 
tically to the floor, as though about 
to take off on a surfboard. "Every- 
body's doing it," says Roberta Shore. 
"Only trouble is, it doesn't have the 
advantage of a Chubby Checker 
record for background. Any tune 
with a beat will do — with a drum 
simulating the sound of ocean 
waves." . . . Latest rumor has Steve 
Allen taking over the emceeing 
chores on Tonight when Jack Paar 
exits in March. . . . MGM plans a 
big two-hour special with the be- 
tween-scenes footage shot for "Mu- 
tiny on the Bounty." . . . Bill ("My 
name Jose Jimenez") Dana will have 
a new paperback out next spring 
titled "What to Say If—" It's de- 
scribed as a book of advice for 
temporarily tongue-tied people. . . . 
John Payne, fully recovered from his 
traffic accident in New York last 
spring, returns to TV in a General 
Electric Theater segment to be aired 
in January. . . . The stork is really 
being kept busy by the Crosby fam- 
ily these days. Now it is Gary, oldest 
of Bing's sons, who will become a 
papa. He and his wife, former Las 
Vegas show girl Barbara Stuart, are 
expecting their firstborn this sum- 
mer. Barbara has a son by a pre- 
vious marriage and Gary recently 
adopted the boy. 

The Name Game: Mixups, due to 
some similarity of monickers, have 
been plaguing the stars again. Pat 
Carroll, once a regular with Sid 
Caesar and now on The Danny 
Thomas Show, wishes people would 
cease and desist getting her and 
Peggy Cass tangled. "Maybe it's be- 
cause we're both blonde, have the 
same initials and have appeared fair- 
ly often on Jack Paar's show, but we 
keep getting mail meant for the 
other. For the past few months. I've 



been bombarded with letters from 
fans who want to know 'the real dirt' 
about my trip to Berlin. It was Peg- 
gy. Further complication resulted 
when Peggy arrived in Hollywood to 
star in The Hathaways at about the 
same time I joined The Danny 
Thomas Show. There's one bright 
feature to all this," sighs Pat. "Peggy 
and I, without realizing it at the 
time, bought homes a few doors from 
each other. That makes it so much 
easier to deliver mail to each other. 
Last week, our poor mailman con- 
fided, 'Miss Carroll, both you and 
Miss Cass are lovely ladies but I 
wish one of you — whichever it is — 
would go back to Berlin.' "... An- 




Burt Metcalfe hated blind 
dates — until Toby camp along. 



other twosome with name problems 
are Rex and Rhodes Reason, real- 
life brothers. Rhodes, now in Bus 
Stop, has been getting loads of sym- 
pathy from fans who are sorry he 
left The Roaring Twenties. Actually, 
it was brother Rex who starred in 
that show. The topper in this name- 
scrambling came when columnists 
reported that Brian Keith's house 
had been robbed while he and his 
fiancee were at the Cocoanut Grove. 
Brian's wife could have given him 
the fish-eye — except that, by coinci- 
dence, she was with him at the Grove 
that night. It turned out to be Brian 
Kelly's home that had been robbed. 
Kelly, that is — not Keith! 



17 




From the rubber-faced junmaker, 



When I was a beginner in show business and first began 
meeting celebrities, someone told me to be extremely care- 
ful what I said when I was introduced — especially to a 
veteran performer, and particularly the leading-lady type. 
Never, never, I was advised, tell a long-time star: "Oh, Miss 
Soandso (or Mr. Doakes), I've enjoyed you in the movies 
ever since I was a little girl." This is perfectly fine, if you 
are still a little girl. However, if you are above the age of 



: 







by CAROL BURNETT 

ten, prepare to duck! All of which leads up to the introduc- 
tion of this article, which is supposed to be my personal, 
no-holds-barred, grind-your-teeth-and-write-baby impres- 
sions of Garry Moore. 

I first heard of Garry Moore when I was a wisp of a lass 
attending grammar school in Hollywood, California. No, 
Garry wasn't in my class. I didn't know where he was. I 
really didn't care where he was. 

All I knew was that I occasionally heard a fellow named 
Garry Moore on a radio program. Jimmy Durante was on 
the same program, and I remember that I used to love the 
way Jimmy played the piano and sang {Continued on page 69) 



a heartwarming tribute 









by MARCIA MINNETTE 

Offhand, what would you guess to be the greatest 
single danger faced regularly by a virile, six- 
foot-two, handsome he-man star of television? 
Not a cantankerous cayuse, not a bone-jolting 
ride in a runaway stagecoach . . . not a tribe of 
Sioux, nor a shoot-out with sheepmen, nor even 
a barroom brawl with the bad guys! A laconic, 
clear-eyed, two-fisted hombre like Clint Eastwood 
(who plays Rowdy in Rawhide, Friday evenings 
on CBS-TV) can manage standard Western- 
sagebrush emergencies with the back of his hand. 
. . . What stops him cold is the female of the 
species. The thrill-hungry teenagers. The ro- 
mance-craving adults. The attention-avid, dream- 
covetous, love-starved aggregate of womankind. 

Perhaps "stops him cold" is not the best pos- 
sible choice of phrase in the situation. There is 
a warmth about Clint's bold blue eyes ... a 
virility about his shock of undisciplined bright 
brown hair ... an easy grace about the way he 
handles his powerful frame . . . which telegraph 
the impression that he is — as the Spanish say — 
"much man." Clint can even sing, as proved by 
the hotcake success of his Gothic recording, "Un- 
known Girl" and "For All We Know." 

Like another fairly famous roustabout named 
Gable, Clint has seen quite a bit of action in his 
young years. After finishing high school in Oak- 
land, California, he (Continued on page 91) 



When confronted with the ardent love call of 
a fan, to stay or run— that's the question. Here's what Clint Eastwood did . . . 



20 








I 



Time and again, 

Barbara Luna and Doug McClure 
postpone their wedding date. 
What are they afraid of? 
What are they hiding? 




22 





won 



? 




Is it "goodbye, young lovers," for Barbara 
Luna and Doug McClure? Not so you'd notice 
it — though their attitude might be summed 
up as: Burned once, play it cool the next time 
around. But when will they quit courtin' and 
get hitched? . . . Says she: "I do love Doug. 
But I've been in love before and know it can 
go wrong. This time, I'm not rushing into 
marriage until I'm absolutely confident that 
there's more than love and attraction between 
us." Says he: "Sure, I love Barbara. But I'm 
a guy who once plunged in where angels fear 
to tread — and I'm no angel. I'm not springing 
into anything until I'm sure we're both sure 
this is no passing fancy." . . . When Doug wed 
lovely Faye Brash in Hawaii, some five years 
ago, he was only 21. Back in California, he 
worked day and night in movies and TV, and 
Faye grew lonely for her island home. Eventu- 
ally, neither their little daughter Tane nor 
marriage counseling could avert divorce. . . . 
Faye took the child to Hawaii. "I had Tane 
with me this summer," Doug beams. "She and 
Barbara get along just great. But we didn't 
want to get married while she was here — too 
confusing for a four-year-old! Another thing 
holding up our plans is time. We want an old- 
fashioned honeymoon, with no interruptions 
while we get our marriage off to a good, under- 
standing start." . . . Doug has been busy with 
Checkmate, on CBS-TV. Barbara just played 
opposite Frank Sinatra in "The Devil at Four 
O'Clock" — and gossip wagged when she drove 
a car Sinatra lent her. "There was no ro- 
mance," she says, "but I shouldn't have been 
surprised about the talk. My friendship with 
Marlon Brando was misinterpreted, too. Doug 
is still — and has been, for the past two years 
— the only one I love." . . . What's been hold- 
ing up the wedding? Do they need a longer 
courtship to make up their minds? Or will 
they wed even before you read these words? 



23 




Time and again, 

Barbara Luna and Doug McClure 
postpone their wedding date. 
What are they afraid of? 
What are they hiding? 



Is it "goodbye, young lovers," for Barbara 
Luna and Doug McClure? Not so you'd notice 
it— though their attitude might be summed 
up as: Burned once, play it cool the next time 
around. But when will they quit courtin' and 
get hitched? . . . Says she: "I do love Doug. 
But I've been in love before and know it can 
go wrong. This time, I'm not rushing into 
marriage until I'm absolutely confident that 
there's more than love and attraction between 
us." Says he: "Sure, I love Barbara. But I'm 
a guy who once plunged in where angels fear 
to tread — and I'm no angel. I'm not springing 
into anything until I'm sure we're both sure 
this is no passing fancy." . . . When Doug wed 
lovely Faye Brash in Hawaii, some five years 
ago, he was only 21. Back in California, he 
worked day and night in movies and TV, and 
Faye grew lonely for her island home. Eventu- 
ally, neither their little daughter Tane nor 
marriage counseling could avert divorce. . . . 
Faye took the child to Hawaii. "I had Tane 
with me this summer," Doug beams. "She and 
Barbara get along just great. But we didn't 
want to get married while she was here — too 
confusing for a four-year-old! Another thing 
holding up our plans is time. We want an old- 
fashioned honeymoon, with no interruptions 
while we get our marriage off to a good, under- 
standing start." . . . Doug has been busy with 
Checkmate, on CBS-TV. Barbara just played 
opposite Frank Sinatra in "The Devil at Four 
O'Clock" — and gossip wagged when she drove 
a car Sinatra lent her. "There was no ro- 
mance," she says, "but I shouldn't have been 
surprised about the talk. My friendship with 
Marlon Brando was misinterpreted, too. Doug 
is still — and has been, for the past two years 
— the only one I love." . . . What's been hold- 
ing up the wedding? Do they need a longer 
courtship to make up their minds? Or will 
they wed even before you read these words? 



23 



ROBERT HORTON 







■HP } > 



Wk 






• 






' ''•■■■' 


'0/ 











by FREDDA BALLING 




About the time you read this, Robert Horton will have 
finished his fifth year and 150th segment of NBC-TV's 
Wagon Train. That done, will he dismount, squint into the 
Western sunset for the last time, and stride off to new 
rangelands — as he has threatened to do, several times 
before? Five years is a long time to have been on the 
Wagon, any wagon. But there have been many sober 
satisfactions for Robert Horton, actor, as he hit the dusty 
trail each Wednesday evening under the sombrero of Flint 
McCullough, frontier scout. 

Let Bob give you the rundown: "Before I was on Wagon 
Train, I was a successful actor. That is, I was known to pro- 
ducers, directors and casting offices. I was making a com- 
fortable living but had not yet made a sharp impression — 
as an outstanding individual — upon audiences. I was one 
of the thousand familiar faces whose names nobody knows, 
outside Hollywood. 

"To develop, an actor must work at acting all the time. 
To make use of himself as a talent, he has to try every- 
thing in the field, and he must do it before an audience. 
It can't be done in a classroom. (Continued on page 90) 



After five years of heading West 
Ibout to hit the trail to Broadway? 










4%%. 






fS'i-i 


- 


; , 




^*jfcw^'-i 


j 


■ 


-"' '■ 






by FREDDA BALLING 



About the time you read this, Robert Horton will have 
finished his fifth year and 150th segment of NBC-TV's 
Wagon Train. That done, will he dismount, squint into the 
Western sunset for the last time, and stride off to new 
rangelands— as he has threatened to do, several times 
before? Five years is a long time to have been on the 
Wagon, any wagon. But there have been many sober 
satisfactions for Robert Horton, actor, as he hit the dusty 
trail each Wednesday evening under the sombrero of Flint 
McCullough, frontier scout. 

Let Bob give you the rundown: "Before I was on Wagon 
Train, I was a successful actor. That is, I was known to pro- 
ducers, directors and casting offices. I was making a com- 
fortable living but had not yet made a sharp impression 
as an outstanding individual -upon audiences. I was one 
of the thousand familiar faces whose names nobody knows, 
outside Hollywood. 

"To develop, an actor must work at acting all the time. 
To make use of himself as a talent, he has to try every- 
thing in the field, and he must do it before an audience. 
It can't be done in a classroom. I Continued on page 90 ) 



After five years of heading West 
is B<* a bout to hit the trail to Broadway? 



Dolores Hawkins Own Story: 



The item in the West Coast column 
was blunt and brutal: "Manhattan 
model Dolores Hawkins put it on 
the line for Gardner McKay: 'Set 
the date, doc, or I'm not flying out 
here no more never ! ' " Clear as 
water, no two ways about it, no 
ands, ifs or buts — America's Num- 
ber One cover-girl-model was fed 
up with being dangled on a string 
by America's Number One TV- 
movie bachelor and had told him: 
Set the wedding date, or else. . . . 
That's what it said in the paper, but 
we at TV Radio Mirror decided to 
get the whole story straight from the 
beautiful lips of the girl directly 
involved, (Continued on page 83) 




I ; 



"Why I 

REFUSE 

to marry Gardner McKay 



99 



27 



PI 






■ 



> .. 



Hip 



mi? mmMRNUMMLMMu 




RUTA LEE? 



JULIET PROWSE? 



MARILYN MONROE? 



28 



Think you know who she is? 



LANA TURNER: 






4*1 




MARILYN MAXWELL? 



AVA GARDNER? 



LAUREN BACALL? 



DOROTHY PROVINE? 



Turn the page and see., ,k 



m\? mmnm m». iff in 




28 



Think you know who she is? 



i 



7J/r/i the page and see...k 



m*** 



- 



nr 







' 



1 



r 



IT 







30 





LbLb 



The woman who owns Frank Sinatra is not 

young. On her last birthday, she was forty- 
two years old, some twenty years older than 
the girls Frank Sinatra usually dates. 

She is neither glamorous nor beautiful. 
Heads do not turn when she enters a room. She 
is not exciting. But she is intelligent and has, 
despite her shyness, a kind of serene and 
pleasant poise. Her friends and neighbors in 
Hollywood always use one word when they 
talk of her. That word is dignity. 

Her name is Nancy Barbato Sinatra. 

Ten years ago, her marriage to Frank ended 
in scandal and divorce. At the time, it seemed 
as if Frank was willing to do literally any- 
thing to be rid of her. 

Yet, today, Frank Sinatra ... a man who 
has carefully carved a reputation for callous- 
ness ... a man who has repudiated women 
who fully expected to marry him ... a man 
who indulges in cruel sarcasm at the expense 
of good friends — and who sums up his philos- 
ophy with the words, "If I don't live to please 
myself, I'll end up living to please someone 
else!" . . . this man has voluntarily surrendered 
the freedom he once worked so hard to obtain. 
He has once more sought out Nancy Sinatra, 
even though she does {Continued on page 81) 




Frank played a proper father-of-lhe-bride. 
Early pix (below) show Frank's devotion for Nancy Sr. and children — before divorce. 




31 









X 




■ 





ilia 



OG 



Jhe woman who owns Frank Sinatra i s not 
young. On her last birthday, she was forty- 
two years old, some twenty years older than 
the girls Frank Sinatra usually dates. 

She is neither glamorous nor beautiful. 
Heads do not turn when she enters a room. She 
is not exciting. But she is intelligent and has, 
despite her shyness, a kind of serene and 
pleasant poise. Her friends and neighbors in 
Hollywood always use one word when they 
talk of her. That word is dignity. 
Her name is Nancy Barbato Sinatra. 
Ten years ago, her marriage to Frank ended 
in scandal and divorce. At the time, it seemed 
as if Frank was willing to do literally any- 
thing to be rid of her. 

Yet, today, Frank Sinatra ... a man who 
has carefully carved a reputation for callous- 
ness ... a man who has repudiated women 
who fully expected to marry him ... a man 
who indulges in cruel sarcasm at the expense 
of good friends — and who sums up his philos- 
ophy with the words, "If I don't live to please 
myself, I'll end up living to please someone 
else!" . . . this man has voluntarily surrendered 
the freedom he once worked so hard to obtain. 
He has once more sought out Nancy Sinatra, 
even though she does (Continued on page 81) 




When Tommy Sands (r.J wed Nancy Jr. 




m 



Frank played a proper jather-oj-lhe-bride. 
Early pi x ( below I show Frank's devotion for Nancy Sr. and children— before divorce. 



30 




<r 



f 








§» 




First a Ih in fjnri} line of smoke... 
Then a sickening cloud of black... 
The flames came next, and with them 
a nightmare by day! 



By CONNIE STEVENS 




d 5 „ helplessly 

N eveI have 1 been so «=m e • ^.^ i «„ 

d er « 1-°' ■»» ° ! ^.Ulever erase the m g h,. 
„ea> .brou g h the «£ ~- , (lom our ■£ 

roari8 h memonea of las. ^ „ , al her, od^rl"^^-------^^,**. 

Connie S.even»c»..u.» "- J [ *^i 



C. „le» he eahea «- .he heo- 
room door- 



Two for the Road or 





2. Simple, isn't it? Any husband 
can teach his wife to drive. Sure! 




6, Child's play, yet . . . "I'll cut out 
some angels. Heaven's near enough!" 



1. At start, tney're in neutral. Soon war will erupt. 
They? Dick Van Dyke and Mary Tyler Moore of CBS-TV. 



Then There 



34 



- 



vvrfHa 







3. The braking point, usually reached 
at first intersection. "Don't hit that 
man, the one with the badge on!" 



4. Dual control? He's lost 





5. "Spoilsport. What's scaring you?' 




Watch out for that flashing red light!' 



as This 




1 ' 






i 



t 



with Paul Anka 



and Chubby Checker 




36 



r 







• 









/ To Learn The 



Holiest Dance of the Year, 



\ turn the page 






Heres How Arthur Murray Is Teaching It 





Basic Twist: Feet 12" apart, 
knees slightly bent . . . twist 
hips! On count 1 — twist left 
hip forward, right hip back; 
2 — reverse. . . . Side-to-Side : 
Feet apart, weight on left — 
twist 4 counts; shift weight 
on right — twist for 4 counts. 



Practice side-to-side for 10 
minutes. . . . Forward-and- 
Back (above) : With weight 
on right foot — place left in 
front of right, "twist" for 8 
counts; do same step with 
weight on left. When man goes 
forward, girl goes backward. 



Chubby Checker— "Mr. Twist" 
himself — shows Paul Anka, 
Nancy North, how it goes. 



"Arms and hips always go in 
opposite directions," Chubby 
points out. "Knees relaxed!" 



Back-to-Back (also known as 
"The Backscratcher" ) : Start 
by doing side-to-side twist. 
After fourth count, man turns 
to the left — girl to right — 
50 that the couple dance back 
to back for total of 16 counts 
doing the side-to-side twist. 




Arms to right, hips to left — 
"Imagine you've just taken a 
shower and are toweling off." 



38 




The Chase (similar to that in 
Cha Cha) : Girl makes a half- 
turn on left foot to get into 
position. Twist as pictured, 
shifting weight forward and 
back, changing every 4 counts. 
To get back to regular posi- 
tion, girl makes y% left-turn. 



The Whip: An exhilarating 
arm movement you can add 
to the forward-and-back twist. 
Each partner swings an arm 
in the air — as though whip- 
ping a lariat into play — once 
every 8 counts. (Invent some 
"imitations" of you own!) 



Tick-Tock: Arm movement 
for the forward-and-back twist 
. . . outstretched arms swing- 
ing to cross in front, as shown. 
On count 1 — hands outstretch- 
ed; 2 — position illustrated; 
3 — spread hands about 24" 
apart; 4 — same as count 2. 




Which foot first? No matter, 
says Chubby — long as they're 
apart, one in front of other. 



Partners never touch but will 
imitate anything — from "Bowl- 
ing" to "Choo-Choo Train." 



They're really rockm now. 
at the Peppermint Lounge . . . 
Twist h.q. at Times Square! 



39 



I See You With 




For Ray Charles, living his life in pain and blindness, there was only one way 
out: Song— and his terrible addiction. This is the story of how it all happened 



by MARTIN COHEN 

The scene at the Indianapolis police station on 
November 14, 1961, was grim. Across the table 
from Detective Sgt. William Owen, with Detec- 
tive Sgt. Robert Keithley standing by, sat a 
handsome young man wearing dark glasses. Be- 
hind the glasses were the sealed eyelids of the 
blind . . . but the blind can cry — and Ray 
Charles, one of the country's top jazz and pop 
singers, was sobbing uncontrollably. "I don't 
know what to do about my wife and kids. I've 
got a month's work to do and I've got to do 
it." Sgt. Owen further quotes Charles as saying, 
"I really need help. Nobody can lick this thing 
by themselves." . . . (Continued on page 85) 

In France, public and 
followed the singer will 
devotion close to idol<\ 




My Heart, 



99 








m.. 




sir 



■ 




7 See You With My Heart. Jj 




For Ray Charles, living his life in pain and blindness, there was only one way 
out: Song-and his terrible addiction. This is the story of how it all happened 

WBM m 

by MARTIN COHEN 

The scene at the Indianapolis police station on 
November 14, 1961, was grim. Across the table 
from Detective Sgt. William Owen, with Detec- 
tive Sgt. Robert Keithley standing by, sat a 
handsome young man wearing dark glasses. Be- 
hind the glasses were the' sealed eyelids of the 
blind ... but the blind can cry— and Ray 
Charles, one of the country's top jazz and pop 
singers, was sobbing uncontrollably. "I don't 
know what to do about my wife and kids. I've 
got a month's work to do and I've got to do 
it." Sgt. Owen further quotes Charles as saying. 
"I really need help. Nobody can lick this thing 
by themselves." . . . (Continued on page 85) 

In France, public and pre 
followed the singer ulitk 
devotion close to id° lal ' 






. 






f 



M 



- I 




& 






a New Love for Lucj 



"/ take thee, Gary ..." and 
then it was all sentimental 
tears and glowing happiness 
for our favorite redhead 

hy ELLEN ritWi: 

The wide blue eyes were serious — and 
there was more than a hint of tears — 
as she stood before the minister to say 
the words which were to spell the start 
of a new life. Her startling orange-gold 
hair was subdued under her blue-green 
tulle headdress. Her voice was warm 
and firm as she repeated, after the min- 
ister, "I, Lucille, take thee, Gary, to be 
my wedded {Continued on page 65) 





Mr. and Mrs. Morton (nee 
Lucille Ball) had special 
wedding cake — and ready- 
made family: Lucie, 10, 
and Desi Arnaz, 8, flew 
East to join them (left), 
rode up front in the brid- 
al car as it drove away. 



43 




a New Love for Lucy 



"/ take thee, Gary . . ." and 
then it was all sentimental 
tears and glowing happiness 
for our favorite redhead 

by EIXEN CRANE 

The wide blue eyes were serious — and 
there was more than a hint of tears — 
as she stood before the minister to say 
the words which were to spell the start 
of a new life. Her startling orange-gold 
hair was subdued under her blue-green 
tulle headdress. Her voice was warm 
and firm as she repeated, after the min- 
ister, "I, Lucille, take thee, Gary, to be 
my wedded {Continued on page 65) 





Mr. and Mrs. Morton (nee 
Lucille Ball) had special 
wedding cake— and ready- 
made family: Lucie. 10, 
and Deri Artuu, ll. flew 
East to join tli<'"i (left), 
rode up front in the l>" i! - 
al cor a* it drove away. 



43 



i m 



J 




BUI) PALMER: 

When he left the 

New York Knickerbockers 

for the TV mike, 

Hollywood missed a bet. 

But pro basketball gained 

a lot of sex appeal! 



By JAMES TAYLOR 

# "This may surprise you." says sports an- 
nouncer Bud Palmer, "but one thing I've learned is 
that most women who dial their TV set to a sports event are 
more interested in watching one particular person — one of the 
athletes — than they are in the result of the contest. That's why close- 
up shots are important. If the female viewers think a certain basketball 
or baseball player is cute, they don't want to be told by the announcer that 
their favorite is good-looking — they want to see for themselves." Judging 
from the mail received at NBC, there's still another big reason why millions 
of women have become interested in sports telecasts. They want to see another 
particular person : Bud Palmer. At six-feet-four and a slim 185 pounds, Palmer 
is unquestionably one of television's most handsome personalities. He has 
the physical appearance of a Hollywood leading man — which he might well 
have become, had it not been for the deep interest in athletics that led 
him to a professional basketball career before (Continued on page 94) 



L 



V 



0*1**" \ 




I 




# 







m 






/ 11 


< 

BUD PALMER: 




fl 




When he left the 




» ' 


lJWm 


New York Knickerbockers 






V 


for the TV mike, 




< 


1 


Hollywood missed a bet. 




'■'CJ 


J 


But pro basketball gained 




v 


y 


a lot of sex appeal! 




By JAMES TAYLOR 


^^. 













• "This may surprise you." says sports an- 
nouncer Bud Palmer, "hut one thing I've learned is 
that most women who dial their TV set to a sports event are 
more interested in watching one particular person — one of the 
athletes — than they are in the result of the contest. That's why close- 
up shots are important. If the female viewers think a certain basketball 
or baseball player is cute, they don't want to be told by the announcer that 
their favorite is good-looking— they want to see for themselves." Judging 
from the mail received at NBC, there's still another big reason why millions 
of women have become interested in sports telecasts. They want to see another 
particular person: Bud Palmer. At six-feet-four and a slim 185 pounds. Palmer 
is unquestionably one of television's most handsome personalities. He has 
the physical appearance of a Hollywood leading man-which he might well 
have become, had it not been for the deep interest in athletics that led 
him to a professional basketball career before {Continued on page 94) 







ACJOlWi cLlMMM^ 






^^. 








y 




Several years ago, a friend of mine told me a de- 
lightful story about a seven-year-old boy who 
rushed breathlessly home from play and asked his 
mother, "Where did I come from?" With a sigh, but 
bravely facing up to a bright child's legitimate curi- 
osity, she explained how he had come into the world. 
The boy lost interest swiftly, but the earnest mother 
persisted with her report to the last, then asked, 
"Now do you understand where you came from?" 
The boy shrugged. "I guess so," he said, "but the 
new boy who just moved in across the street says he 
came from Philadelphia!" 

That illustrates one of the first principles by which 
Bill and I had been guided (Continued on page 76) 







. 




in\ 







« 



: 






Li 



^j?yvu^vt 



f\ 





J*J« 



Several years ago, a friend of mine told me a de- 
lightful story aliout a seven-yea r-old boy who 
rushed breathlessly home from play and asked his 
mother, "Where did I come from?" With a sigh, but 
bravely facing up to a bright child's legitimate curi- 
osity, she explained how he had come into the world. 
The boy lost interest swiftly, but the earnest mother 
persisted with her report to the last, then asked, 
"Now do you understand where you came from?" 
The boy shrugged. "I guess so," he said, "but the 
new boy who just moved in across the street says he 
came from Philadelphia!" 

That illustrates one of the first principles by which 
Bill and I had been guided {Continued on pa%t 76J 





/ 



* 





Ice water in his veins! 
Venom in his voice! A 
single nod can mean death 
to an enemy ! That's Frank 
Nitti of The Untouchables. 
. . . Now, how about Bruce 
Gordon — who plays him? 



>l\\\a» 



by MORTON COOPER 

In the beginning, there were Lon 
Chaney and Erich Von Stroheim, 
two of the most malevolent vil- 
lains ever to skulk across a movie 
screen. . . . Chaney as the fiend 
who, because of some startling 
physical deformity, took venge- 
ance on society by murdering his 
nicest neighbors. . . . Von Stro- 
heim as the hard, cold Prussian - 
officer type whose most inspired 
idea of punishing passersby was 
to torture them elegantly and sa- 
distically. Then came Sydney 
Greenstreet and Peter Lorre, War- 
ner Bros.' | Continued on page 87 ) 









w 



fl* 






\ 





Ice water in his veins! 
Venom in his voice! A 
single nod can mean death 
to an enemy ! That's Frank 
Nitti of The Untouchables. 
. . . Now, how about Bruce 
Gordon — who plays him? 




#* 



o\KVV 




Iiy MORTON COOPEK 

In the beginning, there were Lon 
Chaney and Erich Von Stroheim, 
two of the most malevolent vil- 
lains ever to skulk across a movie 
screen. . . . Chaney as the fiend 
who, because of some startling 
physical deformity, took venge- 
ance on society by murdering his 
nicest neighbors. . . . Von Stro- 
heim as the hard, cold Prussian- 
officer type whose most inspired 
idea of punishing passersby was 
to torture them elegantly and sa- 
distically. Then came Sydney 
Greenstreet and Peter Lorre, War- 
ner Bros.' ^Continued on page 871 



\ 



f 

i 





away 
with 
ands 



Reggie Dombeck, pretty 
hostess of ABC-TV's 
Number Please, shows 
you "how" — and "how not' 



by BARBARA MARCO 



"A girl's hands can be one of her 
loveliest assets," says blonde, blue- 
eyed Reggie Dombeck. "There's noth- 
ing more irritating to a man than 
a woman who constantly twists her 
curls or fiddles with her jewelry. 
Take a thumb-twiddler, for instance." 
Reggie twiddled her thumbs, but 
managed to look graceful doing that, 
too! "Thumb-twiddlers reveal their 
uneasiness among people," she ex- 
plained, twiddling better — or should 
we say worse? Then there's the nail- 
biter. A woman is so unattractive 
when she chews oh her fingers. And 
she ends up with ugly stubby nails." 
. . . She went on to demonstrate 
other gestures that lack poise — as 
shown here. Reggie, who has been 
analyzing handwriting since her 
girlhood in Chicago, believes that 
you can tell a lot about a person by 
their hands. "One of the first things 
I notice when I meet a woman," she 
says, "is whether or not her hands 
are well-groomed. Then, of course, 
it's important how she shakes hands." 
A firm handshake, in Reggie's opin- 
ion, is the key to a strong, vital per- 
sonality. Limp, clammy hands are a 
dead-head's giveaway. Reggie her- 
self is brimming with enthusiasm for 
her busy life of television shows and 
rehearsals, a modeling career and 
classes at the Museum of Modern 
Art . . . and, as we said goodbye, 
we noticed that Reggie Dombeck has 
a very firm handshake! 




Scratching an imaginary 
itch and tugging at the 
hair are symptoms of what 
Reggie calls "a lack of 
vitamin C-f 'or -Control." 



Children who fidget can look cute . . . 
but the woman who nervously gestures 
with the silverware or wrestles with 
her jewelry can only appear uneasy. 



The gal who twiddles her thumbs and 
chews on her nails reveals her lack 
of self-assurance for all to see! 





The "fingertip snob" has 
her pinkie instead of her 
nose up in the air . . . but 
both types of affectation 
are equally unattractive. 



51 




DURABLE 



■ 



BETTY 
ETTER 



sH 



«; ; 




The TV price has always 
been right — for Cullen. 



N 



Sullivan bets on aces — 
here's Hope in person! 



In this season of the "kill," 
when new shows get bombed 
out, let's take a look at 
those delightful entertainers 
who go on . . . and on . . . 



-•* 


IHm 


^K V K ■ : A Mr. m9 Bb i 



For John Daly, the richest kind of "jam." 



DARLINGS 







O'BRIEN 




The marshal "a bum?" Not to Arness fans! 







i HI 1 




J^^^t- ^ l \ 


• *jQ • ; 


Ea ^* 




r ' - " " - 


^t,o 


^■11 •"' *£* ■£■■ 


^^^^^^H^B^^k___ "™.=~~ — - r— 1 


Allen Funt with small but very candid friend. 


— 1 




v 1 


A ^^ 1 - 


^ - 


Untouchable — and restless: Bob Stack. 


rontinued ^ 


r 


1 




DURABLE DARLINGS 



by 

BETTY 

ETTER 



3^B 


ilii i; 

■VIA i 1 

rlH W 1 

i ^f | 1 1' • 


1 

2 j- dfl 


A ' 1 1 i 



The TV price has always 
been right — for Cullen. 



Sullivan bets on aces — 
here's Hope in person! 



i w 



In this season of the "kill," 
when new shows get bombed 
out, let's take a look at 
those delightful entertainers 
who go on . . . and on . . . 





rt« 


I 
I 

1 


-;■ 1 

II 













,-« 







O'BRIEN 







WLWLY 



For John Daly, the richest kind of "jo" 1 - 



A. 



The marshal "a bum?" Not to Arness fc 





Allen Funt with small but very candid friend. 



f -^ 



Untouchable — and restless: Bob Stack. 



ranlinufd 



LtaWaial 



DURABLE 
DARLINGS 






'C"""v. 



Shod or no, Dick Boone knows where he's travelin'. 



innumerable stars make their bows on 
the TV screen each season — many to 
disappear after a few months in the 
national spotlight. But there are others 
who survive, year after year, perennial 
favorites in a business notable for its 
change. Among the twenty most popu- 
lar shows of the 1961-62 season are 
a dozen of TV's most durable darlings. 

What keeps them on top? Well, here 
are some of the "inside" reasons. . . . 

When Garry Moore is planning his 
regular feature, "That Wonderful Year." 
he ought to give a thought to 1950. 
That's the year Garry made his first 



Welle and first music- 
maker — his accordion. 



MacMurray — with "three sons" and veteran Bill Frawley. 




<•) 






^ 



Somebody watching Como? Well, isn't everybody? 



Garry Moore can pluck 
talent out of the blue. 



fumbling start on television, with a five- 
times-a-week daytime show which was 
still going great guns eight years later, 
when he howed out in favor of his week- 
ly nighttime variety show over CBS-TV. 

As a guest, he might consider John 
Daly, who — that same year -was set- 
ting up shop as moderator of a new 
panel show called What's My Line? 

Or he could go hack two years earlier, 
to 1948. when a Broadway columnist 
named Ed Sullivan was making his first 
TV appearance as a master of cere- 
monies — with a couple of unknown 
comics called Martin and Lewis as his 
guests. That year might be worth a 
"special." for it was then that Perry 
Como- who ( Continued on page 72 ) 



V*' 





%t£i 



Hillbilly — and Yankee, too: Walter Brennan. 



"Contract trouble" took out 

Rod Hendrickson — seen with Ann 

Flood — just a few months 

before From These Roots folded. 




Beckoned by movies, Lynn 
Loring was judged too young 
for Hollywood role, may 
return to Search For Tomorrow 




56 



Haila Stoddard — off TV and 

The Secret Storm — because of 

Broadway work as producer. 








A roundup of the switcheroos going on 

in the great, wonderful world of daytime drama 



Nancy Malone switched from The 
Brighter Day to The Guiding Light. 




There Ilk some etumniie 



by FBAX 

Last September, a rumor began going the rounds. It 
started in the South, where or how no one knows. It 
was said that in the daytime serial, As The World Turns, 
Jeff Baker (played by Mark Rydell) and his wife Penny 
(Rosemary Prinz) were not going to reconcile. Not 
then, or ever — because Jeff was going to be responsible 
for Penny's death. How and when, no one knew, but 
there it was, passed along from friend to friend, from 
house to house. Whispered in beauty parlors, discussed 
in tearooms and at snack counters. TV Radio MiRROR 
received anguished letters. There was a long-distance 



CES K1SII 

call from a woman too worried to wait for the mails. 
"We can't believe it," was the gist of what was said. 
"Say it isn't so." 

It isn't. It never was. No one was more surprised to 
hear the rumor than the people responsible for the 
show. But the commotion this rumor caused for a while, 
in some areas, was very real. 

This is only one example of the avid interest TV 
viewers take in these stories they watch day by day. 
Even more, in the individual characters and the actors 
who play them. This is also why any major cast change 



Penny Baker (Rosemary Prinz) didn't die in As The World Turns — though rumor whispered she would! 

1 




R 




! 




1 

i 

i 


1 


p 


*^B • 




1 



"Contract trouble" look out 

Rod Hendrickson — seen with Ann 

Flood — just a few months 

before From These Roots folded. 




Beckoned by movies, Lynn 
Loring was judged too young 
for Hollywood role, may 
return to Search For Tomorrow 




Haila Stoddard —off TV and 

The Secret Storm — because of 

Broadway work as producer. 




A roundup of the switcheroos going on 

in the great, wonderful world of daytime drama 



Nancy Malone switched from The 
Brighter Day to The Guiding Light. 



fhere'll le some climes made 



Last September, a rumor began going the rounds. It 
started in the South, where or how no one knows. It 
was said that in the daytime serial, As The World Turns 
Jeff Baker (played by Mark Rydell.l and his wife Penny 
(Rosemary Prinz) were not going to reconcile. Not 
then, or ever— because Jeff was going to be responsible 
for Penny's death. How and when, no one knew, but 
there it was, passed along from friend to friend, from 
house to house. Whispered in beauty parlors, discussed 
in tearooms and at snack counters. TV Radio Mirror 
received anguished letters. There was a long-distance 



I»> FBAXCES KISII 



. s WeCant , beheVei, ''-s the gis, f wh a, was said 
Say it isn't so." 

It isn't, h never was. No one wa, more surprised to 
hear the rumor than the people responsible for the 
show. But the commotion this rumor caused for a while, 
in some areas, was very real. 

This is only one example of the avid interest TV 
viewers take in these stories they watch day by day 
Even more, in the individual characters and the actors 
who play them. This is also why any major cast change 



Pe " ny ^^ <R ° Semary P,i " Z) dU " 1 dle '" * ^ World Turns-tHough rumor whit 



pered she would! 





Thmllk some cknmmile 



brings instant and irate mail, telegrams 
and telephone calls. "If viewers only 
knew how much we dislike losing an 
actor who has been playing a key role," 
sighs one harassed producer, "they 
wouldn't get so angry at us! 

"Good actors — and the daytime se- 
rials have some very good ones — get 
good offers. Many prefer to stay where 
they are. They like the parts they play. 
They like the security of their jobs and 









John Larkin departed The Edge 
Of Night for chance at Hollywood. 



the stability of a more normal home and 
social life than actors generally have. 
Some have already had fine careers on 
Broadway and can't resist a play they 
like. Some are still waiting for that big 
Broadway chance. The movies lure oth- 
ers, daytime serials still being one of 
the best showcases talent can have. It 
just happens that, in recent times, more 
key characters have been changed, for 
one reason or another, in more daytime 
dramas." 

So, if there has not been turmoil in 
the serials, there has certainly been 
turnover. The plot lines of the shows 
are growing more realistic. Even prin- 
cipal characters are allowed to die in 
them now — a drastic innovation. Tim 
Cole of As The World Turns died of an 
incurable disease, as did an important 
female character in Love Of Life. But 
killing off the popular heroine of a top 
serial still remains the outstanding inno- 
vation of the 1961 season, or any other 
thus far. On {Continued on page 92) 



"Death by tragic accident" on Edge Of Night- 
cleared the way for Teal Ames to follow a new dream. 



58 




SPECIAL MIDWEST STORIES 



Below and lower left, newlyweds 
Wally and Barbara (married in 
September) live in an apartment, 
are "house-hunting in suburbia.'' 




BRIGHT 

AND 

BREEZY 




As a comedian-deejay. Wally Phillips 
of WGN has created a big stir in the Windy City 



■ Wally Phillips of WGN, Chicago, is one radio an- 
nouncer who'll never be at a loss for words. He admits 
he was so chatty as a youngster in Portsmouth, Ohio, 
that "even my mother was glad when I left home, 
because she couldn't get a word in when I was around." 
... At any rate, Wally has been creating a "stir" in 
the entertainment world ever since. At his breezy best, 
he is a satirist who delights in poking fun at all 
institutions he considers stuffy — especially in the radio 
and TV field. This is quite a switch for a youth who 
attended a seminary for three years, intending to become 
a priest. . . . Returning from the seminary to attend 
high school in Cincinnati, Wally wangled the lead in 
a play as "Brother Orchid," the part made famous in 
the movies by Edward G. Robinson. He joined the Air 
Force, though, before getting his diploma. . . . Wally 
later took night courses at Schuster-Martin School of 
Drama, made some tapes and accepted a disc-jockey 
post at WJEF in Grand Rapids, Michigan. At WSAI 
and then at WCPO, both in Cincinnati, Wally gained 
himself a reputation as a humorist and satirist by 
opening fire on the tired routines used by deejays. It 
was at WCPO that he first conceived the idea of goofing 



up interviews which had been recorded with celebri- 
ties from a standard list of questions. Instead of open- 
ing with the script's line: "I guess it's a thrill to have 
a hit record going?" — Wally would cut it, "Don't you 
think your voice has gotten a little shaky over the 
past year?" To which the star's recorded reply would 
be: "I'll go along with that." Then instead of the re- 
quired "You've got a big record on its way up?" — be- 
fore the star's reply, "Well, luckily it's two" — Wally 
injected, "I'll give you credit for one thing: You've 
got a head on your shoulders." The star's recorded 
answers panicked Wally 's audiences and started him on 
a new gimmick — buying voice tracks. ... As Wally's 
ratings went up, he, too, climbed in the radio field — 
to WLW in Cincinnati in 1952 and on to WGN in 
1956. Over the years, his collection of voice tapes has 
grown and become a highlight of his shows. TV star 
Ben Alexander, who met Wally while touring the coun- 
try, declared him to be: "The cleverest interviewer I've 
met in any city." And, although Wally may occasionally 
cause station executives to turn gray overnight, with 
his unorthodox style of delivery and comic take-offs, 
he continues to wow his faithful listeners! 



59 







60 



At lop, child star Eddie Hodges joshes with Dave Allen (Captain) 
and Jim Bolen (Cooky). Below, Lone Ranger and gobs swap tales. 



Take a funland cruise with 



Jim Bolen and Dave Allen 



from KMOX-TV in St. Louis 






A couple of makebelieve seafaring 
characters hoist a mythical ramp, 
cast off and sail the S.S. Popeye from 
KMOX-TV in St. Louis, each weekday 
at 4:00, and at 11:30 on Saturday morn- 
ings. They're heading on a cruise laden 
with fun, cartoons and extra special sur- 
prises for "little people." . . . Dave 
Allen (the Captain) and Jim Bolen 
(Cooky) have been classed as the most 
influential babysitters in an area where 
there are more than 859,000 TV homes. 
for records show that they've captured 
more than 50 percent of the TV audi- 
ence with their show for the past three 
years. The list of adventurers waiting to 
receive a boarding pass for the "Peanut 
Gallery" of the show extends into May. 
. . . Allen, 6'2", can wield his 220 
pounds into the chair of the station's 
Farm Director (when the latter's away ) : 
don a service-station attendant's uniform 
and sell automotive wares (which he 
does) ; emcee a variety show (which 
he does frequently) ; and star in a stage 
production with the finesse of a pro. 
. . . Bolen — 5'9", and 70 pounds less 
than Allen — can nevertheless lift the 
greatest of melodies from a set of vibes 
and piano keyboard. Though he once 
drummed and sang his way with the 
Benny Goodman and Ted Weems travel- 
ing bands in 1949, Bolen has forsaken 
percussion sidelines and currently main- 
tains a busy free-lancing schedule with 
a six-voice singing group and combo- 
turning out commercial jingles for ad 
agencies. . . . Both personalities are 
veterans in the broadcast entertainment 
field. Allen found a part-time anounce- 
ing job in 1947 while he was attending 







Dave rehearses for starring rote 
in "Make a Million,'" as Sue throws 
rues, and wife Hilda lends an ear. 



At home, Jim shoivs off his antique 
mug collection to Melissa, Pamela, 
wife Liz, Belinda and tiny Chris. 



Western State College, Macomb. Illinois. 
But Bolen did not have to search the 
field — he was born in the trunk of par- 
ents who traveled the Orpheum circuit. 
At the age of three, he was a song-and- 
dance act with his talented mother; and 
when he reached his teens, he found 
himself with the Special Services divi- 
sion of the U.S. Navy, working the en- 
tertaining circuits. After the war, Bolen 
formed a singing group and joined the 
Kate Smith radio show out of New York. 
. . . On their TV programs, the team 
works without scripts and develops plots 
and situations as they go along. "We 
reduce ourselves to the broadest possible 
humor," says Bolen, "looking for a good 
way to finish — and then build up the 
show to that point." Allen adds. "Also, 
we have to remember that the little 
people believe so much in characters that 
l hey become upset and cry if someone 
gets hurt or is in trouble. Most important 
— you must enjoy your work, because 
kids spot it if you don't." . . . Both men 
own and operate two music shops. And 
despite heavy schedules, Allen owns a 
restaurant, is active in little-theater work, 
loves to fly-fish Missouri streams for small- 
mouth bass, and enjoys woodworking, 
music and writing. Bolen's hobby is col- 
lecting antique phonographs. . . . Allen 
and Bolen have become heroes to their 
own children, too. Dave's eight-year-old 
Susan constantly helps out on script 
reading assignments, and Jim's three 
daughters — Belinda, 12; Pamela, 9; and 
Melissa, 6 — take pleasure in rehearsing 
song routines with their father. Bolen 
says Chris, 1%, is being groomed musi- 
<;ill\ to accompany his singing sisters. 







61 




I 



Mme. Slack's primary goal — which she accomplishes beautifully — is to encourage her students 
to think in French and thus assimilate the language as naturally as they did their mother tongue. 



62 





Bouquets are in order 

for KETV in Omaha — it offers 

educational programs 

for pupils and parents alike 




Anne is also a favorite camera subject for husband Raymond, son Larry. 



Thanks to KETV (Omaha) and Mme. Anne Slack, several 
thousand third- and fourth-grade pupils are learning 
French via TV by watching Parlous Franqais. And this is 
only part of the unique educational service offered by KETV. 
Since September, the commercial station has devoted eight 
hours each week to telecasting fourteen instructional courses, 
including social studies, arithmetic, science and English, 
along with French. At present, some twenty school systems 
in eastern Nebraska are using this specialized classroom 
service, reaching approximately 25,000 pupils in the state's 
largest "school." . . . Except for the French course, which 
is on film, the courses are produced live with experienced 
teachers at the University of Nebraska's education station, 
KUON-TV, in Lincoln. Then, with the aid of translators in 
Central Nebraska, they are simulcast by KETV. . . . Parlous 
Franqais is also unique — the first and only in-school TV 
course of instruction offered on a national basis. Mme. Slack 
uses the "audio-lingual" method of instruction, avoiding the 
use of the written word entirely during the first two years 
of the program, so the students will learn to think in French. 
Following her two fifteen-minute French lessons each week, 
a classroom teacher follows up with her own lessons. . . . The 
star and teacher of Parlous Franqais is a sparkling, brown- 
eyed native Frenchwoman, who sprinkles her personal cor- 
respondence with exclamation points, a habit that reveals 
much about her personality. But Mme. Slack lays claim to 
more than beauty and a winning way with children. A teacher 
of broad classroom experience, she transferred her rare 
ability to the TV screen some eight years ago when TV teach- 
ing was just an infant stepchild of education. For six years 



at WRGB in Schenectady, New York, she was the teacher. 
writer and producer of Fun With French, a live TV course 
sponsored by Schenectady Public Schools. Her success 
brought her to the attention of the Modern Language As- 
sociation and finally to the Massachusetts Council for Public 
Schools, which was seeking ways and means to develop a 
foreign-language program to be used in the elementary- 
grades. With a grant from the Ford Foundation, Federal and 
other funds, the Modern Language Project of Boston was 
established and Mme. Slack became one of the pioneer 
planners and motivating forces that led to the Parlous Fran- 
qais series. Today, this conversational French course is being 
telecast to an estimated audience of two million elementary 
school pupils in 43 metropolitan areas from New York to 
San Francisco and from Calgary, Canada, to Tampa, Florida. 
. . . Mme. Slack majored in English and Latin and also 
graduated from the Paris Conservatory. She was awarded the 
"Meritorious Service Award" by the United States for her 
services as intepreter and translator to U.S. Army Head- 
quarters in Algeria and Morocco during World War II. 
During this time, she met and married GI Raymond E. Slack 
Jr., who brought her to the United States as a war bride 
in 1947. The Slacks now live in Marblehead, Massachusetts, 
with their 13-year-old son, Larry. . . . With KETV simulcast- 
ing educational programs, the coverage has been increased 
to homes and schools in more than 100 counties in four 
states. Now, when Johnny comes home, Mom or Dad can talk 
knowingly with him about what he learned in school that day. 
No wonder KETV and Johnny's family say, "C'est mag- 
nifique!" It's such a wonderful way to learn! 



63 



A MARKED MAN ? 

Was Mitch Michael of WOKY destined 
for a successful radio career? Going by 
his large listening audiences — yes! 



1 




He's in great demand at record hops in the area. 





"Karting" fan Michael has won many trophies. 



■ "My mother says, with tongue in cheek, that I was 
marked before birth to be in radio — because, a few 
weeks before I was born, she made a tour of KTUL. 
Tulsa, which was just being opened for the first time. 
Secondly, she says that my first words were noises like 
a radio announcer." reports Terrell Metheny Jr. Des- 
tined? Well, Mitch Michael, the musical director of 
WOKY Radio in Milwaukee, heard Mon.-Sat. from 3 
to 7 p.m., is none other than Terrell. . . . "As far back 
as I can remember, I wanted a radio career," he says. 
And he's had one for nine of his 26 years. ... A 
native of Van Buren, Arkansas, Mitch started with a 
teen-age deejay show for KFPW in neighboring Fort 
Smith during high school days and, upon gradua- 
tion, received a scholarship from KTUL to attend the 
University of Tulsa. He later worked full time at Sta- 
tion KTUL. "With the influence of KTUL on myself, 
perhaps my mother was right," comments Mitch. . . . 
In rapid succession — using the names of Ronn Terrell 
and Terrell L. Metheny Jr.— Mitch was program director 
of KWOS in Jefferson City, Missouri; assistant program 
director at KANS in Wichita (now KLEO) ; and deejay 
at WKDA in Nashville, before coming to WOKY. At 
Nashville, Wichita and Tulsa, Mitch's ratings zoomed to 
number-one. Altogether, Mitch has done everything from 
sweeping floors to writing copy . . . from announcing 
parades and sports events to spinning records. ... "I 
guess I'm like a printer with ink in his veins or an 
actor with the theater in his blood — I wouldn't be happy 
in any other type of work," says Mitch. His ambition is 
to devote most of his waking hours to radio, with the 
ultimate goal of going through the channels of deejay, 
then program director, station manager and — someday 
— owner of his own station. . . . Blue eyes, brown crew- 
cut, young, single, and with the Army behind him, Mitch 
is publicized as the "most eligible bachelor in show busi- 
ness." He lists his hobbies as dating, reading, dating, 
swimming, dating, racing go-karts, and dating. With his 
assured success in the radio world, the next big question 
seems to be: When is Michael marked for marriage? 



64 



A New Love for Lucy 

(Continued from page 43) 
husband. . . ." But her hand shook a 
i rifle as the big, broad-shouldered man 
beside her lifted it to slip the ring on her 
finger. 

"I now pronounce you man and wife." 
There was a pause then, as the two show- 
business stars stood, not knowing quite 
what to do. The minister broke the si- 
lence: "Let me introduce you to Mr. and 
Mrs. Gary Morton." She turned then, as 
brides have from time immemorial, to re- 
ceive her husband's kiss. She smiled, the 
radiant smile of a woman in love, and all 
the tension and doubt were over. She 
hugged Paula Stewart, the girl who had 
introduced them, and Paula's husband. 
Jack Carter. She reached for her two 
children, and her mother, and Gary's 
mother. Suddenly all was laughter and 
rears and gaiety inside the dignified walls 
of New York's Marble Collegiate Church. 

"They're waiting outside, Lucy," some- 
one said, minutes later. "There must be 
a thousand people out there." 

The warm smile reserved for those she 
loves best disappeared as Lucille Ball 
Arnaz Morton, taking her husband's arm. 
walked out the door to their car — and the 
mass of photographers and reporters and 
people waiting there, who crowded against 
the police barricades as cameras clicked 
and flash bulbs popped. "Kiss him, Lucy." 
"Let's have one without the veil, Lucy." 

The quiet, dignified service was over. 
It was the public image of Lucy, the clown 
with the sharp wit, they wanted. The 
Lucy known the nation over answered 
their questions, posed for "just one more" 
picture, waved gaily at the crowd, and 
ducked the shower of rice on her way to 
the car. 

No, they hadn't time for a honeymoon 
just now. She was rehearsing for a TV 
special which was to be taped from No- 
vember 29 to December 3. Gary, mean- 
while, had a commitment in Las Vegas — 
and, marriage or no marriage, "the show 
must go on." But they were snatching a 
few days at the Concord Hotel, up in the 
Catskills, and would be together for the 
holidays, in Lucy's home in Beverly Hills. 

. Later, in January, they'd have time for 
a real honeymoon, in Acapulco. . . . Yes. 
they planned to live in California, in the 
big house which became Lucy's as part of 
her divorce settlement. . . . Yes, both 
planned to continue their careers, though 
not together. . . . Yes, she and Desi would 
continue to share custody of their chil- 
dren. . . . Yes. . . . 

And at last, after the reporters and pho- 
tographers had had their innings, and 
they'd said goodbye to their relatives and 
friends in a flood of champagne, it was 
over. Mr. and Mrs. Gary Morton set out 
for the two-hour drive through the New 
York countryside for an all-too-brief res- 
pite before they took up their crowded 
lives once more. 

(Continued on next page i 




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65 



How did Lucy feel as she stood before 
the altar on that bright Sunday afternoon 
of November 19 while her long-time 
friend, the eminent Dr. Norman Vincent 
Peale, pronounced the words that were to 
so change her life? How does any clown 
feel at a time too serious or too sacred for 
jests? 

Did she remember the time, twenty-one 
years before, when she had promised to 
love, honor and cherish — or was it 
"obey"? — another man? Did she think 
fleetingly of that other man, Desi Arnaz? 
He had sent his best wishes. "He likes 
Gary," she had told the press. "He ac- 
cepts Gary." 

As she and Gary sped over the country 
roads, did she recall that other trip, 
twenty-one years before, when an im- 
petuous young movie actress and an equal- 
ly impetuous Cuban bongo-drummer had 
driven through a nearby countryside to 
say their "I do's" before a Greenwich. 
Connecticut justice of the peace? 

There were many similarities — and 
many of the same problems. She was bet- 
ter known than her bridegroom then, bet- 
ter established in the entertainment world. 
Now, once again, she had taken as her 
mate a man whose name spells less glit- 
ter than does hers, in the glittering world 
of makebelieve. Lucy didn't mind then, as 
she doesn't now. 

"It doesn't bother me," she said. "I just 
wanted to make sure it didn't bother him. 
But he had the right attitude — he's adult 
about it." 

And she hesitated only briefly because, 
like Desi, Gary is a few years younger 
than she — if a woman of Lucy's vibrancy 
can be pinpointed in years. 

"I'm glad he kept asking me. It was 
right — and it is right." 

Once more, too, there was the unhappy 
prospect of frequent separations. A come- 
dian who plays top-flight clubs from coast 
to coast must be away from home often, 



66 



just as Desi was in those earlier years. 

"We haven't discussed that much," Gary 
said thoughtfully, a few days before their 
marriage, when he was asked whether 
their dual careers and the resulting sepa- 
rations might not pose a threat to their 
happiness. "We are sure our happiness 
will work everything out. My main career 
is making her happy." 

And despite the similarities and the 
problems, Lucy's bid for happiness now is 
based on a new quality — fun. 

They had laughs and pizza on their 
first meeting, a blind date arranged by 
Paula Stewart, who had the ingenue role 
in "Wildcat," the play in which Lucy was 
starring. And, as one date led to another, 
and one laugh to more, a year went by. 
twelve months so filled with jokes and 
gaiety that Lucy, who had said only a few 
months before, "I'm afraid of marriage," 
could no longer resist. 

It had been a depressed Lucy who, after 
her divorce from Desi, had come to New 
York to pick up the threads of her life. 
She was the star of a Broadway play, fill- 
ing a theater each night with her own 
flaming personality. Her children were 
with her, and her mother. But, after the 
stage lights had dimmed and the audience 
had left the theater, it was a sad-faced 
clown who took off her make-up and went 
home to her luxurious apartment — alone. 

Lucy needed a guy, her friend Paula 
felt. Someone to take her to Sardi's or El 
Morocco, or any of the other night spots 
where show-business folk make merry 
after their night's work is over. . . . Some- 
one gay and fun, who could make her 
laugh, turn up the corners of her generous 
mouth, and bring back the sparkle to her 
eyes. 

So Paula arranged a date for her with 
an easy-going comedian who was appear- 
ing then at the Copacabana. She told Lucy 
something about him, of course . . •. that 
he came from the Bronx and had got into 



PLAY EDITOR 

MY FAVORITE STARS ARE: 



2-62 



ACTOR 



ACTRESS 



(I) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 

(I) 
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MY FAVORITE STORIES IN THIS ISSUE WERE: 



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show business as a result of being as- 
signed to special services when he was a 
GI. . . . that he'd been on Broadway in 
"Mr. Wonderful" but that mostly he 
played night clubs all the way from the 
Catskills to Las Vegas, mixing up imi- 
tations with gag trumpet-playing . . . that, 
like Lucy, he'd been married, a marriage 
which had ended in an annulment a few 
years before. 

"You'll like him," she said. "He's real- 
ly a very funny guy." 

Paula chose more wisely than she knew. 
Almost at once, life for Lucy began to be 
fun once more. 

That's all it was at first — fun. 

"My first impression of her was of her 
fantastic sense of humor," says Gary, his 
eyes crinkling as he recalls that first date. 
"She was working hard at the show and 
was dead tired, but it couldn't cloud over 
her happy spirit. We had a lot of fun to- 
gether. . . . But I had no inkling it would 
ever lead to marriage." 

The weeks passed . . . and the months. 
From the beginning, when Gary was work- 
ing out of town, telegrams — the crazier the 
better — flew back and forth between them. 
Later, after Lucy had returned to the West 
Coast, Gary found excuses for being there, 
too. They were together here, there, every- 
where. Lucy's eyes sparkled once again; 
the corners of her mouth turned up in a 
radiant smile. 

"We just seemed to turn around — and 
a year had passed. We couldn't help think- 
ing what a beautiful year we had spent 
together. We wanted to continue having 
beautiful years together." 

And so, in that New York church on a 
bright Sunday afternoon in November, 
they made their vows. The woman who had 
struggled for years to achieve fame and 
fortune, only to have them turn bitter in 
her mouth, was determined now to find 
happiness. 

"I want a happy quiet life." 

Life with Desi was many things. It was 
tempestuous, exciting, unpredictable. It 
included quarrels — and reconciliations. 
Happy, certainly, at times, else it would 
not have lasted so long. But quiet? Never. 
Fun? Nobody, in all their years together, 
ever suggested that theirs was a fun-shared 
marriage. 

As Hollywood saw it, they were an ill- 
matched pair from the start. Desi was a 
volatile Cuban, with the reputation for 
being a playboy that all Latins in show 
business have. Lucille Ball was tagged as 
a brash and sophisticated blonde who was 
inevitably cast in "other woman" roles. 
Hollywood gave their marriage six months. 
Deep down inside — where she was still a 
frightened girl from Jamestown, New 
York — Lucy wasn't that optimistic. "I gave 
us six weeks," she said, when it was ended, 
in May, 1960, in a Santa Monica divorce 
court. 

As was the custom in Spanish families, 
no matter where or for how long trans- 
planted, Desi was the master of the house, 
from the beginning. The lesser star in the 



eyes of the public, he reigned supreme at 
home, to be waited on, catered to. Lucy 
said she loved it. But as both pursued the 
careers which kept them separated so 
much of the time, there were quarrels . . . 
reconciliations . . . quarrels. 

Lucy is not a girl who gives up easily. 
She was fired from more than one job 
when, at sixteen, she braved New York 
in an attempt to get a toe-hold in the big 
and wonderful world of show business. 
She refused to give up then; lived in a 
cheap furnished room and haunted neigh- 
borhood cafeterias, picking up left-over 
scraps of food to relieve that empty ache 
in her stomach. Later, when she was told 
she would never walk again, after an ac- 
cident had struck her down, she was back 
modeling within two years. 

The same determination made her re- 
fuse to give up on her marriage. When 
Desi's Cuban temper exploded, Lucy 
clowned him out of it. Even when, in 1944, 
she got as far as the divorce court, she 
changed her mind before the final decree 
was handed down, determined to keep her 
marriage together. And, ten years after 
their civil ceremony, she went through a 
religious ceremony in the Catholic church 
of which Desi was a member. 

It was to save the marriage which both 
knew was tottering that / Love Lucy was 
born. With it came success, bigger than 
Lucy had ever dreamed of. She became 
America's darling, but what made her 
happiest was Desi's recognition as one of 
the most important and highly respected 
men in the then new and burgeoning field 
of television. 

There was all the fame . . . and all the 
acclaim. There were, at last, the children 
she had so wanted: Lucie Desiree, born in 
1951, just four weeks before / Love Lucy 
was launched . . . and, two years later, 
with all the world waiting anxiously, Desi 
IV, whose birth has been set down in a 
new history book as one of the great emo- 
tional events of the last decade. 

What else is needed for a happy mar- 
riage? A house in Beverly Hills, staffed 
with efficient servants? A place in Palm 
Springs for weekends? A Cadillac to 
match a woman's blue eyes? They had 
them all . . . and more. 

But happiness does not consist only of 
fame and acclaim, of luxurious homes and 
furs and jewels and all the other things 
money can buy. It is not made up, always, 
even of children. Or of trips to Europe, or 
even of buying the entire movie studio 
where both were working when they met. 

As their empire grew, Desi became more 
and more immersed in work. And the 
harder he worked, the harder he played. 
In the summer of 1959, for the first time 
since / Love Lucy became television's top 
show, they did not vacation together. That 
Christmas, while Desi spent the holiday in 
Palm Springs, Lucy and the children were 
in Sun Valley. Their conversations, at least 
when others were present, were brief and 
business-like. Tension on the set increased. 

And, the day after she received a final 



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screen kiss from her husband of nineteen 
years, Lucy gave up. 

When she appeared in court that day in 
May, she was a picture of unhappiness. 
The last three years, she testified, had 
been a nightmare. There were tears in her 
eyes and in her voice as she told some- 
thing of their problems — enough to con- 
vince the judge divorce was the only answer. 

To outsiders, even to many of the peo- 
ple who knew them, Lucy seemed the re- 
luctant one. The one who, though she had 
taken the decisive step, hoped deep down 
to win back her man. 

They divided all their possessions down 
to the last golf cart (for Desi) and the 
cemetery plot (for Lucy). There was little 



bitterness about the division — there were 
millions for both. And, while Desi car- 
ried on as head of their company, Desilu. 
Lucy buried herself in work. First came a 
movie, her first in five years, with Bob Hope. 

"Am I happy?" she said then, in an- 
swer to a reporter's question. "No. Not 
yet. But I will be. I've been humiliated. 
That's not easy for a woman." 

And while Desi worked and brooded 
and attempted to quench the flame of his 
torch with other girls ... in New York. 
Lucy was keeping her word. She had said 
that she would be happy. And, as the 
weeks and months went by, she was. . . . 
Made for fun and happiness, how can 
she miss? 



67 



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That Marvelous Man Moore 



(Continued from page 18) 
tho^e crazy songs of his. I don't recall 
what Garry Moore did. It wasn't that 
Garry didn't make an impression on me 
or that I didn't like him on the radio. 
Not at all. The simple fact is that I was 
so young I wasn't allowed to listen to 
the radio that late at night. Occasionally, 
I'd sneak a listen in my bedroom. When- 
ever I did hear Garry and Jimmy, I was 
hreaking the family law. 

I suppose if I wanted to make points 
with my boss I should go on record here 
that he was my idol from that early age. 
But, from what I've already told you, 
you'd know that was nonsense. And, after 
all, I guess magazine stories these days 
are supposed to be controversial. 

Well, here's some controversy: My fa- 
vorite radio program, at the particular 
stage of my life I've been discussing, was 
Let's Pretend, a fairy tale that was broad- 
cast on Saturday mornings. I was bugged 
on Let's Pretend. It got me right here, 
if you know what I mean. 

My ambition at the time was to become 
a writer or an artist. Being a comedienne 
was the farthest thing from my mind. If 
anyone laughed at me in those days, I'd 
run home and hide in the closet. 

However, I had heard of Garry Moore. 
That's something. 

As I left grammar school and went on 



to high school and college (U.C.L.A.), 
Garry left Jimmy Durante and radio and 
moved over to that infant medium called 
television. Gary had a morning program 
of his own on TV. Again, I suppose I 
should say that this program thrilled me. 

It didn't. I never saw it. Remember, 
I was attending classes during the morn- 
ing. However, I began to hear and read 
more and more about Moore. (How's that 
for a tricky play on words?) 

When I was in college, my ambition 
changed. I decided to give up my plans 
to become a novelist or an artist, in favor 
of a career in the entertainment profes- 
sion. I don't recall what caused me to 
change. Perhaps I was spending too much 
time hiding in the closet. 

At any rate, like so many other aspiring 
performers who dream of seeing their 
name in lights on Broadway and all that 
malarky, I packed my bags, crossed my 
eyes, and came to New York. (Perhaps 
I'd been influenced too much by those 
fairy tales on Let's Pretend.) 

I became one of the fortunate few. In 
November of 1956, I was given an op- 
portunity to audition for that "old-timer" 
I used to hear on the radio occasionally — 
Garry Moore. 

I decided to do a take-off on girls au- 
ditioning for a Broadway show. Nervous 
as all get-out, I showed up at the studio 



to do my stuff. I looked into the control 
booth, and there he sat. He smiled at me. 
I'll never forget it. 

Auditions are one of the toughest things 
in show business because there is seldom 
a way to determine if you are doing well 
or laying a bomb. Until you are finished, 
that is. There's no audience. Only you, 
and a few strange people with an expres- 
sion on their faces that seems to say: 
Okay, let's get it over with. 

During my audition, I kept looking at 
Garry in the control booth. I couldn't 
hear him, of course, but he continued 
to smile and to laugh. This was encour- 
aging, but I still didn't know if he was 
laughing at me or with me. 

Afterward, I was ushered into his office. 
The first thing I noticed was that Garry 
really wasn't old. He must have started 
when he was very young. A child prodigy, 
or something like that. 

"Would you like to be on my morning 
show?" he asked me. That was like ask- 
ing a sailor if he'd like a date with Marilyn 
Monroe ! 

I appeared on his program nine or ten 
times. And that was the start. As a direct 
result of those performances, I was booked 
to appear on major nighttime programs 
with Ed Sullivan and Dinah Shore. 

Everything I am in this business I owe 
to Garry Moore. When I needed a break. 




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70 



a head for 
FIGURES 



Ask Joan Freeman, who plays Elma, 
the cute waitress at Grace's 
Diner in ABC- TV's Bus Stop, and she'll 
tell you, "I'm a sensible type — that's 
the kind of girl I am." As a "for in- 
stance," Joan points out that she's "dy- 
ing to play older parts." She adds, 
"After all, I'm really twenty, though 
you wouldn't believe it, seeing me in 
Bus Stop, with my hair in a pony-tail, 
me in an apron or slacks, and acting 
it up like a seventeen-year-old. The way 
I see myself in private is terribly chic, 
my hair fluffed out bouffant, on stilt 
heels and with dresses that at least 
hint at my 35-19-35 measurements. But, 
as I say, I'm a sensible type. So, when 
other actresses tell me to be patient 
because, ten years from now, I'll wish 
I could play a teenager, I say to my- 
self, 'Joanie, these people have been 
in the business a long time and they 
know. So be sensible, Joanie, and hold 
your horses.' "... Joan — who was 
born in Council Bluffs, Iowa, but 
brought up in Burbank, California- 
may carry her pretty head high, but 
it's seldom in the clouds. She is play- 
ing it safe by going to U.C.L.A. a cou- 
ple of nights a week. "I'm studying 
to become a certified public account- 
ant," she explains. "Acting is fun and 
very exciting . . . but not always de- 
pendable. I want something to fall back 
on. I'm a girl with my head on my 
shoulders." . . . Joan says that her big- 
gest thrill is traveling. She can "burble 
endlessly" about her trip to Italy, where 
she appeared in "Come September," 
for Universal-International. "I love see- 
ing new places and meeting new peo- 
ple." She was recently named "Miss 
Pro-Am" for the 1961 golf tournament 
at the Hotel Sahara, Las Vegas. About 
her experiences in that "fun town," 
she says : "I was fascinated by all those 
lines of people throwing money into 
those machines. I decided to do some 
playing, too. I bought two dollars' 
worth of nickels but decided to be 
sensible and not throw them into the 
slots. Instead, I bought myself a nice 
lunch for the money." ... In the 
romantic department, Joan refuses to 
make any definite statements. "A boy 
called me up the other evening," she 
recalls, "and he said, 'Tell me the 
truth . . . are you engaged?' and I said, 





Off TV, actress Joan Freeman 
studies tax forms. On TV, 
the male viewers are 
much more interested in hers 



'Certainly, I'm engaged. I'm brushing 
my hair.' And that's as far as I'll com- 
mit myself about romance. A number 
of eligible young Hollywoodites have 
been attracted by her tresses and pi- 
quant beauty. Joan describes her ap- 
peal as being the result of her "having 
my feet on terra firma. Also, at income- 
tax time, I'm convenient to know. I'm 
familiar with the forms." However, 
there's no question that it's her form, 
and not the Government's, the males 
are interested in. Joan herself says, 
"With two nights a week at college, 
and so much rehearsing and lines to 
be learned, I don't have a lot of time 
for dating. I will say this: When the 
right man comes along, I'll know it, 
and I'll act . . . because taking a hus- 
band isn't like buying a car. When 
I saved enough money to buy a car, 
I decided not to get flashy, but to be 
sensible and buy a Volkswagen. But 
when I fall in love, I'm going to show 
my good sense by not being sensible 
at all. I'm going to let my heart, not 
my head, guide me. You see, in many 
serious matters like religion or mar- 
riage, you can't figure things out cold 
turkey. You must have some strong 
faith and emotional strength to rely on." 



he gave me one. More important, when I 
needed a friend, he became one. 

This may sound sickening to those who 
prefer to have their idols smashed, but 
Garry Moore is the nicest man I've met in 
or out of show business. I make my living 
by being a comedienne. However, it's im- 
possible for me to even attempt to be fun- 
ny when I speak of Garry. 

The Garry Moore Show is considered a 
"family" show. And it really is one. I've 
heard of employers who tell new em- 
ployees: "We're one big happy family 
here." And then they begin to pick their 
pockets. That isn't the case with Garry. 
He fills your pockets — and your heart. 

During the 1959-60 Broadway season, 
while I was appearing in a musical called 
"Once Upon A Mattress," I began doubling 
as a regular on Garry's Tuesday-night 
program (seen on CBS-TV from 10 to 11 
P.M. EST). I've been with him ever since. 
I know the man. Very, very well. We've 
worked closely together. I've had every op- 
portunity to see his good side and his bad 
side. I've yet to see the latter. 

Like most of us, I've been fooled by first 
impressions. Some people I've met — who, 
I thought, were going to become friends — 
have turned out to be opportunists. They 
liked me as long as they believed I could 
do something for them. 

If I've learned nothing else, I've learned 
that there is a big difference between 
friends and acquaintances. We all have 
many acquaintances, but most of us have 
few true friends. Garry Moore is a friend. 
When I met him, I expected to meet a 
nice man. I met the nicest. Why? I can 
hear someone saying, "Sure, she likes him 
— he pays her a big salary." 
That's not it, at all. 

Anyone who knows Garry well can talk 
to him — about professional or personal 
problems. He's like a close relative. I feel 
that I can tell him anything and be con- 
fident that what I say will not be repeated. 
I guess I'm making him sound like a 
saint. Well, I can't help it. I was asked to 
write what I think about Garry Moore, 
and that's what I think. 

In the five years I've known him, I've 
never seen him lose his temper. I've never 
seen him blow up, and he's had many a 
reason to do so. He must have bad days. 
After all, he's human. But when he does, 
he doesn't let anyone know it. He wants 
to have a happy show, believes the best 
way to have one is to be happy himself. 
Garry Moore is, naturally, the head of 
The Garry Moore Show. However, he's 
not the "boss." Not in the general sense 
of the word. Personally, I never think of 
him as being the boss. 

People frequently ask me if Garry is 
a religious man. Well, we don't talk about 
it. But he must be. No one could be as 
good as he is without being religious. 

What do we talk about? Many things. 
For one thing, we kid around a lot. Garry 
likes to laugh, and to make others laugh. 
But he — and we — know when to kid, and 
when not to. 

He has his serious side. He talks with 



conviction, and becomes very worked up, 
when discussing the world situation or 
subjects like racial bias. He's the most 
unprejudiced man I've ever met. Any form 
of bigotry makes him burn. 

We seldom mix socially, except when we 
are on the road. You know, traveling to 
California or somewhere to do our show. 
The reason for this is that he's busy when 
he's in New York, and so am I. 

In addition to his regular Tuesday- 
night program, he stars on I've Got A 
Secret on Monday nights, over CBS-TV, 
and also tapes a weekday show for CBS 
Radio. I also have a CBS Radio program, 
with Richard Hayes, which is heard Mon- 
day through Friday from 7:10 to 7:30 P.M. 
EST. So, you can see, neither of us has 
much time left over for social events. 

When Garry does have a few free mo- 
ments, he spends them at home with his 
lovely wife, Nell. Incidentally, Nell and 
I have been told we look alike. I hope she 
doesn't mind my saying so. 

Garry is an extensive reader — second to 
none, except maybe President Kennedy. 
He's not just a Book-of-the-Month-Club- 
type reader. He digs serious books. Reads 
about everything. That's why he's such a 
good talker. 

He has the faculty of being able to look 
into the camera and talk directly to you 
at home. And he's completely natural when 
he does it. I can't do it. I have to be a 
"character" of some sort. 

I wish I could tell you more anecdotes. 
I know that they are expected in stories 
like this. But when Garry does nice things 
for people, he doesn't make them known. 
He's not one of those people who say, 
"I just did this-or-that for him-or-her." 

But this one I can tell you. 

Last spring, when we were in Cali- 
fornia to do a show, Gale Storm was sup- 
posed to be one of our guest stars. She 
was going to appear in a sketch with me. 
A day or two before we were scheduled to 
tape, Gale became ill and was forced to 
cancel her appearance. 

Barbara Nelson, one of the dancers on 
the show, was offered the chance to fill 
in for her. Garry often does that: Gives 
an unknown an opportunity. Well, Barbara 
stayed up all night to learn the part. She 
did very well, performed like a trouper. 

Instead of just patting Barbara on the 
back and giving her a few extra bucks, 
Garry gave her a huge, fat gift certificate. 
He told her, "If I give you money, you'll 
spend it on someone else. This is for you 
to use on yourself." 

That's it. 

From what I understand, stories about 
nice people are rare these days. People 
want to read sick bits, articles full of 
controversy. That would be impossible 
when it comes to Garry Moore. 

He may sound too good to be true. Per- 
haps he goes home and beats the barn 
door weekends. I wouldn't know about 
that. The Garry Moore I do know is the 
one I've told you about. 

He's a nice guy. and that's all there is 
to it. So help me. 



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71 



TV's Durable Darlings 



(Continued from page 55) 
already had a radio show — began being 
seen as well as heard. ... In an indus- 
try where, experts agree, five years is a 
life-time for any show, Garry and John 
and Ed and Perry are still carrying on 
a love-affair with the American public. 

So is Bill Cullen, who has been woo- 
ing it even longer. Since he began em- 
ceeing Winner Take All in 1946, Bill's 
never been missing from the TV scene. 
For the last five years, he's been heading 
up The Price Is Right — and, for exactly 
twice as long, has been a panelist on 
I've Got A Secret. 

There are a lot of reasons for the en- 
during popularity of any television per- 
sonality. In the case of one William 
Lawrence Cullen — no actor, no singer or 
dancer, and no matinee-idol type — the 
general consensus is that it's warmth and 
informality, coupled with an enthusiasm 
which hasn't dimmed in all his years in 
show business. It's doubtful that anyone, 
including the taxi driver who delivers 
him to the studio each day. calls him 
anything but "Bill." He's that type, and 
always has been. 

"I love my work and have no desire 
to be anything but what I am, a TV host 
and panelist," Bill said last fall. And it 
shows. So does his boundless enthusiasm, 
which got him into radio to begin with. 

As a kid back in Pittsburgh, midget- 
car racing was his dish, and he learned 
enough about the internal workings of 
automobiles so that — when the family fi- 
nances forced him to leave college — he 
was able to hold down a job as a garage 
mechanic. There, the imitations of radio 
favorites with which the effervescent youth 
entertained his co-workers landed him a 
chance as an announcer with a local sta- 
tion — and Bill was on his way. 

By 1944. the 24-year-old was making 
$400 a week with KDKA, but gave it up 
in favor of a $55-a-week job in New York. 
He's doing somewhat better now. When 
lie quit his local radio show last fall, to 
devote himself exclusively to television, 
his income was admittedly in the six-figure 
bracket. 

Bill is one of the few folk who appear 
regularly on more than one network. Price 
is on NBC-TV. But Monday nights, after 
he's totaled up each contestant's winnings. 
Bill strolls over to CBS-TV for I've Got 
t Secret. Other panelists have come and 



gone during the ten years this program 
has been on the air, but two of America's 
favorites — Bill and the show's host, Garry 
Moore— are perennials. 

Another who's been able to hurdle the 
barbed-wire entanglement which separates 
the networks is John Daly. While, as 
vice-president, he was heading up the news 
department at ABC-TV, a post he re- 
signed a year ago, John was also appear- 
ing regularly on CBS-TV Sunday nights 
as moderator of What's My Line? 

Since he dipped into radio newscasting 
in 1937, the 47-year-old Daly has been 
reporting news stories all over the world. 
(It was while he was covering the Presi- 
dential campaign of 1956 that he met 
Chief Justice Earl Warren's daughter Vir- 
ginia, who became Mrs. Daly a year ago.) 
John still thinks of his work as reporter 
and commentator as his bread-and-butter 
— and his moderating as the jam. But it 
is as moderator of What's My Line?. 
where he can display his urbane charm, 
that he is best known to the American 
public. 

The Daly charm, suavity, and accent 
derive from Johannesburg, South Africa, 
where he was born, with a veneer of 
Boston, where he grew up and attended 
college. Actually, What's My Line? takes 
very little of John's time. The show is 
unrehearsed, and there are no lines to 
learn. He arrives at the studio at 10:10. 
dusts on a little powder and, at 10:30. 
is ready to introduce contestants to his 
panel of professionals: Dorothy Kilgallen. 
Arlene Francis and Bennett Cerf, all of 
whom have been with the show since its 
inception. A few minutes after 11:00, he's 
on his way home — having earned, it's 
reported. $3500 for his evening's work. 

JNot everyone gets into show business 
by sitting at a drugstore counter, wait- 
ing to be "discovered." Can you imagine 
Ed Sullivan, for instance, perched at a 
soda fountain listening for those magic 
words, "You ought to be in TV"? 

Ed began as a newspaper man. and 
still thinks of himself as one. As a Broad- 
way columnist for The New York Daily 
News, he knew a lot of people in the 
entertainment world. When the paper be- 
gan putting on benefits, Ed was drafted 
to round up the stars to appear. Along 
with that, he was given the job of em- 
ceeing the shows. From this beginning 



72 



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evolved a radio show and, in 1948, Toast 
Of The Town — as The Ed Sullivan Show 
was originally called. 

Ed makes no pretense of being a "per- 
sonality." His job, as he sees it, is to 
introduce the performers and let them 
carry the entertainment ball. It is his 
news sense, most people agree, which has 
made and kept him one of TV's most pop- 
ular stars. 

Television was a dirty word in Holly- 
wood when Ed's show first appeared on 
home screens, but the "Unsmiling Irish- 
man" maneuvered dozens of movie stars 
onto his stage. Outstanding sports figures 
have almost invariably turned up on Ed's 
show, along with show-folk who were mak- 
ing news. When Julius LaRosa was given 
the heave-ho from the Godfrey empire, he 
was immediately signed up by Sullivan. 

Ed's budget, and his pay, were infini- 
tesimal at the beginning. On that first 
show, in 1948, he had $500 to spend, paid 
Martin and Lewis a nifty $200 for their 
spot. By 1956, he was paying Elvis Presley 
$50,000 for three appearances, without 
going into the red. 

Ed's take-home pay has become a good 
deal heftier through the years, too. And. 
last year, he signed a new thirty-year 
contract with CBS. By that time, Ed will 
be 91 — and presumably will have laid by 
enough money to retire on. 

While Ed was trying out his show, 
fourteen years ago, another fellow who 
wasn't much more at ease in front of a 
camera was making his TV debut, too. 
Fellow named Perry Como — who, like Ed. 
is still around and still doing fine. 

Perry didn't start off with much of a 
splash. He already had a fifteen-minute 
radio show, and someone upstairs got the 
idea that he might as well do it in front 
of the TV cameras. One thing led to 
another and, seven years later, the ex- 
barber from Canonsburg, Pennsylvania. 
was hosting an hour-long variety show on 
NBC-TV. He still is. 

A lot of other singers have come and 
gone, during those fourteen years, but 
Como — relaxed and ingratiating and vel- 
vet-voiced as ever — goes on, season after 
season. 

Perry Como's Kraft Music Hall is gay 
and light-hearted, as fitted to its star as 
his well-tailored suits and as impeccable 
as his private life. But all this doesn't 
necessarily spell success, and Perry has 
his own explanation for his long-playing 
love-affair with the American public. "You 
can go just so far with talent," he said, 
not long ago. "After that, if you make 
it big on television, it's because some- 
body's watching over you somewhere. I'm 
sure somebody's watching over me." 

Over Garry Moore, too, perhaps. In his 
eight years on daytime TV, Garry used 
every zany trick in the book, and more. 
He appeared in shorts, stuck his head 
in a lion's mouth, climbed the studio 
walls — and became the housewives* dar- 



■l 



ling. On his current show, he's more re- 
strained, but still the amiable fellow with 
the bow-tie and the crew-cut. 

Underneath that sandy hair, however, 
is a brain which shouldn't be under- 
estimated. Out of the Moore show came 
Candid Camera, one of the big hits of 
last season, and Garry can take bows 
for the regular appearances of talented 
Carol Burnett, voted TV's most popular 
girl star last year. 

If Garry wanted to have a whirl at 
-'That Wonderful Year of 1955," he'd 
have another show-stopper — with Lawrence 
Welk supplying the music, and James 
Arness and Richard Boone shooting it out 
in the action department. 

It was in July of that year that Welk 
and his band were slipped into Saturday 
night as a summer replacement on ABC- 
TV — and all the artillery the other net- 
works have brought up since has failed 
to dislodge him. 

The one-time farm boy from North 
Dakota, who learned music and show 
business the hard way, is a success story 
which has seldom been matched. Brought 
up in a family of high principles and 
low income, he never had a music lesson; 
left school after the fourth grade; spoke 
only German until he was twenty-one, 
and still has occasional trouble with his 
English. But, after twenty-two years' ex- 
perience, he's the most popular band 
leader in the nation, and the most 
highly paid. In 1960, his band grossed 
13,500,000. 

Much of Welk's success is. of course, 
due to his knack of knowing the kind 
of music the public wants, and his in- 
sistence on playing it. But he has also 
endeared himself to his millions of fans 
by his ability to present his "Champagne 
Music Makers" as one big, happy family, 
and by his constant attention to every 
detail of his show. A deeply religious 
man. Welk turns thumbs down on any 
song or costume or routine which might 
he in the least objectionable. His dance- 
able music, the wholesome quality of his 
show — and the Lennon Sisters — have 
entrenched him firmly in the heart of 
America. 

Thousands of bad guys have bit the 
dust, and dozens of Western heroes, too, 
since Gunsmoke first appeared on home 
screens. But the adventures of Marshal 
Dillon have remained so popular that, 
this season, the Saturday show was length- 
ened to an hour — while re-runs of the 
earlier half-hour version have also been 
shown. Tuesday nights, on the same 
network. CBS-TV. 

The doughty officer of the law is James 
Arness. A huge man — 6'6" and 220 pounds 
— lie fits perfectly the public image of 
the hero of the Old West. An unknown 
when the series began, he has become 
so associated with it that, when he be- 
came fidgety a couple of years ago, the 
network drew up a new contract which 
liives him a financial interest in the show 
and insures that, so Ion" as there's a 




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73 



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Gunsmoke, Jim will play Marshal Dillon. 

Admittedly "a bum" not many years 
ago, the Minneapolis-born Arness now 
owns a thousand-acre ranch, an expensive 
sports car, and can afford anything else 
he wants. The collapse of his marriage, 
during the work-packed days of his early 
success, is the only shadow on Jim's rosy 
present and future. 

It was in that same fall that another 
Western hero, Paladin, rode onto the TV 
screen and into the public's affections. 
The flamboyant hero of Have Gun — Will 
Travel, who can handle a champagne 
glass and a six-shooter with equal ease, 
is played by Richard Boone, as flam- 
boyant in his own way as is Paladin. 

Admittedly one of Hollywood's finest 
actors, thought certainly not one of its 
handsomest, Dick is such a stickler for 
perfection that he flexes his fingers before 
a scene which calls for him to fire a 
shot. Given a colorful character to begin 
with, he has played it to the hilt, allow- 
ing no interference. He'd walked off many 
a stage when things didn't go to suit him. 
But when he zooms up these days in his 
Rolls-Royce, attired snappily in a pair 
of purple Capri pants, what he says goes. 
He's the boss. 

Last summer, restless after so long in 
one role, he made a new deal with CBS. 
In return for more than a million dollars, 
he turned over to the network all the 
residual rights to the series, and agreed 
to film thirty more half-hour shows. At 
the end of that time, he figured, he could 
accept more of the other roles which are 
constantly being offered him. Or, if he 
chose, he'd never have to work again. But 
the public shows no sign of tiring of 
Paladin. By the end of the season, Boone 
may have a new, and irresistible, offer. 

Among the new shows in the fall of 
1957 was a modest, off-beat family comedy 
called The Real McCoys, on ABC-TV. 
The saga of a hillbilly family which had 
migrated to California, it didn't create 
much advance excitement. But it starred 
Walter Brennan, long one of Hollywood's 
finest character actors and the only star 
in movie history who has won three 
Academy Awards. As the lovable but 
irascible Amos McCoy, Brennan proceeded 
to win something else — the hearts of TV 
audiences. At 67, he had been in movies 
for forty-odd years, but it wasn't until 
the advent of The McCoys, he says, that 
he became a "celebrity." 

In person, he's no overalled illiterate, 
but a shrewd businessman who was prob- 
ably one of the better-fixed actors in the 
film colony, even before his success in 
the series — of which he is part owner. 
But he is also a New Englander, and not 
given to flinging his money around. When 
it's time for lunch on the McCoys set, 
Brennan opens the lunch box he's brought 
with him, and hauls out a tuna-fish sand- 
wich and a thermos of milk. Why not, 
he shrugs. He likes tuna-fish. 

It took the creator of that show two 
years to sell Brennan on the idea of play- 
ing Amos McCoy. Robert Stack became 



Eliot Ness on the spur of the moment — 
and a public idol overnight. 

Bob's contract runs out at the end of 
this season, the third for The Untouch- 
ables on ABC-TV, and it's considered un- 
likely that he'll renew. More money prob- 
ably wouldn't interest him; he comes from 
a prominent Los Angeles family and has 
always had plenty. At 43, he has many 
years ahead of him as an actor, and would 
like to accept some of the other roles 
which come his way. But he doesn't under- 
estimate what the series has done for 
him. As he said last summer, "I hope 
the millions of friends I've made as Ness 
will continue to remember me as Bob 
Stack." 

Plenty of other well-known movie actors 
have tried television to their sorrow, but 
nobody was surprised when My Three 
Sons — also seen over ABC-TV — was one 
of last season's hits. Fred MacMurray, 
long a movie favorite, has a casual, dis- 
arming charm that's hard to beat. He's 
just as casual about his success. "To 
me, things just happen," explains the 
man who was named television father of 
last year for his "warm and deft comedy 
portrayal." 

Fred is fifty-three, a man of simple 
tastes, and reputedly a millionaire, so it 
wasn't money that lured him onto home 
screens. It was a plan which would allow 
him to complete his work for the entire 
season in just three months, leaving him 
time for his family, his hunting and fish- 
ing, and for making a movie now and 
then, if he felt like it. He did; went to 
Europe last fall to film "Bon Voyage" for 
Walt Disney. 

Candid Camera got a spot of its own 
over CBS-TV on Sunday nights only last 
season, after it had been a successful 
feature of the Moore show. But its cre- 
ator, Allen Funt, has been practicing 
his legal eavesdropping since 1947. 

Funt certainly had no idea of a career 
in show business when he was attending 
Cornell, and doing graduate work at Co- 
lumbia and Pratt Institute. It was during 
his experience with the Army Signal 
Corps, where he learned about concealed 
wire recorders, that he dreamed up the 
"gimmick" which has occupied him ever 
since. 

After more than a million candid inter- 
views, he credits much of his success to 
the fact that he "looks like an average 
Joe." He has, in this time, become expert 
— particularly in his handling of children 
— and his interviews are calculated to 
entertain, but never to ridicule. As a 
result, a man who is totally unlike the 
popular image of a TV personality ap- 
pears weekly in one of the most popular 
shows on the air, and certainly should be 
the star of "That Wonderful Year of 
1960." 

New stars and new faces may come 
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The Facts of Life 






(Continued from page 47) 
in teaching our children an appreciation 
of the holy mystery of life's beginnings. 
We have tried to avoid telling too much, 
too soon. 

We like to begin the process gradually 
by instilling a sense of awe for all the 
transcendent powers of God. A helpful 
book, in this respect, is entitled, "How 
God Made You," and introduces the facts 
of human life, after marveling over some 
of the other wonders of creation. The 
book was written by a Catholic doctor, 
Robert P. Odenwald, M.D., illustrated by 
Mary Reed Newland, and published by 
Kenedy Publishing Company. 

Its dust-cover blurb reads, "If you won- 
der how it was you came into the world, 
your father or your mother will read this 
book to you. Or, if you are old enough, 
you can read it for yourself. 

"It explains how God created all things 
in the world — the plants, the animals, the 
birds, the fishes, and every human being. 
Of course, you know that people are dif- 
ferent from all the other creatures be- 
cause God gave us a soul as well as a 
body. 

"Dr. Odenwald tells how your life be- 
gan as a tiny, tiny seed, and how the seed 
grew until you became a baby. He also 
describes where you lived before you were 
born. This story is one of God's greatest 
miracles. . . ." 

After I had read the story — for the first 
time — to our Mimi, who is now six, she 
tipped back her head, beamed at me and 
asked, "You mean you and Daddy loved 
each other enough to have me?" 

"You and your ten brothers and sis- 
ters," I said. 

Mimi snuggled deeper into my arms 
while her bright glance roamed around 
our busy living room, where the other 
members of the family were engrossed in 
their own activities. One of her small, 
dimpled hands extended in a caressing 
gesture, as if she could waft tenderness 
to each. It revealed more eloquently than 
words that Mimi had learned well her first 
formal lesson in family love and loyalty, 
and in reverence for God. 

I know that some people, going to the 
opposite extreme from telling too much 
too soon, believe in withholding such in- 
formation until children are twelve to 
fourteen years old, but we think there 
is danger of an unfortunate, unclean in- 
terpretation being given to the facts of 
life if someone other than a child's par- 
ents or teachers sets the mood in which 
the knowledge is imparted, and directs the 
attitude with which it is received. 

The ten-year-old daughter of friends of 
ours indicated that she had been receiving 
certain curbside information when her 
parents undertook to prepare her for the 
birth of a brother or sister. She listened 
to her mother's story of the wonder of 
God creating mankind in His image, then 



announced with a sniff, "That's not what 
I've heard around school." 

Obviously, a sense of timing, a parental 
awareness of the extent of a child's devel- 
opment — the when of the thing — is as im- 
portant as what is told. 

Like most parents, Bill and I believe 
that object lessons are useful in putting 
across a point. When our Danny was on 
the way, Dianne was nine, Peggy was six, 
Kathy was four, and Janet was not quite 
two. We decided that we should buy a 
female dog who could illustrate the birth 
process by having puppies. 

Good idea, but bad puppy; she proved 
to be a night prowler. Repeatedly, she 
came up missing for several days at a 
time, finally disappeared permanently. The 
next dog perished in trying to cross a busy 
street against the light. The third puppy 
snapped at our new baby. We gave up 
the dog idea, and rejected taking on a cat 
for the same reasons. 

Our next experiment was with guppies, 
which— as most people know — are tiny 
"live-bearing minnows." The advantage 
of using guppies as an object lesson is 
that they reproduce often and in quantity. 
That's also their disadvantage. 

We installed our guppy in a large ex- 
dill-pickle vat. Then, because a mother 
guppy devours her young if they aren't 
placed in a nursery at once, we set up a 
second glass tank for the newcomers. 
Shortly afterward, we had to equip a third 
tank for middle-aged guppies. 

Before long, we had more fish than 
Marineland and, in a moment of deep-sea 
discouragement, I gave the collection to a 
group of children assembling goodies for a 
carnival. I decided that the facts of guppy 
life had been explored as extensively as 
was useful when Pat (now ten, but then 
about six) yelled one afternoon, "Hurry 
up, everybody, and come watch. This 
mama guppy is about to explode . . . 
again!" 

Next, we hit upon the garden method of 
dramatizing the growth process. Each 
child had a plot in which to plant a vege- 
table crop, or — in Mimi's case — daffodils. 
This provided a natural introduction to 
the similarity between the beginning of 
plant and human life : The need for a seed 
to be planted, the necessity for loving care 
and patience in awaiting the new life, 
and the fact of great diversity in all man- 
ner of growing things. 

We praised the youngsters' success 
lavishly, sympathized with their failures, 
and pointed out possible improvements. 
Indirect as it seems, that sort of training 
also correlates with teaching the facts of 
life. We think that, from the day of birth, 
every child must be given a sense of the 
difference between right behavior (which 
brings praise) and wrong behavior (which 
elicits correction or punishment^ 

Also, we believe in inculcating that 
"old-fashioned" virtue, family pride. We 



m l 



teach the children how to behave in pub- 
lic, warning them not to "disgrace" the 
family. We praise members of the family 
who behave well at family reunions, 
church functions and other community af- 
fairs, and the entire clan turns a dark eye 
upon anybody who gets out of line. If 
children grow up with a sense of group 
unity and an eagerness to retain the ap- 
proval of that group, temptations which — 
if responded to — would surely alienate the 
clan, cease to be attractive. 

Sometimes family pride and loyalty 
manifest themselves in unexpected ways. 
Not long ago, when I was rearranging our 
basement storage, I came across a flow- 
ered dress and a pair of ruffled panties 
Janet had worn when she was about three. 

I showed the clothing to our present 
three-year-old, Annie, saying, "Jannie wore 
this when she was your age." That settled 
it. Annie insisted on wearing the outfit as 
soon as it was washed, and she resisted 
taking it off — even to sleep. She told 
everyone, "Jannie dress and me dress." 

Just as Annie looks up to her older sis- 
ters and imitates them, the older girls try 
to set a good example for the babies. 
None of our girls has ever questioned our 
family rule that she cannot have singleton 
dates until after she is sixteen. I know 
that some people will say we're hopelessly 
out of date in our thinking, but our con- 
cern isn't for agreement with popular 
trends, but for the proper development of 
our children. 

We think that lone-couple dating before 
the age of sixteen imposes unnecessary 
burdens on youngsters, burdens more so- 
cial than moral. Boys in their early teens 
really aren't interested in girls. They'd 
rather be playing in or watching or talk- 
ing about some sports event, or devoting 
their time to some hobby. They're usually 
awkward and embarrassed in the presence 
of girls, and resentful of being forced to 
attend dancing parties . . . unless the food 
is terrific. 

However, we do believe in church group 
activity for youngsters under the age of 
sixteen. Naturally, such social functions 
are chaperoned by people we know well. 
Even then, problems come up. Not long 
ago, Janet went to a school sock hop with 
her group, then went on to a pizza palace. 
She had promised to be home by eleven- 
thirty. The pizza was slow in arriving, 
and the only public telephone nearby was 
out of order, so Janet insisted on being 
brought home. It meant that the boys had 
to pay for pizzas they weren't able to eat 
— a major catastrophe, of course. A few 
weeks later, we made it up to the boys 
(and showed our appreciation to Janet) 
by having a party for them at our house. 

Once one of our daughters has passed 
her sixteenth birthday, she is free to ac- 
cept dates with boys who have come to 
our home and met us before the first date 
takes place. This new dating plan brings 
up a fresh approach to the teaching of the 
facts of life. Bill takes over this chore. 
(Continued on next page) 



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He assumes that the youngsters, having 
grown up around a pair of demonstrative 
and deeply devoted parents, take it for 
granted that falling in love and getting 
married can be one of the most precious 
and rewarding experiences in life. 

He tells them that timing is one of the 
secrets of happiness: As the Bible says, 
"To everything there is a season, and a 
time to every purpose under the heavens; 
a time to be born, and a time to die; a 
time to plant and a time to pluck up that 
which is planted; a time to kill and a 
time to heal; a time to break down, and 
a time to build up; a time to weep, and 
a time to laugh ; a time to mourn, and a 
time to dance." 

He says, "A girl should look upon her- 
self as a precious gift to be given to her 
husband when she marries. A man brings 
to his wife the assurance that he will pro- 
vide a home for her and their children; 
he assumes the obligation of protection 
and care, and it's seldom easy. All a girl 
has to bring to her husband is herself, so 



that self should be untarnished. 

"Before marriage, she should hold her- 
self in trust; after marriage, she should 
give herself richly, fully and freely. The 
time for withholding has passed. I'll tell 
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tionate wife when the bills come pouring 
in." 

Bill is going to teach our sons the same 
idealistic code of ethics. We all know 
that parents are inclined to give a son 
more latitude than is allowed a daughter, 
but Bill says, "Just because wider free- 
dom for a boy is the general practice 
doesn't make such leniency right. It is 
as wrong for a boy to be promiscuous as 
it is for a girl. I believe in the single 
standard: Integrity for everyone." 

I think Bill sums up our facts-of-life 
philosophy when he says, "The full sweet- 
ness of love and the privilege of having 
children are two of God's greatest gifts 
to human beings. We are trying to teach 
our children to appreciate those gifts and 
to be worthy of them." 



Scars of the Hollywood Fire! 



(Continued from page 33) 
some songs for the show. A snap. The 
sky was clear blue as I stood in my 
pajamas before the window, trying to 
shake the sleep from my eyes. My home 
is built on terraced ground, making my 
view of Beverly Glen Canyon and the 
San Fernando Valley below a breathtak- 
ing one. The style of the house is Swedish 
modern with three bedrooms, a den and 
a huge living-dining room — with a beamed 
cathedral ceiling where the roof swoops 
from the high ridgepole nearly to the 
ground. 

On this morning of November 6, I had 
only lived in it a few months, but I 
wouldn't have traded it for a villa on the 
Riviera. The house had become a vital 
part of my life; it reflected all that I 
had accomplished in Hollywood. 

As I was admiring the view, my eyes 
pinpointed a long, thin streak of chalky 
smoke lazily rolling over Mulholland 
Drive, less than a quarter of a mile away. 
In addition, I became aware for the first 
time that it was extremely windy outside. 
The trees buckled under the blasts; sand 
and dirt were twirling in crazy patterns. 

I watched the smoke for a few seconds. 
Somehow, I didn't become cognizant of 
any danger. I felt snug and safe. There 
was no premonition in my thoughts. Yet 
my Yorkshire terrier, "Nui," was acting 
strange. Nui sleeps with me, and usually 
beats me out of bed. I looked around in 
disbelief, to find the dog cowering in the 
blankets. Nui wouldn't budge even when 
I left the room to have breakfast with my 
father. 

We were just finishing breakfast when 
my secretary, Howard Fox, arrived. How- 
ard mentioned the smoke, but still we 
didn't feel any cause for alarm. Instead, 



we discussed my forthcoming personal 
appearance tour for "Susan Slade." 

Suddenly, I realized that my two other 
dogs weren't in the house. I walked out- 
side on the back terrace, in my pajamas 
and robe, to find them. The wind was 
terrific ; blowing in strong, hot gusts. What 
had been a thin line of gray smoke now 
appeared in the sky as a pall of black. 
A sickening black that suddenly clouded 
the sun from view. For the first time, I 
felt uneasy. 

The dogs were whimpering by the side 
of the house. They, too — like Nui — acted 
as if they sensed danger. My father ex- 
citedly burst out the door. "I just heard 
over the radio," he yelled, "that there's a 
big fire in Stone Canyon. It's moving our 
way. We might have to evacuate." 

I couldn't believe it. I didn't want to 
believe it. Stone Canyon is just over the 
hill. The wind would move the fire our 
way. Worse yet — the entire hill in the 
back of the house was covered with a mass 
of tinder-dry brush. "Quick!" I said. "Get 
the garden hose!" 

It was fruitless. The hose was only a 
small one. The water just trickled out. 
It would take days to wet down the house 
and yard with it. And that wind-driven 
brush fire was only minutes, perhaps sec- 
onds, away. The telephone rang. The 
caller was Hugh Benson, one of my 
Warner Bros, bosses. 

I shall ever be grateful to him. He 
knew my home must be in danger. He 
knew, too, that every cent I had in the 
world was tied up in this home. He said 
he was sending help from the studio. Of- 
ficials had blocked off all canyon roads. 
But, within minutes, a studio police car 
screeched to a halt in front of my house. 
By now, flames on the ridge above were 






furiously lashing high into the smoke- 
blackened sky. 

Two studio policemen jumped out of 
the car. They dragged a large hose with 
them. They connected it to a faucet in 
the garden. The water shot out in a steady 
stream. What a wonderful sight! In a 
matter of minutes, they had the roof hosed 
down and were wetting the brush. Still 
we weren't out of danger. The fire con- 
tinued to bear down on us. Sparks were 
flying everywhere around us. Daddy and 
I used the garden hose to fight them. My 
housekeeper Jeanne (she's been in this 
country only a short time from Scotland) 
informed me that the neighbors said we 
should prepare to evacuate. 

"What should I pack?" she asked. The 
words hit me like a sledge-hammer. Until 
then, I couldn't believe that the house 
and ' my dreams might go up in smoke. 
I couldn't answer her for a few seconds. 
I was rebeling against realization. The 
realization that we were in danger. I still 
rebeled when I replied to her: "Don't 
pack a thing. If we have to leave, we'll 
go in the car and won't bother about 
anything." 

Tears came to my eyes with the words. 
I had no more time to think about it as 
I grabbed the hose and struggled higher 
up where I had seen some embers land. 
But several times Jeanne's words came 
back to me. What to save? What to save? 
Sounds a little ridiculous, but the one 
thing I thought of was my white Grecian 
dining-room table. 

"How will we ever get it in the car?" 
I kept asking myself. People, I guess react 
oddly in times of panic. I could only think 
about saving the dining-room table. My 
neighbors were busy, too. One woman I 
know of threw all her valuables into her 
=wimming pool. 

ixLeanwhile — unknown to Connie — over 
the hill in Bel-Air, the fire was out of 
control over a huge area. On one street, 
not one home was saved. Joe E. Brown's 
house of dreams went up in smoke. All 
he saved were two suits. Solly Baiano, 
talent chief at Warner Bros., lost his 
$80,000 home. Fortunately, Robert Con- 
rad — Connie's co-star in Hawaiian Eye — 
hadn't started construction of his home 
on a lot he had purchased on Mulholland 
Drive, a half-mile west. 

It was the worst fire in Southern Cali- 
fornia history. More than 450 homes 
(mostly in the $100,000 class) were either 
destroyed or badly damaged. Smoke — it 
started to mushroom like a nuclear ex- 
plosion — covered a wide area: Hollywood, 
Beverly Hills, and even downtown Los 
Angeles. In another canyon, Red Skelton 
was battling to save his place. Workmen 
from his studio rushed up fire equipment. 
They pumped water out of his swimming 
pool. Flames licked the ivy in his back- 
yard. It was touch-and-go — but they finally 
saved his home. Kim Novak received a 
call, on the set of "Boys Night Out," that 
the fire was only a block away from her 
home. She rushed there and, along with 



director Richard Quine, beat out the 
flames in her backyard. 

Blood, sweat and tears marked the bat- 
tle of man against the ravages of nature. 
There were stories of tragedies, heroisms 
and narrow escapes from violent death. 
One woman fled her burning home a 
split second before it crashed to the 
ground. A man saved himself in a burn- 
ing house by wrapping himself in wet 
blankets. Connie herself was one of the 
truly lucky ones — as she describes: 

I was still hosing down the yard when 
a miraculous thing happened. The wind 
was still angrily buffeting the terrain. The 
heat of the fire, roaring out of control 
only a few hundred yards away, was al- 
most unbearable. So was the smoke. Then 
— the wind shifted, just as we were about 
to drop the hoses and jump into the car 
and flee for our lives. 

The wind shift sent the towering inferno 
streaking along the ridge, creating a tem- 
porary haven in the neighborhood. Still, 
I fully realized that the wind could shift 
back again. So I continued with feverish 
intensity. The wind became so strong, it 
knocked me off my feet twice. Once, I 
rolled several feet, bruising my arms and 
legs. I regained my footing, and then — 
to my amazement — discovered I was still 
in my pajamas. They were soiled and 
blackened by smoke. There was no time 
for vanity. I went on working, but later 
put my car coat over the night attire. 

Optimism was high in the area when 
the wind changed direction. Previously, 
some men had grouped to plan a mass 
evacuation. I even took a breather, and 
Howard and I walked around to see if 
we could help anyone else. I can't say 
enough praise for my neighbors. You 
never know how many friends you have, 
until there's an emergency. I had lived 
in the area only a few months. Since I 
had early calls at the studio and returned 
late, I never had a chance to get acquainted 
with any of them. 

They all asked me if there was any- 
thing they could do to help, and I was 
asking them the same question. One of 
them, an attractive young woman, came 
up to me. I thought I recognized her. It 
wasn't until we started to go back to our 
homes, after talking at least twenty min- 
utes, that we introduced ourselves. She 
was Margaret O'Brien, the film actress. 
She lives around the corner. 

Back at my home, the phone wasn't 
idle for a second. There had been a rumor 
that my house had been destroyed. So 
many of my friends were both relieved 
and surprised when my father or Jeanne 
answered the phone. I had calls from 
relatives in New York. And Elvis Presley 
called from location for "Kid Galahad." 
Although his home in Bel-Air was in dan- 
ger, he was concerned about my safety. 

By now, reports over the radio (we kept 
it on full blast) were horrifying. Over- 
head, we could hear the roar of the fire- 
fighting planes spreading borate to save 
homes. 

That borate-bombing worked, too. Cliff 



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Robertson's place was surrounded by the 
fire — then a plane scored a direct hit on 
his roof with the white, chalky liquid. The 
houses on either side of Cliff's fell to ashes. 
Cliff's remained scorched but intact. Wal- 
ter W anger's former home (he recently 
sold it for $100,000) burned to the ground. 
Actor John van Dreelen lost not only his 
home but also priceless paintings from 
Holland. 

There were tense moments for Barry 
Coe, who managed to save his wife and 
baby in the nick of time. He felt sure 
his hofne was a goner. By some trick of 
fate, it was spared as flames leap-frogged 
over it. Zsa Zsa Gabor wasn't as fortu- 
nate. The chimney, that evening, was the 
only upright section in what used to be 
her $275,000 mansion. 

We could still see the flames, now mov- 
ing toward the ocean, in the afternoon. 
Howard and I walked up to Mulholland, 
which had been a blazing caldron only 
three hours before. We looked down into 
Stone Canyon. The sight was horrifying. 
I felt sickened. Only the previous day, 
this was one of the most beautiful sec- 
tions in the hills. It was now hell. 

There was a dead silence in the air. 
A nauseating silence broken only by the 
crackle (a horrendous sound) of the fire 
still burning in the canyon. Nothing but 
devastation remained on either side of 
the paved street that winds its way through 
Stone Canyon. Red-hot embers floated 
down on the ground beside us. We tried 
to stamp them out. More came. Deer, 
rabbits and other wildlife were fleeing 
around us, their little eyes crazed with 
fright. These were the fortunate animals. 
Others lay charred on the ground. 

I had to get away from the sight. Sud- 
denly, too, I felt alone. Alone in a wilder- 
ness of survival-of-the-fittest. The canyon 
of Hell below could well have been where 
I lived. "Those poor people," I said to 
Howard. "Those poor people. Losing 
everything." 

We paused for a moment, on the way 
down. Howard passed me his binoculars. 
On a ridge about two miles away, I 
focused on a beautiful home. It appeared 
untouched by the fire. As I was looking, 
flames shot over the ridge like a monster 
spouting fire. Embers ignited a rear por- 
tion of the roof. Within seconds, the home 
was afire. Probably the most pathetic 
sight I'll ever see in my life occurred next. 

A middle-aged woman rushed out of the 
burning structure, carrying a chair. I was 
too far away to hear — but from her ac- 
tions, she appeared to be in hysterics. She 
set the chair down by the fence and flung 
her arms in utter despair. She, too, was 
alone. The only things she had to show 
for a life that took many years to nurture 
in the white house on the hill, were a 
wooden chair and a cotton dress. 

A report that the wind had shifted again 
sent me back to manning the hose. I 
don't think I want to see a hose again 
for a long, long time. I was glued to it 
most of the day. While I was back on the 



hill in my yard, I kept an ear open for 
news about the fire on the radio. 

I froze when a newscaster warned: 
"Residents in Beverly Glen Canyon, be- 
ware. There's a report that the fire has 
driven snakes over the ridge and they're 
coming into the canyon." If anything 
crawls, I'm terrified of it. And snakes 
petrify me. I dashed off the hill like light- 
ning and into the house. 

We laughed about it later — but I called 
out then: "Let's get out of here. Get the 
car. Let the house be. I'm not going to 
face any snakes!" But the snake report 
proved erroneous, thank heaven, and by 
late afternoon we were out of danger. 

In other areas, the fire went unabated. 
Already, the damage was into the millions. 
Some 2,000 firefighters were on the lines. 
The state labeled the fire scene a "dis- 
aster area." Schools were evacuated. • Po- 
lice and firemen had helped evacuate 
3,000 people in the path of the flames. 
The Red Cross set up an emergency 
station. 

Winds pushed the fire toward the rich 
Pacific Palisades area. Van Williams had 
ample warning and moved everything out 
of his home to a safe area. His home was 
spared by a last-ditch stand of firefighters. 
Others were fortunate, too. Cary Grant, 
Alfred Hitchcock, Marlon Brando, Ginger 
Rogers, Robert Stack, Bobby Darin and 
Sandra Dee, Greer Garson, Robert Taylor 
— all came within a wind-shift of losing 
their homes. 

Man appeared hopelessly helpless 
against the odds. Yet, because of the effi- 
ciency of the fire crews, not one life was 
lost. Some home owners had to be removed 
from their property bodily. They refused 
to leave even in the face of death. These 
same home owners owe their lives to the 
dedicated men who fought the fire for 
three days. Monetarily, there wouldn't be 
enough gold, even in Fort Knox, to repay 
them. They would deserve much more. 
Connie is only one of many who are grate- 
ful — and who remember. 

Ironically, only last summer, another 
brush fire had swept through the Beach- 
wood area of Hollywood. One of the resi- 
dences destroyed was the first home I 
owned since coming to the movie capital. 
I loved that place, too — it held many fond 
memories. Sadly, and with reluctance, I 
visited the place after that fire. What had 
been my father's bedroom was a crumpled 
heap of burnt wood. What had been the 
living room was a tangled mass of wood 
and iron. The new owners, I was told, 
escaped with only the clothes on their 
backs. They lost everything else. 

The embers of both fires have cooled. 
Yet the memories are still vivid — espe- 
cially, that Monday last November. How 
grateful I am! How fortunate, that I 
wasn't one of the many who returned to 
ashes where the fulfillment of ambitions 
once stood. And the lucky ones, like my- 
self, will never forget that "luck" can be 
a miracle — because we, too, will bear the 
scars of memory of that day. 






The Woman Who Really Owns Sinatra 



(Continued from page 31) 
not fit into the fast-moving, neurotic world 
he seems to prefer. 

The simple truth is that, today, Frank 
Sinatra sees Nancy more regularly than 
he did through much of their marriage. 
When he is in Hollywood, he visits her 
at least twice a week. He showers her 
with gifts. On special occasions, such as 
birthdays and holidays, he is drawn to 
her like a magnet. His frequent trips out 
of town are invariably preceded and fol- 
lowed by an evening with Nancy. It has 
been said that she is "the custodian of 
whatever peace of mind he has." 

It is as though there are two men con- 
cealed within the lean frame of Frank 
Sinatra. Today, Nancy Sinatra knows only 
the better of the two. She once knew 
the other . . . intimately. 

Their marriage began with love. They 
had met in their teens, courted for more 
than four years. Frank had to defy his 
strong-willed mother (who never wanted 
him to become a singer) to marry Nancy; 
Nancy had to accept an uncertain future 
with a struggling musician whose earnings 




FIGHT 



PALSY 

JOIN THE 

MINUTE 
MARCH 



© 



barely equalled what she made as a secre- 
tary. They saw enough good in each other 
to make the sacrifices worthwhile. 

In Nancy, Frank saw a girl whose faith 
in him was almost religious. In Frank, 
Nancy saw a young man of unbelievable 
personal charm and talent. She did not 
really understand how insecure Frank 
was, how much he doubted his own worth. 
She did not know that success, when it 
came, would aggravate rather than ease 
her husband's inner torment. 

In the early days of their marriage, 
Frank's career reached such a low ebb 
that Nancy had to go hungry — even while 
she was pregnant. Frank was starved, 
too . . . but not only for food. He was 
starved for love, more love than Nancy 
or any one person could give him. He 
needed the world to love him. When, 
at last, fame burst upon him, it did not 
satisfy him. He could never forget that 
the first screaming, fainting bobby-soxers 
upon whose adoration his success had 
been built were fakes, bought and paid 
for by a clever manager. 

Now girls screamed and fainted, from 
one end of the country to the other . . . 
but did they really love him — or were they, 
as their indignant parents complained, 
merely the victims of a mass hysteria? He 



sought reassurance constantly. When the 
movies brought him to Hollywood, he be- 
gan to look for it in the arms of beautiful 
women. 

Frank threw himself into a series of 
"friendships" with other women, ranging 
from stars like Lana Turner and Marilyn 
Maxwell — whom he pursued diligently — to 
dozens of unknown starlets who pursued 
him. Hollywood had seen husbands on a 
"binge" before, but even Hollywood was 
shocked at the gusto with which Frank 
set about his peccadillos. "You'd have 
thought," one indignant observer said, 
"that he was deliberately setting out to 
rub Nancy's nose in it." 

Frank courted his "broads" conspicu- 
ously ... in restaurants, in night clubs, 
on movie sets. It was no secret that he 
had rented and furnished a lavish du- 
plex apartment in which to entertain his 
dates. Nancy's phone rang constantly; 
there are plenty of women in Hollywood 
who take pleasure in reporting a hus- 
band's escapades to his wife. 

At the beginning, in the early days, 
Nancy had not complained of hunger or 
loneliness. Now, too, she said nothing. 
She did not start to drink or to pursue 
romances of her own or to try to make 
a career for herself — the classic refuges 
of Hollywood's wounded wives. Instead, 
she tried to transform herself from a 
middle-class New Jersey girl into a woman 
worthy of her husband's exalted rank in 
the entertainment world. 

She took college courses to broaden her 
cultural background; she learned to dress 
herself in expensive, well-chosen clothes; 
she changed her hairdo to emphasize her 
best features; she acquired the know-how 
to run an expensive home and entertain 
important people. She never tried to be- 
come one of the giggling, wise-cracking, 
fast-moving flirts her husband seemed to 
prefer. Perhaps she knew she could not 
do it. Perhaps, as an admiring Holly- 
wood believed, she had too much innate 
dignity to try. 

Whatever she did, it was not enough. 
Frank's escapades grew steadily more 
frequent, more blatant, more insulting to 
his wife. One psychologist explained: "A 
man with as deep an inferiority complex 
as Sinatra's just has to keep proving to 
himself that people really love him. Sub- 
consciously, he feels that the people who 
care for him most — in Sinatra's case, his 
family, as well as his fans — only love him 
for his 'good' side — his talent, his charm, 
his popularity. But, underneath it all, 
he believes himself to be a no-good, a 
bum. He is sure that's his real self. So 
he's got to find out if people will love 
him even after they see his 'bad' side — 
if they do, he's home free. 

"But, of course, he can never find out. 
No matter how badly he behaves, he can 
always tell himself he hasn't been bad 
enough yet to make the test valid. So 
he goes on, flouting conventions, getting 



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worse and worse, until finally everyone 
does desert him, and then he tells him- 
self, / always knew it. There's nothing 
extraordinary about this behavior pattern. 
What is extraordinary is that, in Sinatra's 
case, no matter how bad he got, his wife — 
the person he hurt the most — never did 
give up on him!" 

But everyone else did. When he 
crowned his adventures with a wild ro- 
mance with Ava Gardner, traveling with 
her to Texas, Las Vegas, New York, Mex- 
ico and Spain; when he made headlines 
by punching newsmen and smashing pho- 
tographers' cameras to avoid publicity: 
when he seemed willing to subject his 
long-suffering wife and innocent children 
to every conceivable degree of humilia- 
tion in order to force Nancy to give him 
the divorce her heart and religion forbade 
— then his fans, his recording company, 
his movie studio, gave up on him entirely. 

Under the strain, his voice cracked; re- 
cording engineers who had used their 
skills to help other singers through bad 
periods just sat on their hands and let 
Sinatra struggle. His records went un- 
sold. No one wanted his services as an 
actor. One New York newspaper listed 
his name under the caption, "Things That 
No Longer Matter." Even his relationship 
with Ava Gardner foundered. They quar- 
reled so bitterly that — even after Nancy 
divorced him — his marriage to Ava had 
to be postponed at the last minute. The 
new marriage did not last long. Frank 
had at last proved his point. He had 
done his worst, and no one loved him any- 
more. 

No one but Nancy. 

Throughout that whole incredible pe- 
riod, she never said a word against him. 
On the contrary, she praised him. Asked 
for an opinion of Frank, she said, "There 
is no one as good and as kind as he." 
Asked if she would consider remarriage 
if the Church approved, she smiled sadly 
and said, "I've already had the best." 
She did not try to hide the fact that she 
was still deeply in love with the man who 
had betrayed her. 

It is this selfless love that Frank Sinatra 
has been unable to resist. 

His fans came back to him only after 
he won an Oscar for his performance in 
"From Here to Eternity." He quickly 
made new friends to replace the ones who 
had given up on him. No longer King of 
the Bobby-soxers, he established himself 
as "Leader" of a tight little group of im- 
portant and talented people — the famous 
(and infamous) Clan. He found that he 
could readily attract almost any woman 
— sophisticates like Lauren Bacall, titled 
women like Lady Adele Beatty, talented 
women like Peggy Connolly. None of 
them ever passed his acid test. 

Only Nancy. With Nancy, he could 
feel perfectly secure, knowing that he 
had done his worst and that she loved 
him still. 

And that is why, to Nancy Sinatra alone, 
Frank is able to be consistently kind and 



generous. He has showered her with gifts 
— mink coats on one birthday, diamond 
rings on another, equally expensive pres- 
ents in between. He has been just as 
lavish with praise, calling her "coura- 
geous," "wonderful," "a perfect mother." 
He has complimented her by seeking her 
comfort when he is depressed, her ap- 
plause when he is successful. Nancy had 
the satisfaction, last year in Las Vegas, of 
seeing Frank ignore the exotic Ava Gard- 
ner (who had spent an hour primping in 
the washroom of the plane that carried her 
there) simply because Nancy was also 
in town. 

Those who believed that Frank kept 
seeing Nancy only because his beloved 
children lived with her were astonished to 
find that when little Nancy, his favorite, 
married and left the house, Frank's vis- 
its did not become less frequent. Every 
time he invited his children to see him 
perform, their mother was also invited — 
an honored guest. 

And even though Frank Sinatra knows 
how to spend the money he earns, he has 
never quibbled about the tremendous 
amount the court awarded Nancy in ali- 
mony. By law, she receives a full third 
of everything he makes. At the time of 
the divorce settlement, Frank Sinatra's in- 
come was far less than it is today . . . 
yet he has never shown the slightest in- 
terest in having Nancy's share of it de- 
creased. To date, Nancy has collected 
well over two million dollars. Since she 
will continue to collect until she remarries, 
there is a great deal more to come. 

There is no doubt that Nancy Sinatra 
"owns" Frank today . . . owns him finan- 
cially, owns him emotionally. She is the 
custodian of his peace of mind. She is 
full owner of his past — part owner of his 
present. One of Hollywood's favorite 
guessing games is whether she will be 
offered his future as well. 

Many think she will. One close friend 
says: "Nancy has never given up hope of 
getting Frank back. She turns down more 
dates than any woman her age in town. 
The few times she's got involved with a 
man, she's stopped short of marriage. If 
Frank came back to her, the Church would 
approve, their kids would approve, the 
whole world would approve. I think 
Nancy sees Frank as a big boy who started 
sowing his wild oats later than usual and 
who has taken longer than most. When 
he's done, he'll come home and she'll be 
waiting for him." 

One of Frank's cronies agrees. "Frank 
could have got married half a dozen times 
in the past couple of years. And he came 
close, too, particularly with Bacall. But, 
each time, he broke it off with some flimsy 
excuse — or with no excuse at all. I think 
he knows that someday he's going to go 
back to Nancy, and he doesn't want to 
have to go through a third divorce to do 
it. It's just a matter of time." 

But others see it differently. They re- 
call the most perceptive statement ever 
made about Frank : "What he really wants 



out of life is to be married to Nancy — 
with no questions asked." To all intents 
and purposes, they say, that is exactly the 
situation that prevails. Frank can turn 
to Nancy whenever he needs her — and 
still lead his late-hours life, keep his free- 
dom, date his "broads." . . . 

The present situation is ideal — not only 
for Frank — but for Nancy, as well. "Peo- 
ple think," these others point out, "that 
Nancy divorced Frank because she simply 
couldn't take any more of his shenani- 
gans with Ava Gardner. That's not true. 
Nancy could have taken anything, as long 
as she could hold on to Frank and have 
hope that he'd come back to her. She 
only gave him up because she saw, long 
before he did, that it wasn't herself he 
was destroying, but himself. Married to 
her, Frank's romance with Ava was an 
international scandal; it was ruining him. 
If she divorced him, he could do what he 
liked without ruining his reputation. So 



she gave him his freedom, for his sake, 
not her own. 

"It turned out to be too late. I think 
she knows Frank still hasn't grown up 
enough to settle for one woman . . . even 
a woman he cares for as much as he cares 
for Nancy. He's still eaten away by the 
need to prove himself — and it usually 
takes quite a few dames to help a man do 
that. I don't think Nancy wants to put 
him in a position where his dates become 
scandal material again. I think it'll be a 
long, long time before she marries him 
again ... if she ever does. 

"After all, why should she? The Frank 
Sinatra Nancy loves . . . the one she re- 
members from when he was a wide-eyed 
kid with a ukulele and a lot of ambi- 
tion . . . that's the only one he shows her 
now. The way things are now, she already 
owns his good side — lock, stock and bar- 
rel. Let the rest of the world have what's 
left!" 



Dolores Hawkins' Own Story 



(Continued from page 27) 
Dolores Hawkins herself. Dolores's reac- 
tion was as strong and definite as the 
column item itself had been. "Ridicu- 
lous!" she said. "I don't have any diffi- 
culty in finding men who want to marry 
me. I don't know why columnists always 
do this." 

After Dolores had simmered down, we 
were able to get the complete, unvarnished 
truth from her about her relationship with 
Gardner McKay. 

It was six years ago that Dolores Haw- 
kins first laid eyes on Gardner McKay. 
She'd been modeling for about a year when 
she got a call to pose for famed glamour 
photographer Richard Avedon. When she 
stepped out in front of the camera, she 
noticed that there were three male mod- 
els standing behind her to provide back- 
ground effect for the scene. 

One was definitely not a "background" 
kind of fellow. She stared at him, forget- 
ting for a moment where she was, and 
definitely liked what she saw. He was tall 
— six-foot-five, at least — so tall that he had 
to scrounge his head down a little into his 
neck to miss hitting the overhead studio 
lights. His hair was brown, his jaw was 
strong, his lips were tight-pressed and 
sensitive. 

But it was his eyes which made her 
draw in her breath sharply. Large deep- 
set eyes. The tenderest yet most hypnotic 
eyes she had ever seen. 

Gardner McKay stared back, and he 
liked what he saw, too. A slim, trim fig- 
ure that fused upward into a long, beau- 
tiful neck. And, above this, an amazing 
face. Chiseled features he immediately 
wanted to reproduce in sculpture. A mar- 
velous, tremulous mouth. A pert, crinkly 
nose. And eyes — how to describe them? 
They were . . . they were simply tre- 
mendous. 

The voice of photographer Avedon 



broke in upon them, firmly but with the 
hint of a laugh in it: "All right, Miss 
Hawkins, whenever you're ready!" 

That was the beginning. 

When they met later, Dolores responded 
to something else about Gardner McKay — 
his voice. Not just the deep, manly qual- 
ity she heard when he spoke, but the 
things he said, too, and the enthusiasm 
with which he said them. 

He found meaning and excitement in so 
many things. He was a model and a pho- 
tographer and a sculptor and a painter, 
he told her. Life was fun, a constant 
adventure, and he was discovering beauty 
everywhere. 

Looking back at the time of their first 
meeting — and the period immediately fol- 
lowing — Dolores says, "I remember him 
as being a terribly nice, refined boy. He 
has never changed. He's intellectual and 
very sensitive." 

The years rolled by. Dolores became 
America's most photographed model, a 
$60-an-hour, $60,000-a-year cover girl, and 
Gardner was discovered by Hollywood and 
handed the starring role of skipper Adam 
Troy in the hour-long weekly series, Ad- 
ventures In Paradise (now seen Sunday 
nights, over ABC-TV). 

But the pattern of their personal ro- 
mance ran far less smoothly. 

"I dated him a few times in New York 
when we first met, and then we didn't see 
each other for a while," Dolores says. 
"The reason: I became engaged to some- 
one else. No, I won't tell you his name." 

But the engagement didn't stick and 
soon Dolores started dating Gardner — 
and other fellows, too — again. "That's 
what so many people don't understand," 
she says. "Sure, I go out with Gardner, 
but I date other boys, as well. And he, 
of course, runs around with other girls 
when not with me." 

He certainly has dated other girls — 



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Maria Cooper, Barrie Chase, Linda Hutch- 
ins, Suzanne Pleshette, Joan Collins and 
Greta Chi, to mention just a few. But, 
somehow or other, the magnetic attrac- 
tion they both experienced that first day 
they saw each other always seems to 
work its old magic, and Gardner and 
Dolores manage to get back together 
again. 

It was during the time of his recent 
paternity trial, when Gardner was ac- 
cused of being the father of Mrs. Patrice 
Frantz's daughter, eighteen-month-old Ga- 
brielle, that the off-again, on-again ro- 
mance between Dolores and Gardner met 
its most severe crisis. 

"I told Dolores about it before it broke," 
Gardner says. "I wanted her to hear about 
the paternity suit from me, not from the 
papers. I told her the truth. I was ter- 
ribly worried about the effect it would 
have on our relationship. She was in New 
York at the time. I'd call her frequently. 
But being three thousand miles apart 
made it hard. 

"I had misgivings about how long her 
loyalty would stand up when she was faced 
with comments from all kinds of people — 
people at work, people she met socially, 
people who believe what they read and 
might try to make her believe it, too. I 
wondered how durable her faith could be 
in the wake of rumors. ... I had faith 
in her, but I know the power of gossip. . . . 
I know it's wiped out more people and 
more happy relationships. ... I didn't 
want that to happen to us." 

The trial, in Gardner's words, "was 
hell" — until that wonderful moment when 
the jury filed in and the foreman deliv- 
ered the verdict: "We find Gardner Mc- 
Kay not to be the father of Gabrielle 
Frantz." 

Gardner was overjoyed, and he wanted 
to break the good news to Dolores imme- 
diately. "The first thing I did when I 
got home was to place a call to her in 
New York," he says. "Then I thought I'd 
celebrate by taking a bath. The call got 
through to her while I was in the tub. 
I told her the news ; she was delighted . . . 
delighted. . . . All my conversations with 
her had meant a great deal to me. They'd 
kept me going. She had loyalty . . . great 
loyalty." 

Dolores flew out to Hollywood to be 
by his side. This was her demonstration 
to the world — her answer to everyone who 
had sniped and kicked at Gardner when 
he was down — that she'd believed in him 
before and still believed in him now. 

They went dancing at the Beverly 
Hilton's Star on the Roof. They went 
driving up into the Hollywood hills, ac- 
companied by Gardner's shaggy dog, 
"Pussycat." They went sailing, took in a 
few movies, ate dinner at swanky res- 
taurants, grabbed snacks at drive-ins. It 
was exciting. It was lots of fun. 

And then the columnists started writing 
drivel about them again. 

"It makes me so angry," Dolores says. 
"One of the columnists wrote that I was 



commuting by plane every weekend to be 
in California with Gardner. They accused 
us of having big fights. I asked Gardner, 
'Can't you do something about the ru- 
mors?' I often reproach him about them, 
but he just shrugs and says he can't do 
anything." 

It's not only the untruths that colum- 
nists print about Gardner and herself that 
bug Dolores. It's also the rumors they 
spread that she's trying to "use" him to 
get publicity. 

"Magazines are constantly wanting to 
do picture stories of the two of us. I 
don't want to do it," she says. "I know 
the few times my name appears in print, 
it is in connection with Gardner McKay. 
I hate for people to think I'm trying to 
cash in on his name. I don't need any 
publicity, and don't want any. I make as 
much money as Gardner does without hav- 
ing to worry about getting my name in the 
paper ! 

"Don't forget. I've had screen tests 
before Gardner McKay ever came to Hol- 
lywood. I worked very hard to build my 
career. I didn't have to be associated with 
any actor to get where I am today. I don't 
want to be known as Gardner McKay's 
girlfriend. I can continue to make it on 
my own." 

Dates on the West Coast, dates on the 
East Coast, six years of close friendship, 
a relationship that has survived scandal 
and rumors and gossip — so the question 
is: Does Dolores Hawkins want to get 
married? 

Dolores says, "Sure, I'd like to get mar- 
ried. All girls want to get married and 
have children." 

So far, so good. 

But now the $64 question : When are 
you going to marry Gardner McKay? 

Xhe answer, a blockbuster: "I've al- 
ways considered Gardner a marvelous, 
sweet boy, but we've never been anything 
but good friends," says Dolores. "Our 
relationship is strictly platonic, and there 
isn't a chance in the world that I'll marry 
him!" 

"Not a chance in the world?" 

"I refuse to marry Gardner McKay for 
a very simple reason," she replies sweetly. 
"1 don't love him." 

, "But what about Gardner? What 
about — " 

Dolores interrupts and answers our 
question before we even finish it: "And 
what's more, Gardner doesn't love me!" 

That does it. End of an interview. 
Never argue with a woman, especially one 
who genuinely seems to believe that what 
she says is really what she feels. 

But there's something else to be consid- 
ered. Something that her words or his 
ivords cannot wipe away. A magical elec- 
tricity that sparked between them the first 
time they met, and which flares up again 
each time they get together. 

Gardner McKay may be foolish to try 
to pooh-pooh a reaction like that. 

And Dolores Hawkins, like any woman, 
can always change her mind. 



"I See You With My Heart" 



(Continued from page 40) 
The "thing" was dope. That same after- 
noon, the two arresting officers had en- 
tered the hotel room where Charles was 
resting between concerts. Charles was 
alone, but Sgt. Owen said that he found 
thirteen capsules which had contained 
heroin, a jar with three-quarters of a pound 
of marijuana, a hypodermic needle, an 
eye dropper and a burner. 

The story broke in headlines in many 
newspapers. But, for those in the know, 
this was not an isolated case . . . not re- 
stricted to the Negro or the contemporary 
musician. Behind the beat, whether it be 
Dixie or rock 'n' roll, the music business 
is fiercely competitive and sometimes de- 
structive. One of the early jazz greats, Bix 
Beiderbecke. died at twenty-eight of pneu- 
monia — but the real killer had been acute 
alcoholism. While Billie Holliday lay dy- 
ing in a New York hospital, police were 
waiting to arrest her on a narcotics charge 
— and not for the first time. And there have 
been many other great jazz men charged 
with the use of heroin . . . among them. 
Charlie Parker, Stan Getz, Gene Krupa. 

Not all the papers headlined the Ray 
Charles story. Some passed it over or 
buried it deep inside their editions. There 
seemed to be some uncertainty among them 
as to the importance of Ray Charles. But 
there is no uncertainty among musicians 
and millions of record buyers. Ray Charles, 
although only thirty-one, has been in- 
spiring other singers, literally setting the 
style in the music market. 

His single records are always best- 
sellers, usually the top hits. His albums 
are always among the most wanted. Holly- 
wood has come to him with sheaves of 
thousand-dollar bills to record movie 
themes. Abroad, he is revered and The 
New York Times correspondent reported 
Charles to be the most popular recording 
artist in France. 

It is doubtful that any of this crossed his 
mind while he waited in the police station 
at Indianapolis. Sgt. Owen reported that 
Charles had broken down emotionally, but 
the detective indicated that Charles had 
not been a casual user of narcotics. Ower 
described Ray's needle-pricked arm as 
"one of the worst I've ever seen." He 
said that Charles had admitted using drugs 
since the age of fifteen. 

It was at that age Ray Charles went to 
work as a musician. He had told me about 
that, just ten days before the arrest, when 
we met for an interview in New York. 
I have been thinking of that interview, 
wondering if somewhere in his story there 
is the answer to a man's need of drugs. . . . 

Charles was close to an hour late for 
the meeting. I waited with Milt Shaw, 
president of Shaw Artists Corporation and 
booking agent for Ray. Shaw impressed 
me with the importance of the singer. He 
told me that Ray had been paid $25,000 for 
four hours of recording at 20th Century- 



Fox. That Ray was booked on a college 
concert schedule with a #>5,000-a-night 
guarantee. And then Shaw said, "I'll tell 
you something about Ray. He's generous 
and nice. Now they're all nice when they're 
starting out, but when they get big" — and 
he shrugged. "Well, Ray is still the same 
nice guy." 

He talked about Ray's family and noted 
that Delia, Ray's wife, wasn't blind. "They 
met in Texas, Ray will tell you the story. 
He likes to talk for himself." That led 
Shaw to another observation: "Ray is in- 
dependent. He runs the orchestra himself. 
He knows the sound he wants and, if 
there's a bad note, he knows instantly who 
played it. He does much of his own ar- 
ranging. He supervises his own taping at 
a recording session. And I mean right 
down to the placing of the microphones. 
He can split a beat on tape with the best 
audio engineer in the business." 

And then Charles came in, a man of 
medium height with strong, regular fea- 
tures, dressed conservatively, and wearing 
the dark glasses. Following the edge of 
the desk, he guided himself to me and 
shook hands. There was a call to be an- 
swered. One hand groped for the telephone 
— but, once there, his fingers moved quick- 
ly and with dexterity. Then he sat down 
behind the desk. "You want to ask some 
questions," he said, and smiled. 

We started at the beginning, and it was 
a story of a man who has overcome seem- 
ingly impossible handicaps. Ray Charles 
was born in Albany, Georgia, September 
23, 1930. When Ray was six months old, 
his father, a carpenter, moved the family 
of three to Greensfield, Florida. "It was a 
town no bigger than this room. I guess." 

Asked about the handicap of being 
blind, he said, "Let's look at it right. If 
you lost your sight as an adult, you would 
be a total wreck. But I grew up blind and 
learned to live with it." 

As a young child, Ray's vision was nor- 
mal. At the age of six. he came down with 
mumps or measles — he doesn't remember 
exactly what it was. But, for lack of proper 
medical attention, complications set in . . . 
and suddenly, for the six-year-old, the 
world was all darkness. 

His parents put him into a school for 
the blind at St. Augustine and that was 
where his musical education began. He 
learned piano and saxophone. It wasn't 
easy. Music was written in braille. He 
would memorize the score, then go back to 
the instrument and learn to play -it. 

"I guess I ought to tell you what it was 
like at home then." he said. "The neighbors 
would all scold my mother because of the 
way she treated me. She was kind of 
scorned for the things she made a blind 
boy do." She made him wash clothes, 
scrub, make up beds, iron, even cook. 

"Anything that was normal to do, she 
put me to do," he explained. "She would 
tell the neighbors. 'One of these days, I 
won't be with him to help him.' She would 




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tell me, 'You lost your sight, son, but you 
haven't lost your mind.' She taught me 
independence. She didn't let me pity my- 
self." 

At school, he got a solid foundation in 
music. The accent was on classical compo- 
sitions, but Ray listened to popular music 
on radio. "Sometimes I would put aside 
my lessons and play for my comfort, my 
own joy. I'd put the braille aside and try 
some boogie-woogie or something I'd heard 
Nat Cole do." 

With this natural love of music came 
the desire to be a musician. It made sense 
to Ray, but not to others. "The kids called 
me 'Roc' for my initials. They would say. 
'Roc, you're supposed to learn to make 
brooms, mops and chairs. You can't sing 
and play the piano. Why don't you just 
make up your mind to do what other blind 
kids do?'" 

Ray recalled, "I would go off and cry, 
but I came back more determined than 
ever. Partly because of my mother. I 
trusted her. She kept telling me that, if 
you had a strong enough belief, you could 
accomplish anything." 

At fifteen, Ray Charles lost his mother 
and then, within the same year, his father. 
He was alone, with no relatives. "I went 
out looking for work as a musician. The 
first band I got into, there was a regular 
pianist but they would let me sit in near 
the end of the night." 

He worked when he could as a pianist 
or saxophonist. "Of course, no one had 
braille arrangements. I would get one of 
the guys to read off the music and I would 
write it down in braille, then go back to 
my room and memorize it. It was a lot of 
work, but it strengthened my memory, 
taught me to remember." 

Living wasn't easy. He got seven or 
eight dollars a night — and it was a "helluva 
good week" if he worked two nights. "The 
strange thing is that people can learn to 
live with less. When I had parents, there 
was all I wanted to eat. But I learned that 
man can go from day to day on a can of 
sardines and a few crackers. You just have 
to remember to save that can until you 
really need it." 

He began to be recognized as a good 
musician . . . but somewhere in that early 
period — at fifteen, according to the state- 
ment given out by the Indianapolis police 
— Charles had his first taste of heroin. 

At that age, a boy is still a child and 
most fifteen-year-olds live in a home, en- 
joying the security of the family, being 
helped and prepared for adult life. Had 
anyone warned him about drugs? It seems 
unlikely- when, even today, few schools 
educate youngsters about the dangers. 

The first exposure to narcotics could 
be very innocent. A fellow musician says, 
"Roc, smoke this. It'll make you play 
better." Could a fifteen-year-old say no 
when he didn't know about "the hook"— 
the habit — possibly even had no idea of 
what he was taking? 

At seventeen, Ray decided to do some- 
thing on his own and organized his first 
trio. "I admired Charles Brown and Nat 



Cole. I imitated them. We began to travel 
and got as far as Seattle, Washington." 
There they won a job on a television sta- 
tion, and the trio was the first Negro act 
to be sponsored in the Northwest. 

But then Ray began to have mixed feel- 
ings about his music. He wanted to develop 
a style of his own and he gave it much 
thought. "It seemed to me a person must 
play from deep within himself. You do 
that, and you don't have to worry about 
originality — because then you are doing 
what no Bther man can do, and that is be- 
ing yourself. They call my music 'soulful' 
and that's what I think it is. I sing from 
the soul." 

Many music critics have spoken of the 
spiritual feeling in his style. Some have 
written that he got his early training in 
spirituals. "That's not at all true," he told 
me. "I never sang in choirs. I didn't have 
time. I was too busy trying to make a 
dollar to eat. But I'm basically a very 
religious man and love gospel music and, 
if you love something, it's bound to rub 
off." 

His wife Delia was singing in a gospel 
group in Houston, Texas, when he met her. 
He speaks of her and his family with feel- 
ing. Their home is in Los Angeles and he 
has three sons, the eldest six years. "I've 
got very definite ideas on how children 
should be raised," he said. "I'm of the old 
school and believe they should at all times 
be respectful. But, most important, I be- 
lieve the best thing for kids is their parents. 
We have no maid to help out with the boys, 
although Delia might get a baby-sitter 
once in a while. She never goes on the 
road with me, for I think no outsider — not 
even an aunt or grandmother — can take 
the place of a parent." 

His blindness hasn't bothered his rela- 
tionship with his kids. "They like to go 
to the beach or have a picnic. I like that, 
too." His hobby at home is working with 
his intricate audio equipment and he 
handles all the complicated switches and 
knobs and buttons himself. And he listens 
to music, all kinds. "I love to hear certain 
operas, and I'm only sorry that they aren't 
in English so that I could get fuller en- 
joyment from them." 

He has had memorable experiences. The 
first night he played in Carnegie Hall, he 
brought down the house. He got a sensa- 
tional welcome at the Hollywood Palladium 
recently. He remembers Paris with love. 
"It was almost too much in France. We 
were scheduled to do only four concerts, 
but so many turned out that we had to do 
two more." 

He talked about what his career is like 
these days, behind the ovations and hur- 
rahs. "It never gets easier. It's a struggle 
when you're trying to get to the top. and 
with me it wasn't overnight. It was step 
by step, all the way. And when you get 
up there, you've got to work even harder 
to maintain the position. There's always 
someone else trying to knock you over. I 
don't regret that part of it. There's always 
room for improvement in a man. Com- 
petition keeps a man from getting lazy." 



Ray has refused to compromise the inner 
feeling about what his music should be. 
Recently, a movie company gave him a 
song and offered him $15,000 to record it 
on a movie track. Ray took the song home 
— and, the next day, returned the music 
with his apologies. "I'll tell you what hap- 
pened. I worked on that song all night. I 
tried it every different way — as blues, a 
tango, a waltz, everything — but I couldn't 
get any feeling out of it. And, believe me, 
it didn't make me happy to turn down 
fifteen grand! I'm just not in the position 
to turn down that kind of money." 

He has a reputation for demanding the 
best from his band — in fact, of being tough; 
though his sidemen, without exception, are 
loyal. Yet, away from the bandstand, he 
is soft-spoken. At no time during our in- 
terview was there the slightest trace of 
self-pity when he spoke of handicaps and 
hardships. Evident was the dignity in- 
stilled by his mother . . . pride in music 
. . . purposeful integrity. There was no 
sign of weakness in the man. 

So how do you account for narcotics 
in Ray Charles's life? The use of drugs 
becomes a habit and, as we know, one of 
the most difficult to shake. The beginning 
came to Ray when he was fifteen, an 
orphan, his only hope in life being him- 
self. He was dependent on those around 
him, the men with eyes who had to put up 



with him while he learned. It could be 
that simple. 

Many musicians felt deeply for Ray 
when the Indianapolis arrest became news. 
Many, many musicians — many of the very 
best — have never been dope addicts. They 
were pained, not only for Ray, but be- 
cause his arrest perpetuates the myth that 
drug addiction is an occupational disease 
in the music business, although statistics 
show otherwise. Government reports indi- 
cate that the largest users are juveniles, 
followed by doctors, nurses, criminals, and 
even housewives. As a group, musicians 
are tenth or eleventh.. 

These figures give Ray Charles little 
comfort. At press time, he was released 
in the Indianapolis municipal court on 
$1,250 bail. The charge of being a com- 
mon drug addict was dropped, but hearing 
was set for January 4, 1962, on possession 
of narcotics and possession of narcotic 
equipment. If convicted, he could get up 
to fifteen years in prison. 

Regardless of the outcome of the trial, 
Ray Charles, who has overcome blindness 
and poverty, has yet to overcome the big- 
gest problem of his life. The destructive 
effects of narcotics on the individual are 
without parallel. As he himself has said, 
he sings from the soul ... he sees with 
his heart . . . and the pain his body has 
already known has only just begun. . . . 



The Most Sinister Villain of All 






(Continued from page 48) 
most nefarious Gold Dust Twins . . . suave 
despite his obesity, Greenstreet dispensed 
death by the slowest and most painful 
means . . . and if you saw Lorre holding 
his girl's hand, you could be pretty well 
sure that the rest of her was at home — ■ 
probably in the oven. 

Each of these estimable cutthroats was, 
at one time or another, called "the man 
you love to hate." But all of them are 
simply mischievous boys, compared with 
Bruce Gordon as the infamous Frank 
Nitti on ABC-TV's The Untouchablesl As 
"the enforcer" of the Capone era, Nitti 
wears a frightening scowl, a tight double- 
breasted striped suit, and a well-deserved 
reputation for sadism. His various busi- 
ness interests involve dope trafficking, 
bootleg whiskey, the proprietorship of 
speakeasies and bawdy houses. 

When he clumps toward his chair at 
the head of the conference table, his con- 
federates in mayhem are apt to rise in- 
stinctively. "Let's keep on the good side 
of him," they motion to each other fur- 
tively. "If he didn't enjoy his breakfast 
this morning, who knows which one of us 
is liable to be taken suddenly killed?" 

Gordon-Nitti's stock in trade — and no 
other current heel can come close to ap- 
proximating it— is The Threat. Using 
little more than an ominous frown and a 
rumbling voice he threatens better than any 
screen blackguard of the past or present. 



After all, Al Capone wouldn't pick just 
anyone to serve as ace lieutenant. As a 
result, he is the meanest man ever to cross 
the television screen. 

So effective is Gordon's interpretation 
of unbridled nastiness that a large chunk 
of the viewing public sees him as Nitti 
and assumes that Nitti is Gordon. An 
appreciable amount of his fan mail proves 
it, and those letters run from blasts to 
blessings. 

There is the group which excoriates 
him for not keeping better company ("Al- 
though you do or order ruthless things, 
I can tell that your heart's not in it. I'm 
sure it's all the result of an unhappy child- 
hood, but let me assure you, as one who 
knows, that it's never too late to change. 
Rid yourself of your unsavory friends, 
choose wholesome companions, and the 
future will take care of itself."). 

There is the lunatic fringe which ap- 
plauds his nine-to-five brutality ("You 
don't take no lip from nobody") and 
wants to learn how to become more like 
"him." And then there are the out-and- 
out mash notes — which bewilder Bruce 
Gordon most. "Every once in a while," 
he says, "I receive letters from women 
who are obviously demented. They refer 
to the way I holler and handle myself in 
situations, and they end up with some- 
thing idiotic, like T could go for you.' 
Fortunately, my wife is good-natured!" 
(Continued on next page) 




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It may come as a shattering blow, to 
at least some of these correspondents, to 
learn that Bruce Gordon himself is about 
as savage as Heidi. He used to sing in 
church choirs, has never laid a glove on 
his family, and devotes a lot of his free 
time to caring for and feeding the birds 
and animals his elder son insists on bring- 
ing home. 

"I'm appalled, though I suppose I 
shouldn't be too surprised, that the lay- 
man finds it hard to differentiate between 
the actor and the part he plays," says this 
extremely genial six-footer. "I'm not talk- 
ing about the times I go shopping at the 
market and the guys raise their hands 
and gag it up with things like, 'All right, 
Nitti, don't shoot!' That's to be expected 
and I appreciate the recognition, naturally. 

"What never fails to startle me, though, 
are the questions by people I'm not con- 
vinced are altogether kidding. They'll 
ask, 'How does it feel to handle a tommy- 
gun?' Now that's unanswerable, of course. 
I shouldn't let it bother me. I guess ac- 
tors have faced that since there've been 
actors." 

The 185-pound, hazel-eyed, dark-com- 
plexioned Gordon is — despite those al- 
most apoplectic fits which Netti pitches 
on TV — a veteran performer bothered by 
almost nothing. A bricklayer's son, he was 
born forty years ago in Fitchburg, Massa- 
chusetts, the second of .three sons. In 
search of jobs during the most critical 
years of the Depression, their father moved 
them and their mother to New Jersey and 
eventually to Brooklyn, where Bruce grew 
up. 

"We were poor," he recalls, "but then 
everyone was poor. The difference be- 
tween us and some others was that we had 
all the fun there was to be found, and 
we never let our spirits sag." 

Bruce announced early that he wanted 
to develop into an opera singer — a deci- 
sion which infuriated his father perhaps as 
much is it will perplex those fans who 
view their Gordon-Nitti as a faultlessly 
manicured gorilla. The Gordons were 
working people, and a son who wanted 
to enter show business was almost as 
shameful as one who wanted to join 
Capone's mob. Absolutely no, warned 
Gordon Senior. 

"It was my mother who encouraged me," 
Bruce confides. "Once I had the bee in 
my bonnet, it stayed there. I sang in glee 
clubs and church choirs, usually on week- 
ends while I was in high school. Was I a 
good singer? Well, let's say I wasn't on 
my way towards greatness. I knew when 
to quit. But, by then, I had both feet in 
show business, and I gravitated toward the 
theater." 

The theater, in the middle 1930s, 
wasn't wringing its hands desperately for 
inexperienced actors. Gordon considered 
himself lucky to land a job as an usher 
at the legendary Palace Theater in Man- 
hattan. Incorrigibly optimistic, he was 
positive the breaks would come by an 
amalgam of ambition, boundless energy, 



and an ability to be at the right place at 
the right time. 

When he wasn't at work, he read inces- 
santly, taught himself to be indifferent to 
anything he couldn't afford — including 
food — and made the casting office rounds 
with another impoverished hopeful. Eddie 
Albert. Through the Palace's chief usher- 
ette, he met her brother, still another hun- 
gry and unemployed actor named Barry 
Sullivan. It could hardly have occurred to 
any of these three young men that their 
reaching stardom was only a short matter 
of time. 

Gordon finally made his debut in the 
legitimate theater in no less than a Max 
Reinhardt play. "It was called 'The Eter- 
nal Road,' and I was one of one hundred 
extras. We had eight or nine complete 
changes of body makeup during every 
performance. For all that, we earned a 
munificent $14.85 a week. And we had a 
ball." 

Eventually, he was given speaking parts 
in considerably less populated plays in 
New York — until the outbreak of World 
War II. "After I was shoved out into the 
cruel world by the Navy," he remembers, 
grinning, "I was fastidiously unemployed, 
but I was back in Manhattan. At about 
that time, I met Jane Farrar, a marvelous 
singer and actress who'd just returned to 
town from Hollywood. She'd had an ex- 
tensive musical education, subsequent to 
drama study at Northwestern and the 
Goodman Theater in Chicago. She 
bought the lunches." 

And she married Bruce Gordon. "Now," 
he adds, "I buy breakfasts, lunches and 
dinners — not to mention a few other odds 
and ends." 

Except for his Navy hitch. Bruce worked 
steadily on the stage from 1937 to 1954, 
happily sandwiching Shakespeare in be- 
tween appearing opposite Helen Hayes 
and Katharine Cornell. Soon known as a 
"pro" — a versatile actor who is a quick 
study, can take direction easily, and can 
always be guaranteed to give more than is 
expected of him — he was a natural for 
television and became its busiest actor. (In 
his hundreds of roles on TV dramatic 
shows prior to The Untouchables, he's 
been everything from an apologetic milk- 
toast to a literate and sensitive lover.) 

It was while Bruce was acting in a 
coast-to-coast series called Men Of Prey, 
filmed in New York, that he came to the 
attention of the Hollywood caliphs. A 
long-distance call asked him if he'd like 
to try California: "That was just about 
when live television was on its last legs in 
the East. The offer was good, and I fig- 
ured I didn't have much to lose, so I said 
'Sure.' " 

In Hollywood, there were a few movies 
— "The Buccaneer," among them — and a 
fresh batch of TV jobs. ("I was the gen- 
tlest soul on earth in Have Gun — Will 
Travel and Hotel De Paree, and on the 
Jane Wyman Theater and plenty more.") 

Then, less than three years ago. Desilu 
Productions decided to film a two-part 



drama about Eliot Ness, a U.S. federal 
agent who was actively instrumental in 
bringing the late and unlamented Al Ca- 
pone to justice. Desi Arnaz chose the 
title, The Untouchables, and hired Robert 
Stack to portray Ness. To play Frank 
Nitti — the most mercenary of Capone 
henchmen — he selected New York actor 
Bruce Gordon. The two-parter was pro- 
duced on TV. received a good audience 
response and excellent critical notices, and 
sold its product. That seemed to be that. 

But there was an abrupt eruption. 
Weeks after The Untouchables was sup- 
posed to be laid to rest, there was still a 
clamor for it. The Untouchables had been, 
according to every known poll, the most 
carefully watched two-parter of the sea- 
son. The mandarins got together in ex- 
ecutive session and it was agreed that the 
show might well be sold as a season's 
package. And into the package went Bruce 
Gordon, who had scared the tar out of 
viewers as Frank Nitti, the bootleg era's 
most violent emissary of evil. 

The Untouchables is now in its third 
season on ABC-TV. Last year, most Amer- 
ican newspapers reported the same basic 
item : "John Kennedy. Dwight Eisenhower, 
and Harry Truman have one thing in com- 




HOPE ^7 st ^ CHEST 

National Multiple Sclerosis Society 



mon. They all reserve Thursday evenings 
for The Untouchables." They — along with 
millions of others. 

Like every other actor who takes his 
work seriously. Gordon has normal qualms 
about being associated with a single part, 
no matter how meaty and rewarding. "Call 
it a paradox." he states. "Nitti was an 
out-and-out bum who died an ignoble 
death. He was a scurvy character with 
absolutely no redeeming features — yet he's 
been instrumental in furthering my career. 
It's a paradox I find hard to reconcile. 
But. with the mixed blessings, I'm not 
complaining." 

Aware that the series eventually will 
end, Bruce is doing his best to seek out 
something new. preferably in the theater. 
He strongly believes that an actor should 
return to the stage often, if only for a 
refresher. A play, which will meet a live 
audience, can bask in three or four weeks 
of carefully, leisurely rehearsal. A televi- 
sion show such as The Untouchables re- 
quires roughly sixty-five hours a week for 
both preparation and shooting. "It's im- 
possible," Bruce contends, "to get a part 
suitably organized in any depth, in three 
to five days." 



In the meantime he is. by his own ad- 
mission, a happy man. The Gordons live 
in Northridge, California, with their two 
boys. "Vincent," he says proudly, "is 
thirteen. He wants to go off alone into 
the Matto Grosso and study insect life 
and mammalia. The way the world is 
going, I hope he makes it. Brian, who's 
eight, wants to blast off for the moon and 
beyond. The way the world is going, I 
hope he makes it!" 

Their house is built in the French pro- 
vincial farm-house style which, as he 
grins, "in Southern California can mean 
just about anything and usually does. The 
interior was beautifully done in Early 
American by my wife. I'm not being 
careful when I say that. It really is." 

Away from the studio. Bruce likes to 
stay close to home. Asked his outside in- 
terests, he reports, " 'Outside' is very 
well put. I spend all my free time out- 
side, filling up dog holes and replacing 
fence boards they knocked loose. We 
have three French poodles, one Labrador 
retriever who wandered in about two years 
ago and won't go near the pool, and one 
Great Dane puppy who weighs in now at 
160 pounds. He's very ferocious looking, 
but he spends all his free time smelling 
flowers. 

"My other job is to feed and take care 
of the various small animal and bird life 
Vince is interested in. while he's at school. 
Right now, there's one broken-winged 
crow — his name is 'Quincy T. Blackbird' 
— and one ground squirrel and one rat 
that live in the same cage. Most recently, 
we've acquired a baby gray squirrel Vince 
found at the bottom of a tree. After a 
month of warm milk and Pablum, it's get- 
ting fat and sassy." 

As the most striking exemplar of TV 
violence and as the father of two growing 
sons who doubtless are as impressionable 
as all other youngsters. Gordon is not 
unconscious of the fact that the show on 
which he appears has come in for its share 
of criticism. He and Jane are strict par- 
ents — they won't permit Brian to view it — 
and he's convinced that all parents must 
bear the responsibility of what their chil- 
dren may see on the screen. 

He can recall the Saturday afternoons 
of his own childhood, when he sat in 
darkened movie houses and watched the 
Robinsons, Cagneys and Rafts display far 
more intricate violence than is evidenced 
today. "I don't know that seeing them and 
what they did made any appreciable dif- 
ference in the way we grew emotionally," 
he declares, but he's quick to call that 
declaration no excuse: "Certainly, dis- 
cretion should be used. But you just about 
never hear of juvenile delinquents who 
were properly patrolled by their parents." 

Frank Nitti is seldom discussed in the 
Gordon home. But he can't entirely be 
avoided: "Not long ago," says Bruce, "my 
boys came home a little late for dinner 
and I got tough. They retaliated by ask- 
ing, 'Do you have to be Frank Nitti at 
home, too?' " 



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On the Wagon— Off the Wagon? 



(Continued from page 25) 
Unfortunately, there is a lack of a dra- 
matic proving-ground in America today. 
Everything having to do with show busi- 
ness is too expensive nowadays for a 
novice to get the experience that would 
make it possible for him to develop. . . . 
So, along came Wagon Train when I 
needed it most. A series demands an 
actor's exertion five days each week; 
it provides opportunity for him to try 
different techniques, and it subjects 
him to pressures." 

One of the pressures (of which Bob 
no longer speaks) was the antagonism 
of the late Ward Bond. People who 
worked in the series say that differences 
of opinion between the two men were 
inevitable. Bond was primarily a foot- 
ball player who had drifted into the 
bare-knuckle school of one-dimensional 
characterization. He was a great guy, 
but his approach to acting was physical 
and he had only profane disdain for a 
player who approached a role with 
cerebral questions such as: "What is 
my motivation for this scene?" or 
"What new dimension of character is 
explored in this sequence?" Bond was 
as uncomplicated as a boxing glove; 
Horton is as complex as an intercon- 
tinental ballistic missile. 

Bob says, "I began to believe that I 
had realized the greatest potential of 
the McCullough character during the 
second week of Wagon Train's second 
year — that's quite a while ago. During 
that week and the next, through eight 
or ten segments, I had a chance to play 
melodrama — I was about one-third of 
a stunt man in one chapter . . . fights, 
flights by night, really rough work . . . 
I had a chance to do a comedy show, 
a suspense bit, and a sensitive segment 
in which Flint McCullough established 
communication with a little girl, treat- 
ing her as a person, not as a small, 
poorly-trained animal. . . . 

"If the first year's segments could be 
shown in anthology, followed by the 
fifth year's chapters, I think the con- 
trast would demonstrate that I have 
matured as a human being, and that the 
character of Flint McCullough matured 
as we went along. Neither of us is the 
same man he was in the beginning." 

Bob's serious approach to any job is 
indicated by the work he did on that 
first year's segments. He discovered that 
each chapter, written by a different 
author with a divergent slant on the 
personality of Flint McCullough, por- 
trayed the scout in a new way. For 
cohesion's sake, Bob invented a back- 
ground and character structure for 
Flint, and wrote a manual which has 
since guided writers for the series. Not 
every writer was grateful for the help; 
there was some grumbling, but Bob is 
not a man who gives up when he knows 
he's right. 



Apparently there was some dissen- 
sion on Wagon Train because Bob re- 
fused to allow Flint McCullough to 
"become a costume." The TV industry 
is blood brother of film manufacturing, 
and both branches of the family go for 
gimmicks. The striped vest, the hog's- 
leg firearm, the white hat for good guys 
and the black horse for varmints, the 
ruffled shirt and the swallow-tailed coat 
— all have been employed to "establish" 
a character. 

An exception was McCullough. Bob 
played him as an individual who modi- 
fied his garb with the season and the 
weather; he wore a slicker in the rain, 
a sheepskin-lined leather jacket during 
a snowstorm; he wore chaps when the 
trail led through deep undergrowth, and 
he wore levis when Wagon Train moved 
across the prairie. 

The result of Bob's sticking to the 
concept of an actor playing a part 
(rather than a costume indicating char- 
acter) has been that "people, having 
seen me each week — but not forever 
the same — have wanted to see me func- 
tion in other areas. Still, I have never 
capitalized on Wagon Train. For in- 
stance, when I appeared as Sky Master- 
son in a 1959 summer production of 
'Guys and Dolls,' I was billed as Robert 
Horton and no mention was made of 
my TV role. The same is true of my 
summer 1960 appearance in 'Briga- 
doon.' " 

When Hollywood people, landlocked 
before TV sets, heard about Bob's suc- 
cess in "Guys and Dolls" and "Briga- 
doon," they asked, "What's Horton, an 
ace oater, doing with the song-and- 
dance bit?" Actually, it was all part of 
getting off the Wagon. Bob had started 
vocal training when the series was less 
than a year old. He says, "I've never 
wanted to be a 'safe' actor. Many peo- 
ple are content to continue the thing 
that brought success. They are unwill- 
ing to change their style, try something 
new, extend themselves in an unex- 
plored direction. 

"Sure — I'll admit that testing a new 
boundary is like giving birth. You have 
to expect to suffer the pains and anx- 
ieties of any genesis. However, once 
you've gone through the pangs of pro- 
duction, you feel as a new mother must 
feel when her child is placed in her 
arms." And he adds, "To be afraid of 
failing is human and natural; to be 
afraid to try — even though you realize 
that you may fail — is the greatest pos- 
sible sin against oneself." 

Carping critics might say it's just 
dandy for the perennially successful to 
spout philosophy, but that would be an 
injustice to Bob. He is no stranger to 
falling on his face. In 1960, he returned 
to England for his second singing tour. 
His 1959 personal appearance had been 
received with laudatory notices; how- 



ever, in 1960, he caught cold during a 
week's layover in New York, and was 
unable to rehearse. His Atlantic cross- 
ing was storm-tossed, and the plane was 
so late in landing that he had to go 
directly from airport to theater. 

As he says, "You can't stand up in 
front of an audience and explain, 'I'm 
sorry, but I've had a cold for a week. 
Also I'm tired, so I'll appreciate your 
making allowances.' " Instead, he sang 
"Time After Time," "Just In Time," 
and "So In Love," to the best of his 
ability, circumstances considered. 

The press ignored the circumstances 
and treated Mr. Horton to a royal grill- 
ing. Doggedly. Bob continued his tour. 
He conquered his cold, sharpened his 
technique, and gradually won his audi- 
ences. By the time he reached Liverpool, 
he was sending home rave notices. 

He wrote to Marilyn Bradley (whom 
he married on December 31. 1960) : "I 



have learned a useful term from my 
business manager: Quid pro quo. It 
means giving a fair return for a fair 
output. In my case, exchanging enter- 
tainment for the time and money of an 
audience. I take this obligation very 
seriously." 

How will this quid pro quo ideal be 
solidified in action? 

Bob was offered the starring role in 
each of two different Broadway-bound 
musicals before he finished the final 
segment of his Wagon Train stint. He 
intends to accept whichever role offers 
the greatest challenge. He says, "I 
want to become as much a fixture on 
Broadway, in the musical theater, as I 
have become a fixture in television." 

Everyone who knows him well be- 
lieves that Bob. having unhitched his 
star from the Wagon, is about to lasso 
a rocket to the moon. 

We'll keep you posted. 



"Kiss Me Sexy! Kiss Me Sexy!" 



(Continued from page 21) 
worked in a logging camp in Oregon for 
a year. While he was in service, based 
for a time at Fort Ord. he used a three- 
day pass to make a flying trip to Seattle 
to visit relatives. On the way home 
through a stormy Sunday night. Clint and 
the Navy patrol-plane pilot rode the air- 
craft into the sea ; Clint — who had been 
teaching a course in survival techniques — 
took an involuntary postgraduate course. 
He swam four miles to shore. 

During this same general period. Clint 
was making good use of his free time by 
working in a nearby tavern ... as a bounc- 
er. He had little trouble, because — like 
Gable, Tracy, and Stewart — he was as 
popular with members of his own sex as 
he was with the gals. "I've always been 
lucky," he shrugs, "always had a lot of 
friends. And. if Will Rogers will excuse 
me, I've never met a girl I didn't like." 

This geniality might have had no par- 
ticular result, except total acceptance 
within his own small circle, if Clint had 
taken up life as a businessman in some 
middling-sized U.S. city. That it was 
Clint's destiny to become famous, to be 
recognizable almost anywhere in Amer- 
ica and around the globe, has resulted in 
some fascinating problems. 

People who traveled with Clint on his 
personal appearance junkets last summer 
say that, by the time he returned to Cali- 
fornia, Clint was baffled, flattered, and 
"shook." Pleased, you understand — but 
perplexed . . . and wary. 

It started as he walked through a hotel 

bby the first evening of the trip. A 
crush of teenagers had assembled spon- 
taneously, upon hearing that Clint East- 
wood was to appear on a local deejay 
show. As Clint made his way along the 
living corridor, hands reached out to 
stroke him. They caressed his shoulders, 
his muscular back, his biceps, his hair. 



Once in the car, Clint turned to one 
of his companions and blurted, "Now I 
know how a Collie pup feels at a Sun- 
day-school picnic." His companion grinned 
wickedly and cracked. "More like a stal- 
lion at a horse show. Whoa, boy." 

The next morning, as Clint was having 
breakfast in the hotel dining room, a 
dimpled, brown-eyed waitress passed Clint 
a note. It supplied her name and address 
and continued. "Will you please send me 
an autographed photograph? I'd like the 
picture to show a front shot of you in 
bathing trunks just after you've been 
swimming. And I'd rather have a color 
picture instead of black and white." 

When the Rawhide troupe went on lo- 
cation last fall, the unit manager chose 
an area which has remained largely un- 
changed since the 1870s. A ghost town. 
still in excellent repair, is conveniently 
situated among rocks and crags . . . how- 
ever, a short distance away, there is a 
thriving settlement with an excellent mo- 
tel, bar, bowling alley, supermarket. 

The bartender told Clint: "Civilization? 
Sure, we've got it to a degree, but look 
out for the women in this town. We 
ought to rename this place Frantic City. 
F'rinstance, the redhead at the other end 
of the bar wants to buy you a drink." 

"She wants to buy me a drink?" Clint 
echoed. "Thanks, but I'll buy mine and 
one for her — if she'll stay at her end of 
the bar. I've been on horseback all day 
and I'm too tired to talk." 

Conversation may not have been prin- 
cipally on the mind of the lady who lifted 
her glass in salute to Clint . . . but she 
must have been the only silent type in 
town. Clint went to his cottage at 9:30 
p.m. At 9:31 p.m., the telephone rang. 
Clint's roommate (one of the technicians 
for Rawhide) answered. Cooed a dulcet 
voice: "Clint, you don't know me. but I'm 
a devoted fan of yours. I thought you 



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might be lonesome, so I called to invite 
you to come up to my house for cake and 
coffee." 

"This isn't Clint. I don't know where 
he is. Will / do instead?" asked the tech- 
nician, eager to be helpful. Slam! went 
the telephone. Sometimes a Good Samari- 
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From that moment until after mid- 
night, the telephone rang every five or 
ten minutes. The technician told Clint 
the next morning, "I didn't do myself a 
bit of good — and there you lay, sleeping 
as if the telephone had never been in- 
vented!" 

At the end of the week, location shoot- 
ing completed, Clint decided to make a 
quick trip to San Francisco to join his 
wife Maggie and visit Maggie's parents. 
As he strode through International Air- 
port, looking around for the blonde and 
beautiful girl of his dreams, Clint real- 
ized that he was not alone. A statuesque 
doll was keeping step with him. When 
he slowed his pace, she slowed hers; when 
he speeded to a near-sprint, she matched 
his stride. 

So he stopped. She stopped, turning 
to face him. "I've been pretending that 
we're married," she said. "I'm five feet, 
ten inches tall in flats, so it's almost im- 
possible for me to find a guy who makes 
me feel slight and feminine, but you do. 
And how you do. You're the perfect sex 
symbol. Are you and your wife getting 
along okay, or is there a chance for me?" 

From a distance of thirty feet came a 
joyous cry: "Clint!" 

"Maggie!" yelled Clint, taking his wife 
into his arms — and adding, "I've never 
been so happy to see anybody in my life." 

Neither of the Eastwoods was much 
surprised, a few days later, to read a line 
in one of the movie columns to the effect 
that "a northern informant says that Clint 
and Maggie Eastwood are breaking up." 

Not even in Hollywood is a good man 



safe. Clint and Maggie had a ball at a 
big party, one evening, but were a little 
amazed to read subsequent reports of the 
gala. One account said that Clint and a 
celebrated glamour girl had "danced 
every dance together and had eyes for no 
one else." As Clint remarked to Maggie, 
"Dancing every dance would have been a 
good idea — except that we've been work- 
ing twelve hours a day for the past two 
weeks, and you couldn't coax me off that 
sofa." 

Maggie merely grinned. She knows her 
lad. She is convinced that — in addition 
to the obvious sex appeal which comes 
off the picture tube — there is a paramount 
quality in the Eastwood makeup which 
gives him his terrific impact: Integrity. 
A word one doesn't hear often these days. 
A rare and wonderful word which stands 
beside that other bulwark word, love, to 
give a wife a sense of security. 

And a good thing, too . . . because, the 
other day, Clint made a personal appear- 
ance at the opening of a new shoe store 
in a city which shall remain nameless. 
In the midst of a brief program, there 
came an interruption. She was about six- 
teen with a gorgeous head of curly brown 
hair, eyelashes to shame a Jersey cow, and 
a marvelous profile all the way down. 
Hurling herself at Clint, she pressed 
against his chest and encircled his body 
with strong young arms. Tipping back 
her head, she begged, "Kiss me sexy! 
Please — kiss me sexy, Clint!" 

Clint looked around wildly, calling to 
an associate, "Come take her away from 
me." As the girl was disentangled, Clint 
proved himself to be the Western-type 
Beau Brummel expected by his fans. To 
save face for the girl, he said, "You see, 
lady, my will power is weak." 

He added to an associate, as he re- 
treated to the dressing room: "And if 
anybody wants me, just say I went that- 
away! 



There'll Be Some Changes Made 



(Continued from page 58) 
Washington's Birthday of that year, Sara 
Karr, feminine lead of The Edge Of 
Night, breathed her last right on camera. 
She was run down by an automobile while 
saving her baby daughter. 

The network's switchboards across the 
country were tied up for hours with calls 
from bewildered, unbelieving and out- 
raged viewers. The mail was unprece- 
dented in both tone and volume. Teal 
Ames, who had played Sara from the 
show's beginning on April 7, 1956, simply 
"wanted out" and had given notice some 
months before. 

"We just couldn't stick a new face in 
there and call her Sara," the producer 
explained. "Teal was too closely identi- 
fied with the part. It was different in radio 
— an actress only had to sound like her 
predecessor. We couldn't have Sara go 
off somewhere to visit and leave her fam- 



ily. That was out of character for the kind 
of wife she was. So we did what we had 
to." But nothing like it had every hap- 
pened before, in full sight of an estimated 
ten million viewers. It made daytime serial 
history. 

Incidentally. Teal Ames has left act- 
ing, at least for now, and is on the West 
Coast with a group of people interested 
in a new philosophy of living. "Teal cares 
more about soul development than fame," 
one of her closest friends has commented. 

When — eight months later, on October 
10 — Mike Karr departed the same show, 
because John Larkin who played him 
sought greener fields in Hollywood, the 
effect was anti-climactic. John's leaving 
should have blown up a much greater 
storm than Teal's. The Edge Of Night, 
unlike other serials, is the kind of action 
drama which puts the main emphasis on 
the male lead, and both men and ivomen 



thought he was just great. But the show 
had learned its lesson. Karr departed for 
the state capital to assist with the Gov- 
ernor's crime commission, and there was 
a last lovely scene when Mike and his 
two-year-old Laurie Ann (played by Lar- 
kin's real daughter, Victoria) said good- 
bye to the family for a while. The way 
was thus left open for Mike to return 
any day — as indeed he may. 

One discerning viewer, noting that Lar- 
kin was in the show less and less during 
last fall, asked us pointblank if he "was 
going to do a Teal Ames and leave." 
Proving that the real fans of the serials 
grow alert to the small signs of big events 
to come. 

Impending cast changes are usually "top 
secret," known only to those who must 
be told. There was a leading male actor 
who had become so independent that the 
producers worried. What if he walked off 
one day and left them without a hero? 
They searched for a "younger brother" 
type with the same appeal to feminine 
viewers — and succeeded admirably. The 
new man was gradually built up, not as 
a threat to the older actor, but as "an 
ace in the hole" for the guardians of the 
show's popularity. 

A young actress in a pivotal part on 
another serial was warned for six months 
that she should lose weight. In real life, 
she was described admiringly as "well 
stacked," but the ten pounds that TV 
cameras add seemed even more on her. 
She didn't — or couldn't — make it. And 
now a slimmer girl plays her part. 

Sometimes it's something as prosaic as 
"contract trouble" which puts a new face 
up there on your set where a familiar 
old one has greeted you. Failing to come 
to terms at renewal time made Rod Hen- 
drickson withdraw, last summer, as the 
beloved newspaper editor, Ben Fraser, in 
From These Roots. And his departure 
seems now a prophetic piece of bad luck, 
since the series itself was removed from 
the scene completely on January 2 of this 
year. (Its replacement: Our Five Daugh- 
ters, about which we'll be telling you in 
a later story.) 

Sometimes changes come about because 
of love and marriage. When Wendy Drew 
met the man of her dreams, married, and 
left the role of Ellen in As The World 
Turns, Patricia Bruder was carefully se- 
lected. In the script, Ellen went on a trip 
for a short time. However, Patsy looks 
quite a bit like Wendy, and the fans now 
gladly accept the new Ellen. 

Sometimes an actor leaves a show, and 
wants to come back. Lynn Loring, who 
created the role of Patti on Search For 
Tomorrow when she was nine — and then 
grew up with the part — decided to leave, 
last summer, at eighteen. She still loved 
the role and the show, but there was the 
kind of offer from Hollywood no young 
actress could turn down. 

She flew out from New York to do the 
usual hair and wardrobe tests. Result: 
Diminutive Lynn, with the serenely lovely 



face, was found to photograph far too 
young for the romantic lead she was sup- 
posed to play in a Disney feature film. 
"I looked fourteen," she wailed. Lynn will 
no doubt be playing Patti again. 

On The Secret Storm, fans may often 
wonder about Haila Stoddard, who has 
had a long run as Pauline Fuller. Haila's 
part has been written out for some time 
now, because of her dual activities as a 
producer and actress. She is half of the 
production team for Noel Coward's cur- 
rent Broadway hit musical, "Sail Away," 
and always has at least a finger in some 
Broadway or off-Broadway show. 

Actors are often written out temporarily, 
during stage rehearsals and road tours 
preliminary to the Broadway opening — 
written in again as their time permits, 
when the show gets going — or welcomed 
back into the fold when the show flops. 

Sometimes the going gets rather rough. 
When William Prince began the part of 
Dr. Jerry Malone in Young Dr. Malone, 
he was in the midst of the tryout tour of 
the Broadway play, "The Third Best 
Sport," opposite Celeste Holm. His life 
was a series of quick trips to New York 
to rehearse the TV show, and back to 
Washington — and later, Philadelphia — to 
carry out his stage commitment. 

There was another notable innovation 
in recent months in the serials. The Bright- 
er Day, formerly done live from New York, 
moved bag-and-baggage to Hollywood, 
where it is now taped. Many cast mem- 
bers were asked to accompany the show 
out West. Blair Davies and Mona Bruns, 
playing Rev. Richard Dennis and his sis- 
ter, Aunt Emily, were two key people 
who went along. But some performers 
had other commitments in and around 
New York, and some were loathe to leave 
the East for personal reasons. 

Nancy Malone, who had played Babbie 
for some time, was one who didn't make 
the trip. She appears regularly in the New 
York-based Naked City, likes to stay near 
Broadway. She soon found herself happily 
ensconced as Robin in The Guiding Light, 
a part filled at various times by various 
other actresses. Now it has been expanded 
for Nancy and, if she stays in it long 
enough, it may be another one of those 
roles where it becomes harder and harder 
to "stick in a new face." 

When Audrey Peters took over from 
Bonnie Bartlett as Vanessa in Love Of 
Life, it just happened to be Vanessa's 
wedding day. Ron Tomme, who plays 
Bruce Sterling, found himself engaged to 
one girl on Friday and marrying another 
one on Monday ! Sometime later, Lee Law- 
son took over the part of Sterling's daugh- 
ter Barbara from Nina Reader, with hardly 
a hitch in the proceedings. 

Because, as every devoted viewer knows, 
performers may come and go. Characters 
disappear and reappear. Sometimes with 
the same face, sometimes not at all the 
same. But the stories go on and on. As a 
famous dramatist once wisely said — "The 
play's the thing." 




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A Bonus for Lady Sports Fans 



(Continued from page 44) 
he entered the field of radio and television. 
As a matter of fact, Palmer — who is now 
seen and heard each Saturday afternoon 
on NBC's on-the-spot telecast of National 
Basketball Association games, plus other 
network sports specials — actually had his 
start in Hollywood. 

He was born there, the son of Maurice 
"Lefty" Flynn, an All-America football 
player at Yale who became a silent-movie 
star. "Most of my dad's pictures were 
Westerns," says Palmer. "He'd have been 
a sensation on television." 

It was in Hollywood that Bud became 
interested in basketball. "I was about six 
years old, and there was a backboard in 
the public school yard. It was only natural 
that I would start throwing the ball 
around." 

W^hen he was nine, Bud's mother Blanche 
— who now lives in Princeton, New 
Jersey — took him and his sister Barbara 
to Europe for four years. "I went to school 
in Switzerland, and forgot all about bas- 
ketball. My sports interests there were in 
skiing, soccer, hockey and rowing. Some 
of the knowledge I gained then, about these 
sports, is paying off for me in a big way 
now when I do my sports specials." 

Palmer returned to the U.S. when he 
was fourteen and entered Phillips Exeter 
Academy in New Hampshire. "It was there 
that I became a man," he laughs. "When 
I entered Exeter, I was five-feet-three and 
weighed 103 pounds. When I left, four 
years later, I was six-feet-four and 
weighed 184." 

The next stop was Princeton University, 
where Palmer was an Ail-American in 
three sports — basketball, lacrosse and 
soccer — and was voted the best athlete in 
his class. "While I was at Princeton, I 
planned on eventually entering the diplo- 
matic service. Becoming a television an- 
nouncer or even a professional athlete, 
was something I had never even con- 
sidered." 

After graduation, he entered the Naval 
Air Corps, and was discharged in early 
1946 as a Lieutenant, Junior Grade. "Al- 
though I became a pilot," says Bud, "most 
of my Naval career was spent on the bas- 
ketball court. This wasn't necessarily by 
choice — the Navy has a way of telling you 
what to do. 

"I remember one day when 500 of us 
reported to the Chapel Hill, North Caro- 
lina Pre-Flight School at 5 :30 in the morn- 
ing. There was the usual formation, then 
ten of us were told to remain behind when 
the others were dismissed. We were or- 
dered to report to the gymnasium, where 
we scrimmaged all day and played our 
first game as 'the Chapel Hill team' that 
night." 
T Shortly after his discharge, Bud attend- 
J[ ed a National Basketball Association game 
at Madison Square Garden. "As I sat 
there," he recalls, "it suddenly dawned on 



me that the players I was watching were 
fellows I played with or against in the 
Ivy League or in the Navy. 

"The next day, I went to see Ned Irish, 
the boss-man of the New York Knicker- 
bockers, and told him I'd like to play pro 
ball. Ned phoned Joe Lapchick, the coach 
at St. John's, who remembered me from 
my Princeton days and recommended me. 
Mr. Irish offered me a contract." Palmer 
joined the Knicks for the 1946-47 season 
and remained with them for three years, 
captaining the team for the last two. 

"While I was playing pro basketball," 
he says, "I began to think about the future 
and what I wanted to do in life. I thought 
some of becoming a coach, but I changed 
my mind when I saw what was happening 
to Joe Lapchick, who left St. John's and 
was coaching the Knicks. Joe went through 
murder on the bench. His health suffered. 
He began trying to read newspapers in the 
dark. I didn't want that to happen to me. 

"During my last season with the Knicks, 
I got into television, indirectly. I began 
selling films — old movies — to TV stations 
in the various cities we visited. They were 
horrible movies. Twenty-five of them were 
Westerns which could have been cut up 
and made into forty-five films without any- 
one knowing the difference." 

Following the 1948-49 basketball season. 
Bud made his debut as a TV performer. "I 
was a big man on daytime kiddie shows in 
New York," he grins. "I appeared regularly 
on two programs — Kids A.C. and Gobo's 
Circus. On the latter show, I was 'Palmo 
the Magician.' There are still people who 
remember that show and call me 'Palmo.' 
I was the world's worst magician. I couldn't 
even fool the kids in the studio audience!" 

His sports-announcing career began in 
1949, when he joined Marty Glickman in 
broadcasting the Knickerbocker games on 
radio Station WMGM in New York. In the 
years since then, he has been one of radio- 
TV's busiest sportscasters and has telecast 
a wider variety of sports than any other 
network announcer. 

It's a challenge," says Bud, "when 
I'm assigned to televise a sport few people 
know anything about — the lesser-known 
sports, such as tennis, rodeos, ice skat- 
ing, rowing. There is no precedent to 
follow. You make your own rules. It's 
not like baseball, football or basketball, 
where camera techniques have been per- 
fected." 

Palmer considers radio to be more diffi- 
cult for a sports announcer than television. 
"Of course," he admits, "you can get away 
with more on radio than you can on TV, 
where the audience can see for itself what 
is going on. I've learned that you can 
never get into trouble on TV by talking 
too little. When in doubt, I keep my big 
mouth shut. On the other hand, on ra- 
dio you have to talk constantly." 

Bud admits that he has had a lot of 
breaks, but points out that, when they 



came along, he was ready for them. 
"That's the secret of success in any 
business. You can't sit home and wait 
for a break to happen. You have to go 
out and look for it. 

"When an opening came along, several 
years ago, for someone to broadcast the 
play-by-play of the Rangers' hockey games 
here in New York, I went to see Ned Irish 
again and asked for the job. He said, 
'But, Bud, you've never had any experi- 
ence broadcasting hockey.' I told him 
that, if he gave me the job, I'd be ready. 

During the training season that year, 
I spent six weeks in Canada, at my own 
expense, learning everything I could about 
hockey and doing the play-by-play on a 
tape recorder. When the season started, 
I wasn't doing my first game. I'd already 
done about fifty on the tape. That's what 
I mean about making your own breaks, 
and being ready for them." 

He considers the United States — U.S.S.R. 
hockey game in the 1960 Olympics his 
greatest thrill as an announcer. "It was 
the first time the U.S. ever won an Olym- 
pic Gold Medal in hockey," Bud notes. 
"And the natural rivalry between the U.S. 
and Russia built up a tension so thick 
you could have cut it with a knife." 

His most embarrassing moment on TV 
came at the start of an NBC bowling show 
— when he introduced himself by saying. 
"Hi, everybody, I'm Tom Hennesey!" As 
he explains, "Hennesey was a bowler on 
the program — I don't understand why I 
used his name as mine. It just came 
out. It broke me up and I laughed all 
during the show." 

Bud and his wife Daisy — whom he met 
on a blind date — share an enthusiasm for 
sports, are active participants in tennis, 
golf, water skiing and skin diving. They 
live in an attractive Park Avenue duplex 
with their two daughters Betty, 11, and 
Gene, 2, and son John, 4. 

But, while the children do watch Bud 
on TV, he's not their favorite performer. 
"My daughter Gene prefers Popeye. And 
John frequently tells me. T like to watch 
you, Dad, but I like Yogi Bear better'!" 

Nevertheless, Bud foresees a tremen- 
dous future for sports on television. "TV 
has come a long way, but there is still 
lots of room for improvement, especially 
in respect to human interest. The visual 
impression on TV is much stronger than 
the audio impression. People would rather 
see it than have you talk about it. 

"I've heard lecturers talk for two hours 
about a subject — and gained less than 
from seeing a five-minute film on the same 
subject. That's something we have to re- 
member in television. We should let the 
cameras do the work. That's what tele- 
vision is all about." 

And when the cameras are on Bud 
Palmer himself, even the least sports- 
minded ladies have something to cheer 
about ! 




ON THE RECORD 



FEBRUARY 1962 



Don Mills 
Music Editor 



L 



• There's a new twist in the music 
business now. as almost everybody 
knows. The phenomenal success of the 
new dance fad (among the more 
athletic members of society) has 
brought renewed interest from adults 
in single (or 45 RPM records) — and 
perhaps greater understanding of 
today's popular music. Most important, 
the new twisters are finding that this 
so-called "teen-age" music is fun! 

Record companies are diligently try- 
ing to supply the demand for twist 
music. In fact, nearly every pop record 
that includes drums, guitar and saxo- 
phone is called a twist. The original 
and best-selling twist is the Chubby 
Checker version on Parkway, which is 
combined with his other twist singles 
in an LP called "Your Twistin' Party" 
(Parkway 7007). Chubby is undoubt- 
edly the hottest property around right 
now. (See him demonstrating the Twist 
on page 36.) And he stands to profit 
mightily from the happy accident that 
gave impetus to the Twist craze. 

Another artist whose future is secure 
is Joey Dee, who happened to be on 
the spot at New York's Peppermint 
Lounge when Society paid its visit. 
Roulette outbid the other record firms 
for his services and immediately re- 
leased "Doin' the Twist at the Pepper- 
mint Lounge" (Roulette 25166). 

As soon as publicity on the Twist 
broke in national magazines, record 
company executives rushed about with 
contracts and pen in hand, looking for 
any artists remotely connected with the 
Peppermint Lounge. Scepter Records 
discovered they had had Joey Dee 
under contract for a while, so they 
immediately rushed into production an 
LP of material previously recorded, 
titling it "Joey Dee and the Pepper- 
mint Twisters" (Scepter 503). 

Other Twist LP's rushed onto the 
scene include "Do the Twist With Ray 
Charles" (Atlantic 8054), "It's Twistin' 
Time," (Capitol 1578) with George 
Hudson and the Kings of Twist, "Twist 
With the Ventures" (Dolton 2010), 
"Arthur Murray's Music for Dancing 
the Twist" (RCA Victor LPM 2492), 
"Society Dances the Twist," Lester 
Lanin and His Orchestra (Epic 3825). 




Both principals in the Twist rage, 
Chubby Checker and Joey Dee. are 
working on motion pictures featuring 
the Twist. Paramount has just released 
"Hey, Let's Twist," starring Joey Dee 
and the Starliters, which will tell 
the story of the Peppermint Lounge 
and the start of the Twist craze. 
Chubby is now in London filming "It's 
Trad, Dad," a British-American release 
marking his film debut. 



Single records with twist in the title 
keep coming in a never-ending flow. 
Probably the most far-fetched tie-in is 
Elvis' new "Rock-A-Hula Baby," which 
Victor is calling a "Twist Special." 
Few others of the 50 or more released 
so far seem to have a chance. And 
what ever happened to Hank Ballard, 
who merely wrote the original Twist 
and first released it? Well, at least. he'll 
get royalties. 



95 




OM THE RECORD 



Broadway Shows on Record 






T 
V 
R 

96 




WBRT 






• How to succeed in business without 
really trying? Simple. Any record 
industry tycoon worth his secretary's 
typewriter knows the answer, and so 
does his secretary. Record a Broadway 
hit. 

These sentiments come direct from 
the publicity department of RCA 
Victor which — as the largest company 
in the record business — should know. 
Further qualification: Producer of 
Broadway's new smash musical comedy, 
"How to Succeed in Business Without 
Really Trying." 

Of course, it would be unfair to say 
there's no effort involved in recording 
a Broadway hit. First off, you've got to 
find a Broadway hit, then make sure 
you've the right to record it. The 
major record companies have found 
they have a better chance of getting 
recording rights if they happen to have 
money invested in the " show. Victor, 
Columbia, Capitol and a few others 
have been doing just that. 

Columbia's $300,000 investment in 
"My Fair Lady" brought the biggest 
returns ever. Victor has the feeling that 
its "How to Succeed . . ." could be just 
as big. Columbia's "Kean," starring 
Alfred Drake, is forecast as another 
blockbuster. Capitol's big entry this 
season is Noel Coward's "Sail Away," 
starring Elaine Stritch. 

Here's a run-down of the new Broad- 
way show albums most likely to suc- 
ceed: "How to Succeed In Business 
Without Really Trying" (RCA Victor 
LOC-1066) — Far and away the biggest 
hit this season, this riotous satire of 



big business, starring Robert Morse 
and Rudy Vallee, has a sparkling score 
by Frank Loesser and a wondrously 
funny script, due mostly to Broadway's 
famed show doctor, Abe Burrows. The 
show is based on Shepherd Mead's 
book of advice for lazy junior execu- 
tives. The most enduring tune in the 
show: "The Company Way." 

"Sail Away" (Capitol WAO 1643) 
— Noel Coward's attempt at an Ameri- 
can musical comedy may be entertain- 
ing theater but is not enthralling 
music. Star Elaine Stritch does the one 
standout number in this satire on 
traveling Americans: "Why Do the 
Wrong People Travel?" 

"Kean" (Columbia KOL 5720/stereo 
KOS 2120)— Alfred Drake has a 
magnificent romp in this lavish produc- 
tion that recounts the adventures of a 
swashbuckling Shakespearean actor. 
Some critics believe it has a "My Fair 
Lady" success potential. The bubbling, 








tuneful score includes at least one 
show-stopper: "The Fog and the Grog." 

"Milk and Honey" (RCA Victor 
LOC 1065) — The sure voices of Robert 
Weede and Mimi Benzell make this 
one of the major musicals of the 
season, and Molly Picon is charming 
as a husband-seeking widow. She stops 
the show with "Hymn to Hymie." Most 
memorable tune: "Milk and Honey." 

"Let It Ride" (RCA Victor LOC 
1064) — George Gobel and Sam Levene 
starred in this remake of a sturdy plot 
which, in its first musical version, fea- 
tured Eddie Cantor as "Mr. Banjo 




Eyes." It is the hilarious tale of a 
meek office worker who can mirac- 
ulously pick the winning horse every 
time. "Let It Ride" tells the old story 
with a new musical score by old pros 
Jay Livingston and Ray Evans. 
Brightest tune: The title song "Let It 
Ride." The rousing show-stopper, "Just 
an Honest Mistake." 

Other Broadway shows scheduled for 
the original cast LP treatment include 
"Subways Are for Sleeping," "The 
Gay Life," "Oliver," "I Can Get It 
For You Wholesale," "New Faces," 
"A Funny Thing Happened On the 
i Way to the Forum," and "Barnum" — 
certainly a bumper crop. 

In addition, Capitol has released an 
original cast LP of a show that folded 
after a brief run. "Kwamina," a musi- 
cal set in South Africa, starred Sally 
Ann Howes, with music by veteran 
composer Richard Adler. Capitol 
reasons that the show did not fail on 
Broadway because of the music, "and 
music is precisely what you get in an 
original cast LP." 

Record dealers say Broadway show 
albums are among their top sellers. 
Here are 10 still in great demand: 

Camelot (Columbia KOL 5620), 
The Sound of Music (Columbia KOL 
5450), West Side Story (Columbia OL 
5230), Carnival (MGM 3946), South 
Pacific (Columbia OL 4180), My Fair 
Lady (Columbia OL 5090), Music Man 
(Capitol WAO 990), Fiorello (Capitol 
WAO 1321), Unsinkable Molly Brown 
(Capitol WAO 1509), and Gypsy 
(Columbia OL 5420). 



THE LISTENING POST 




• The success of Judy Garland's 
Carnegie Hall LP (Capitol BO 1569) 
has prompted both Decca and MGM to 
re-release some of her vintage record- 
ings that have been gathering dust in 
their vaults. These are "The Magic of 
Judy Garland" (Decca 4199) and "The 
Judy Garland Story" (MGM 3989) . The 
MGM album includes songs from six 
of her musicals for Metro. Judyphiles 
will want both of these albums. 

Art Linkletter, the genial host of 
long-running TV shows featuring party 
games, now has his first LP for Capitol, 
titled "Let's Play Games With Art Link- 
letter" (Capitol 1644). Nine games are 
on the disc, including a series of 
"sound" games, where the listener must 
identify hard-to-recognize everyday 
noises, famous voices and offbeat 
sounds. 




John D. Loudermillc 



As if the baker's dozen or more of 
Mitch Miller Sing-Along LP's were 
not enough, Columbia has issued two 
more, this time featuring two of Mitch's 
lovely soloists, Diana Trask (Colum- 
bia 1705) and Leslie Uggams (Co- 
lumbia 1706). Before you buy your 
next Sing-Along album, give these two 
a listen; we think you'll find them as 
exciting as the regular series. 

Or if you prefer, you can be the first 
in your block with an English Sing- 
Along LP, as recorded in London by 
Capitol, titled "An English Music Hall" 
(Capitol T10273). There's uninhibited 
fun ana gaiety here. 

For several years now they've been 
saying "big bands are coming back," 
but there was little to back up this state- 
ment. But now, Si Zentner's "Up a 
Lazy River" is high in popularity, the 
first straight big band arrangement to 
sell as a single in many years. It was 
taken from an LP called "Big Band 
Hits" (Liberty 3197) and released as 
a single. 

It's well known in the trade that suc- 
cessful song writers are also frustrated 
performers, and this month two top 
writers came from behind their song 
sheets and tape recorders to record their 
own LP's. Barry Mann hit with his 
second single for ABC-Paramount, 
"Who Put the Bomp (In the Bomp, 
Bomp, Bomp)" and it's the title of his 
new LP (ABC 399), consisting of his 
own compositions, such as "I Love How 
You Love Me," "The Way of a Clown," 
and "Bless You." From Nashville comes 
the talent of John D. Loudermilk 
singing his own tunes, including the 
hit single and LP title, "Language of 
Love" (RCA Victor LPM 2434). John 
is the creative spark behind such tunes 
as "Ebony Eyes," "Stayin' In," and 
"Sad Movies." 




Leroy Van Dyke 



Speaking of country-Western music, 
it's also given us Jimmy Dean's "Big 
Bad John," a No. 1 hit, Bobby Ed- 
ward's "You're the Reason," on Crest, 
Sue Thompson's "Sad Movies (Make 
Me Cry)" on Hickory, and Patsy 
Cline's "Crazy" on Decca. The latest 
to join this roster is Leroy Van Dyke, 
whose Mercury recording of "Walk On 
By" is rapidly moving toward No. 1. 
Leroy's first LP will be out soon. 



97 



T 
V 
R 

98 




ON THE RECORD 



UP 'N' COMER: 

Bobby Vee 

• One of the fast rising young per- 
sonalities today is Bobby Vee, whose 
fifth LP, "Take Good Care Of My 
Baby," (Liberty 3211), has just been 
released. The LP includes his two-side 
hit, "Run to Him" and "Walkin' With 
My Angel." 

Eighteen - year - old Bobby (Real 
name: Bob Velline) was born in North 
Dakota. Three years ago, he formed a 
group with his brother Bill and two 
other boys, Jim Stillman and Bob 
Korum, calling themselves Bobby Vee 
and the Shadows. They did not make 
much progress in their career until 
tragedy gave them their opportunity. 
When Buddy Holly and Ritchie Valens 
were killed in a plane crash, Bobby' 
and the group were asked to fill in. 
Not long after, they came to the atten- 
tion of Liberty Records, through Snuff 
Garrett, one of Liberty's A&R men, 
who'd been a friend of Buddy Holly. 

Garrett heard Bobby's first record, 
"Suzie Baby," on an unknown label and 
thought at the time that he sang with 
the same "feeling" as Holly. 

"Devil or Angel," Bobby's first record 
for Liberty, became the number one 
disc in the country, closely followed 
by a second smash hit, "Rubber Ball." 

Bobby's now doing a single act, and 
all his records seem to have that magic 
ingredient which makes a hit. And 
young Bobby will need that magic 
ingredient to help him during the 
transition from a teen to an adult per- 
sonality. The ballad "Run To Him" is 
a step in the right direction. 





RECORD 







-^-Hottest LP! I Remember Tommy, Frank Sinatra (Reprise) — A 
nostalgia-filled package for Frank's fans, old and new. 



On the Record's monthly survey of the hottest new LP's 
and singles lists those records showing the strongest sales 
in retail stores, based on reports from manufacturers, 
distributors, trade publications — including Bill Gavin 
Record Reports, Billboard Music Week, Cashbox, and 
Variety. 





BEST SELLING NEW LP'S 

Blue Hawaii, Elvis Presley (RCA Victor LPM 2426)— The songs from 
Elvis's movie, sung with his usual enthusiasm. 

Behind The Button-Down Mind, Bob Newhart (Warner Bros. 1417) 
— More "What-if" situations from the comedian in need of an encore (see 
page 102.). 

Never On Sunday, Connie Francis (MGM 3965) — Connie sings movie 
themes with spirit. 

Breakfast At Tiffany's, Henry Mancini (RCA Victor 2362)— Music 
from the hit movie. 

West Side Story, Original Cast (Columbia OL 5230), Movie Sound 
Track (Columbia OL 5670), Stan Kenton (Capitol 1609), Ferrante 
& Teicher (United Artists 3166). The big hit musical of the season. 
The Twist, Chubby Checker (Parkway 7001) — The music to twist your 
sacroiliac by. 

Your Twist Party, Chubby Checker (Parkway 7007)— A collection of 
all the twists by the king of the Twist himself. 

King Of Kings, Movie Sound Track (MGM 1E2) — Inspiring musical 
score of the Biblical epic. 

Milk And Honey, Original Cast (RCA Victor LOC 1065)— A beautiful 
production starring Robert Weede, Mimi Benzell and Molly Picon. 
Mexico, Bob Moore (Monument 4005) — Bright sounds from South of 
the Border. 

Golden Waltzes, Billy Vaughn (Dot 3280)— For those who have yet to 
discover the Twist. 

Doin' The Twist At The Peppermint Lounge, Joey Dee & The Star- 
liters (Roulette 25166) — Here's the group that created the national stir, 
twistin' up a storm. 

Chubby Checker— Bobby Rydell (Cameo 1013) — Two teen favorites 
doing bright, up-tempo material that is gassing their fans. 
Clap Hands, Here Comes Charlie, Ella Fitzgerald (Verve 4053) — 
Ella swinging effortlessly through standards and jazz themes. 
Do The Twist With Ray Charles (Atlantic 8054)— Old favorites, with 
the Twist beat, in a new collection. 

Runaround Sue, Dion (Laurie 2009) — Collection. Dion's most mature 
effort so far. 



OF THE MONTH 



^Hottest Single! The Lion Sleeps Tonight, The Tokens (RCA 
Victor) — Based on the old folk tune "Wimoweh," this version has 
a captivating sound. 



-The magic touch applied to an 
-This top-selling Western hit 



THE HOT SINGLES 

Run To Him, Bobby Vee (Liberty) 
up-tempo ballad. 

Walk On By, Leroy Van Dyke ( Mercury )- 
has wide appeal. 

Tonight, Ferrante & Teicher (United Artists) — From the hit Broadway- 
Hollywood musical. 

Happy Birthday, Sweet Sixteen, Neil Sedaka (RCA Victor) — A happy 
sound for the teens. 

When I Fall In Love, The Lettermen (Capitol) — A smooth follow-up 
to their first hit, "The Way You Look Tonight." 

'Til, The Angels (Caprice) — An unusual blend of voices on a recurring 
hit. 

Funny How Time Slips Away, Jimmy Elledge (RCA Victor) — A beau- 
tiful ballad sung with warmth and understanding. 

Well I Told You, The Chantells (Carlton) — Excellent answer to Ray 
Charles' recent hit. 

The Twist, Chubby Checker (Parkway) — The original and big-selling 
version. 

Moon River, Jerry Butler (Vee Jay), Henry Mancini (RCA Victor) — 
Two records. From the movie "Breakfast At Tiffany's." 
Let There Be Drums, Sandy Nelson (Imperial) — A driving beat and 
infectious arrangement. 

The Peppermint Twist, Joey Dee & The Starliters (Roulette) — Na- 
tional publicity helped this group from the Peppermint Lounge. 
There's No Other (Like My Baby), The Crystals (Philles)— This 
group sounds like the Shirelles. 

Rock-Hula Baby, Elvis Presley (RCA Victor)— A twist sound from his 
movie "Blue Hawaii." 

HOT SINGLES CONTENDERS 

Just Out Of Reach, Solomon Burke (Atlantic). 

Gypsy Woman, The Impressions (ABC). 

Up A Lazy River, Si Zentner (Liberty). 

When The Boy In Your Arms, Connie Francis (MGM). 

If You Gotta Make a Fool of Somebody, James Ray (Caprice). 

Turn Around, Look At Me, Glen Campbell (Crest). 

Johnny Will, Pat Boone (Dot). 

Unchain My Heart, Ray Charles (ABC). 

Dear Lady Twist, U.S. Bonds (Legrand). 

Hey! Little Girl, Del Shannon (Big Top). 

Maria, Roger Williams (Kapp). 

Let's Twist Again, Chubby Checker (Parkway). 

Revenge, Brook Benton (Mercury). 

The Majestic, Dion (Laurie). 

Little Altar Boy, Vic Dana (Dolton). 




UP 'N' COMERS: 

The Lettermen 

• Of the three boys that make up the 
new vocal group, The Lettermen, only 
Jim Pike is a genuine . letterman — he 
excelled in football at Idaho Falls 
High School. The others are Robert 
Engemann, who was a missionary for 
two years and now is an elder in the 
Mormon Church, though he's only 26, 
and Tony Butola, a veteran night club 
and studio singer, who is proud of 
being one of the few full-blooded 
Croatians in the world (Croatia is now 
a part of Yugoslavia). 

The boys' first big record was "The 
Way You Look Tonight," which intro- 
duced their distinctive blending of 
mellow voice tones. Their new Capitol 
record, "When I Fall In Love," is also 
well on its way toward Hitsville. 

Before organizing the trio last year, 
Tony had been a member of other 
groups dating back to the famed 
Mitchell Boys Choir. Robert had ap- 
peared with Lawrence Welk. And Jim 
had appeared in the Louis Prima-Keely 
Smith show at Hollywood's Moulin 
Rouge. 

Bob and Jim met at Brigham Young 
University in Utah, where they sang 
with groups appearing locally. A year 
ago in Los Angeles they met Tony and 
decided to try their luck together. Tony 
had already had some success with a 
group he organized in 1957, the Four- 
most, with which Connie Stevens got 
her start. 

Tony, whose hobby is song writing, 
was born in Sharon, Pennsylvania. He 
is 21. Jim is originally from St. Louis. 
Missouri, and he, like Bob, is 26. Bob, 
the only married member of the trio, 
is a native of Highland Park, Michigan. 

The smooth blend of sounds the boys 
have achieved certainly contradicts 
their diverse backgrounds. With hit 
potential assured, they may be making 
close harmony for quite a while ahead. 



99 




Your Monthly ON RECORD Guide 



POPULAR 

•••Broadway Swings Again, Jo- 
nah Jones (Capitol 1641) — Jonah's 
swinging trumpet takes the melodic 
line of 12 hit Broadway show tunes to 
continue his successful formula of 
bright arrangements of show tunes, 
mostly from the current season, includ- 
ing "If Ever I Would Leave You" (Cam- 
elot) , "The Sound Of Music," "Together 
Wherever We Go" (Gypsy), and "Til 
Tomorrow" ( Fiorello ! ) . 



11111 




'■.'"':: 



••••Clap Hands, Here Comes 
Charlie!, Ella Fitzgerald (Verve 4053) 
— Another album by Ella is always an 
event. Particularly notable in this ef- 
fort are three tunes most known as 
instrumental jazz compositions: Lester 
Young's "Clap Hands, Here Comes 
Charlie ! " Thelonius Monk's " 'Round 
Midnight," and Dizzy Gillespie's "Night 
In Tunisia." 

•••The Best of Steve Lawrence 

(ABC 392)— Steve is one of the few 
"quality" vocalists to sell single records 
and still maintain a warm, easy-going 
style. Included among expertly done 
ballads are two of his hits for ABC, 
"Footsteps," and "Pretty Blue Eyes." 

**• America's Biggest-Selling Pi- 
anist, Floyd Cramer (RCA Victor 
LPM 2466) — The highly distinctive pi- 
ano style of Floyd Cramer is heard 
here on his hit single, "Your Last Good- 
bye," and 11 others. His method of slur- 




ring the notes came, he says, from hear- 
ing old-style Southern steel guitarists. 
He calls it "a lonesome country sound," 
which might help explain the brash 
claim of the title. 

MOOD MUSIC 

••••Love Tide, Nelson Riddle 
(Capitol 1571) — Superb mood pieces 
from one of the most talented composer- 
arrangers. This collection of lush and 
lovely orchestrations is a fitting sequel 
to his highly successful "Sea of Dreams" 
LP of several years ago. 

•••Kern and Porter Favorites, 

Morton Gould (RCA Victor LM 2559) 
— The Gould touch on such Kern and 
Porter melodies as "The Way You Look 
Tonight," "I Get A Kick Out Of You," 
and "What Is This Thing Called Love," 
make pleasant background listening. 

•••More Music For Dining, Mela- 
chrino Strings (RCA Victor LPM 2412) 
— The unobtrusive arrangements of the 
Melachrino Strings are perfect for set- 
ting the romantic mood for that special 
tete-a-tete. Included are such flowing 
melodies as "You Are Too Beautiful" 
and "L' Amour Tou jours L'Amour." 

CLASSICAL 

••••The Incomparable Bjoer- 
ling, Jussi Bjoerling (RCA Victor LM 
2570) — Culled from recordings made 
during the last three years of his life, 



this LP is an excellent sampling of Mr. 
Bjoerling's art. He died last year at the 
height of his career. He is heard here 
in 12 arias from standard Italian tenor 
repertory. 

•••Concerto For Organ, Strings 
And Timpani (Poulenc) & Jeu de 
Cartes (Stravinsky), Charles Munch 
and the Boston Symphony Orchestra 
(RCA Victor LM 2567)— Stravinsky's 
delightful "Game Of Cards" is given a 
spirited reading here. Currently it is the 
only recording available. Originally 
composed as a ballet score, it is capa- 
ble of standing on its own. The Poulenc 
concerto is handled effectively by organ 
soloist Berj Zamkochian, but the main 
interest here is in the Stravinsky side 
of the record. 

••••Chopin Concerto No. 1, 

Artur Rubenstein, soloist (RCA Victor 
LM 2575) — Chopin's greatest interpre- 
ter has essayed a new recording of the 
E Minor Concerto, this time with the 
New Symphony Orchestra of London, 
Stanislaw Skrowaczewski conducting. 
Release of this recording coincides with 
a series of ten Carnegie Hall concerts 
given by Artur Rubenstein at the end 
of 1961. 

••••Malaguena, Carlos Montoya 
(RCA Victor LPM 2380)— Flamenco 
guitar and Carlos Montoya are almost 
synonymous, and in this new collection 
Montoya proves again his virtuosity in 
capturing the Gypsy spirit of these 
Spanish folk tunes. 







law 



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-M< IT'S YOUR MONEY 



••••Cesar Franck Symphony, 

Pierre Monteux conducting the Chicago 
Symphony Orchestra (RCA Victor LM 
2514) — The D Minor, Franck's one 
symphony, is given the majestic and 
regal treatment it deserves by Monteux. 

JAZZ 

•••••Time Further Out, Dave 
Brubeck (Columbia 1690) — Here's a 
minor classic for Brubeck fans. This 
album takes as its point of departure a 
jazz interpretation of an abstract paint- 
ing by Miro. But more specifically, it 
is an exercise in treating the blues with 
unusual (and one might even say off- 
beat) time signatures, such as 5/4 and 
9/8 time. The intricate rhythmic varia- 
tions are deftly handled. 

••••The Essential Count Basie, 

(Verve 8407) — Count Basie has en- 
dured when most big bands gave it up 
as a lost cause, and he and The Duke 
(see below) remain as today's giants 
of big-band jazz. This LP shows the 
Basie band off to good advantage as 
they do some of their early classics, 
such as "Jumping at the Woodside" and 
the great "One O'Clock Jump." 




••••The Indispensable Duke El- 
lington, (RCA Victor LPM 6009) — 
This rwo-LP set is a mu6t for Ellington 
fans, containing some of Duke's most 
memorable takes for Victor during the 
years 1940-46, that is, the pre-LP era. 
Along with the predictable inclusions, 
such as "Don't Get Around Much Any- 



more," "Carnegie Blues," "Sophisti- 
cated Lady," and "Mood Indigo," there 
are surprises, such as two piano-bass 
duets with famed bassist Jimmy Blan- 
ton, who died before his full potential 
could be realized. This is exciting El- 
lingtonia and not to be missed. 

••••Never On Sunday, Ramsey 
Lewis (Argo 686) — The Ramsey Lewis 
Trio has been achieving a particularly 
felicitous cohesion of sound on recent 
recording dates, and nowhere is this 
more true than on this LP. Every track 
here, from an exciting arrangement of 
"Never On Sunday" to the hit jazz ver- 
sion of "Waterboy" and the Gershwin 
classic "I Got Plenty Of Nothing," is 
easy listening. 




SHOW AND FILM MUSIC 

••Flower Drum Song, Sound Track 
(Decca 9098) — The main trouble with 
this movie version soundtrack of the 
Broadway musical hit is that it lacks 
theatricality. Perhaps what's missing is 
that special timbre of the theater pit 
band. Also missing is the exciting, vi- 
brant vocal gymnastics of Pat Suzuki. 
Nancy Kwan's voice sounds too thin 
and unsure to carry even the ballads, 
notably the beautiful "Sunday," much 
less to get across the piquant and saucy 
"I Enjoy Being a Girl." You would be 
advised to stick with the original Broad- 
way cast as recorded on Columbia OL 
5350. 




TEEN 

••••Chubby Checker & Bobby 
Rydell, (Cameo 1013)— This pair of 
show-wise teenagers put on a perform- 
ance that keeps moving from beginning 
to end, a pro job in every respect, and 
one that will provide lots of excitement 
for teen listeners and a few hip oldsters 
as well. Certainly this is a standout LP 
in its class. Chubby and Bobby have 
long been friends and had long wanted 
to do a record together. Their clown- 
ing around in a recording studio one 
day gave the first idea for the album. 
The infectious fun the boys were hav- 
ing spread to musicians and engineers 
alike. The result was an unusual "fun" 
recording. High spot is a medley of 
"Your Hits and Mine," with Bobby do- 
ing Chubby's Twist among other favor- 
ites like "Side by Side," and "My Baby 
Cares for Me." 

COMEDY 

•••Jose Jimenez In Orbit /Bill 
Dana On Earth, (Kapp 1257)— As a 
follow-up to his highly successful Astro- 
naut LP, Bill Dana has his pathetic 
Jose in orbit, with expected comedy 
results. Although, in essence, it's a 
stretched-out running gag, the situation 
is still good for some chuckles and guf- 
faws. The other side shows Bill Dana 
doing more down-to-earth impressions 
and characterizations, culled from his 
night club act. Dana's writing partner 
Don Hinkley acts as straight man on 
the set. 



101 



T 

V 
R 

102 




ON THE RBCORD 



the Many -Sided Mind 
of Bob Newhart 




• Bob Newhart is referred to by his 
record company, Warner Bros., as "the 
world's best seller of comedy albums." 
He is the only comedian who got his 
start as a record artist before branch- 
ing out to other facets of show business. 
And now he is the only recording 
comedian with his own television show. 
These are reasons enough for taking a 
close look "Behind The Button-Down 
Mind Of Bob Newhart" (Warner Bros. 
1417). 

On the face of it, Bob Newhart is a 
shining example of the successful "New 
Wave" comedians, a group which in- 
cludes Shelley Berman, Mort Sahl, 
Lennie Bruce and newcomer Dick 
Gregory. Mike Nichols and Elaine May 
qualify, too, and Jonathan Winters, 
Bill Dana, Charles Manna, Carl Reiner 
and Mel Brooks. Stan Freberg is un- 
doubtedly the most talented of the lot. 
And, for specialized or regional ma- 
terial, include Brother Dave Gardner, 
Rusty Warren, Wood Woodbury and 
Moms Mabley. 

Most of these comedians sold sur- 



prising numbers of records last year, 
which could point up the ' fact that 
Americans are in dire need of a laugh 
or two. Certainly radio and television 
no longer supply many of those laughs. 
In fact, radio has reversed the situa- 
tion, now depending on records to 
supply them with comedy material 
(with disc jockeys often complaining 
that comedy LPs contain too much 
"blue" material for the air). Television, 
of course, some time ago abandoned its 
comedians, or gave them bland situa- 
tion comedies to wallow in. The notable 
exception is Jack Paar, who has done 
more than anyone to give the "New 
Wave" comedians a chance to be heard 
— and to plug their records. And on 
television we now have Bob Newhart. 
How will he make out? 

There is a familiar, anguished cry 
in show business, "What do we do for 
an encore?" From where we sit in 
front of the television set it would seem 
that Bob Newhart is desperately trying 
to find the answer to that question. 

His first LP, "The Button-Down 



Mind Of Bob Newhart" (Warner Bros. 
1379), which catapulted him into the 
spotlight, is undoubtedly a pure gem 
of classic American comedy. Try, if 
you will, to improve on Newhart's 
sketch about the Commander of the 
U.S.S. Codfish talking to his men. The 
sketch covering the television rehearsal 
of the Khrushchev landing is superb 
topical humor. And the sketch about 
the driving instructor might well be 
come a necessary part of high-school 
audio-visual education in the future. 
Newhart is rightly celebrated for that 
first LP, but . . . "What do we do for 
an encore?" 

Record retailers will tell you that 
seldom does a second record by a 
comedian sell as well as the first one. 
Chalk it up to the novelty wearing off. 
Or, more frequently, a plain lack of 
good follow-up material. Certainly the 
Newhart legend has been kept alive 
better than most. But with a weekly 
television show eating up material, 
Newhart is bound to be looking harder 
and harder for that "Encore." 




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• POST GRADUATE SCHOOL OF NURSING * 

• Room 9N32 • 121 S. Wabash Ave. • Chicago 3, III. • 

• Please rush my FREE Nurses Booklet and Lesson Samples. • 

• 1 understand there is no cost or obligation and no sales- * 

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AND LESSON SAMPLES 

LEARN PRACTICAL NURSING AT 
HOME IN A FEW SHORT MONTHS 

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Approved member: Association of Home Study Schools 






My mother asked the doctor 

The doctor approved 

Now I'm a Tampax user, too 

This is the sort of report we receive 
about today's teen-agers. More and 
more, they're turning to Tampax at a 
younger and younger age. 

And why not? Tampax® internal 
sanitary protection can be used by any 
young woman — married or single, ac- 
tive or not. It's made of pure, surgical 
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and encased in a satin-smooth appli- 
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against outside contamination. 

Even though Tampax is so small and 
so soft, the advantages are enormous. 
You can bowl, dance, shower, bathe, 
even ski — in complete comfort.Tampax 
is out of sight, out of mind. And 
Tampax ends odor problems, ends 
chafing problems, ends disposal prob- 
lems. Users say they'd never dream of 
going back to anything else. 

Tampax may be purchased in your 
choice of 3 absorbency sizes (Regular, 
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are sold. One of them is right for you. 

■fa Outfit by Women's Haberdashers 

TA AA DAY Incor p° rated 

I r"l# Vlr h\/\ Palmer, Mass. 




MARCH, 1962 



MIDWEST EDITION 



VOL. 57, NO. 4 



IT HAPPENED THIS MONTH 

Jack Paar 17 "Slander!" Pat Greaves 

Vincent Edwards 18 A Cure for What Ails Every Woman Erika Maxson 

Dwayne Hickman 22 "I'm the Oldest Man on TV" Jane Ardmore 

Fabian 24 If You Think Fabian Is Only Kidding Eunice Field 

Jo Ann Castle 26 Lose Pounds Before You Lose Him ! . . . . Fredda Balling 

George Maharis 30 The Upside Down World of George Maharis . . Tony Wall 

Jack Benny 33 A Valentine From His Friends Charlie Manna 

Lawford-Sinatra 36 Are Peter and the Wolf Hurting the Kennedys? 

Bob Lardine 

Shore-Montgomery 38 The Woman Who Broke Up Dinah's Home. .Jim Hoffman 

Bert Parks 44 This Is the Way the Bert Bounces Frances Kish 

Lome Greene 46 The Best Kept Secret in Hollywood Irene Storm 

The Lennon Sisters 48 You Think You've Got Troubles! . .Isabelle "Sis" Lennon 

Bob Cummings 50 Bob Talks Back to the U.S. Government. . .Kathleen Post 

Our Five Daughters 52 Is There Room in Your Heart for a New Family? 

John H. Glenn Jr. 55 Do You Know This Man? John R. Pascal 



BONUS: A MAGAZINE WITHIN A MAGAZINE 



9 Johnny Carson's Corner 

9 There's a World of Music 

11 The Listening Post 

12 Album Reviews 



14 Top 50 Records 

14 Jimmy Dean: Here to Stay! 

15 Joey Dee: Up 'n' Comer 

16 Twist Again 



WHAT'S NEW? WHAT'S UP? 

4 What's New From Coast to Coast. .Eunice Field 

8 Information Booth 74 New Patterns for You 

82 Vote for Your Favorites ! 92 New Designs for Living 



SPECIAL: YOUR MIDWEST FAVORITES 



Millard Hansen 59 One for the Road (WCFL) 

Duane Ellett 60 "Floppy" and the Small Fry (WHO-TV) 

62 Memoirs of the Movies 

Jack Denton 64 A "Live" Wire (WLW-C) 



JACK J. PODELL, Editor-in-Chief 

EUNICE FIELD, West Coast Editor 
TERESA BUXTON, Managing Editor 
LORRAINE BIEAR, Associate Editor 
ANITA ZATT, Assistant to Editor 



CLAIRE SAFRAN, Editor 

JACK ZASORIN, Art Director 
FRANCES MALY, Associate Art Director 
PAT BYRNE, Art Assistant 
BARBARA MARCO, Beauty Editor 



,ii» 




TV Radio Mirror is published monthly by Macfadden Publications, Inc., New York, N. Y. Executive, Adver- 
tising and Editorial Offices at 205 East 42nd St., New York 17, N. Y. Editorial branch office, 434 North Rodeo 
Drive, Beverly Hills, Calif. Gerald A. Bartell, Chairman of the Board and President; Frederick A. Klein, Executive 
Vice President-General Manager; Robert L. Young, Vice President; S. N. Himmelman, Vice President; Lee B. 
Bartell, Secretary. Advertising offices also in Chicago and San Francisco. 

Subscription Rates: In the U.S., its possessions and Canada, one year, $3.00; two years, $5; three years, $7.50. 
All other countries, $5.50 per year. Change of Address: 6 weeks' notice essential. Send your old as well as your 
new address to TV Radio Mirror, 205 E. 42nd St., New York 17, N. Y. 
Manuscripts and Photographs: Publisher cannot be responsible for loss or damage. 

Foreign editions handled through Macfadden Publications International Corp., 205 East 42nd Street, New York 
17, N. Y. Gerald A. Bartell, President; Douglas Lockhart, Vice President. 

Second-class postage paid at New York, N. Y., and other additional post offices. Authorized as second-class 
mail by the Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. Copyright 1962 by Macfadden 
Publications, Inc. All rights reserved. Copyright under the Universal Copyright Convention and International 
Copyright Convention. Copyright reserved under Pan American Copyright Convention. Title trademark registered 
in U.S. Potent Office. Printed in U.S.A. Member of Macfadden Women's Group. 




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WHAT'S NEW 



Sammy and Dino: Shoot for laughs 





Altar-egos: Andy Williams, Claudine — Doug McClure, Barbara. 



Gitte Henning goes to Fabe's head. 



by EUNICE FIELD 



Connie Stevens made the clubs in N.Y.C. with 
elder rock V roll statesman Elvis Presley, then 
returned to Hollywood to start a romance with, of 
all people, Glenn Ford! They even hosted a holi- 
day party together. . . . Lovely Shirley Jones, 
after recovering from motherhood, will star in TV 
version of "Brigadoon." . . . It's not Hugh Downs 
but Johnny Carson who will move into Jack Paar's 
show — if, that is, Johnny can buy his way out of his 
present contract. . . . NBC mighty proud of its 
adaptation of the wonderful comedy, "Arsenic and 
Old Lace." Set for February 5th, starring Boris 
Karloff, with Dorothy Stickney as one of the 
endearing but poisonous sisters. . . . Carol Lynley 
makes the TV scene in a maternity dress on Feb- 
ruary 6th. (Her baby's due any date after that.) 
Along with Cara Williams, Dick Van Dyke and 
Dan Blocker, she will be featured in "The Ameri- 
can Family," comedy skits starring Henry Fonda. 
The show will make laughs about our national pre- 
occupation with statistics. 

Gardner McKay may have lost his best girl, 





ci 




New York fans crowded around Connie Stevens. So did Elvis — until crowded out by Glenn Ford! 



Dolores Hawkins, but he's found a former one, 
Greta Chi. Does Greta know about Gardner's 
New Year's resolution — to definitely get married 
this year? . . . Bob Newhart romancing a N.Y. 
model. . . . Phil Silvers makes the news the hard 
way — with an infected toe. . . . Jim Arness not 
too lonely since his marital split. The "Kitty" in 
his private life is Nora Evans. ... If Father Of The 
Bride comes back next season, which is far from 



a certainty, they will add a baby to the cast. 
Couldn't do it this season. A series takes only six 
months to make and nature can't be rushed. . . . 

Abbe Lane still suing NBC for an ankle injury 
incurred four years ago, but the funniest legal 
wrangle of the season concerns the same net- 
work and one of Hollywood's most famous movie 
queens, Sylvia Sidney. She charges that the 
network, in advertising a Bobby Darin show, 
(Please turn the page) 




Who's doing the Twist? Everybody! Above, Cora Williams. Below, 
Cesar Romero with Mrs. Ray Stark (she's Fanny Brice's daughter). 




w 



WHAT8 NjW 



j£\§ff 



continued 



"ff 



referred to her as the leader of an "all- 
mother" harmonica band and that she 
would appear as such in the show. She 
didn't and claims she never had any 
intention of doing so. . . . Stay home 
the night of February 11th. CBS-TV 
starts off the evening with an hour 
musical, "The Broadway of Lerner and 
Loewe," starring Julie Andrews, Rich- 
ard Burton. Robert Goulet, Maurice 
Chevalier, Stanley Holloway and, of 
course, Alan Lerner and Frederick 
Loewe. This is followed by Theater 
'62 offering a TV adaptation of the 
exciting movie, "Spellbound." . . . 
Side comment: Lerner and Loewe now 
split as a team and this may be the last 
chance of seeing them together. Another 
curious sidenote: Although the Lerner 
and Loewe Broadway shows, the last 
two, have been backed by CBS-TV to 
their profit, the TV show goes to NBC. 

Jane Fonda returns to Manhattan 
in April to do a Broadway show, which 
will make Tony Perkins happy. . . . 
Clu Gulager observes, "It's amazing 
how many things a girl can do without 
before she's married." . . . Bus Stop 
appears doomed so perhaps Rock Hud- 
son is merely consoling Marilyn Max- 
well. All this talk of a serious romance 
is pure nonsense. Absolutely. . . . The 
19-year-old beauty Patty Harmon, 
hostess on the new Groucho Marx show, 
had a funny thing happen to her on 
the way to the studio. She lost her real 
first name, Joy. Sponsor Lever Brothers 
didn't like her bearing the name of a 
Procter & Gamble "child." 

Bobby Rydell twists with caution. 
Having more bad luck these days with 
minor injuries. After a picture session 
in Central Park, he rushed to the doc- 
tor's. Got bit by a squirrel. Next time 
he'll bring his own nuts. . . . Miss Show- 
Business finally makes the scene Feb- 
ruary 25th. Judy Garland, who hasn't 
been seen on TV since 1956, comes on 
with a big variety, assisted by Frank 
Sinatra and Dean Martin. Kay 
Thompson will be creative consultant. 



Robert Young gains a son when 
daughter Barbara marries Tom Beebe 
this June. . . . Rod Serling planning 
a movie version of Twilight Zone. . . . 
Legit composer Gian-Carlo Menotti 
will be among those paying tribute to 
Louis Armstrong on the forthcoming 
Ed Sullivan special. Menotti was by the 
great jazzman's side in Rome when 
Louis nearly died. . . . Explanation of 
Pat Boone's scarcity on the TV scene 
explained by his asking price for a guest 
appearance: $30,000. But Pat has 
caught himself a plum in the upcoming 




New York wants Edie Adams, but 
so does Ernie Kovacs — close to him ! 



film "Maria." Nancy Kwan will be 
his leading lady. . . . Ricky Powell. 
son of Dick, has turned over his earn- 
ings for working on daddy's show to 
the John Thomas Dyes School, burned 
to the ground during the Bel Air fire. 
. Dick Powell, himself, turning 
philosophical. He notes that he doesn't 
like to watch his old movies on TV. 
commenting, "I was never that young 
or thin." 

When Cain's Hundred was set till 
spring, its star, Mark Richman, cele- 
brated by going to a Chinese restau- 
rant. He bit into a fortune cookie, lost 



half a tooth and repairs came to 
The message in the cookie? "You 
have expensive tastes." . . . Imported 
for "Two Weeks in Another Town," 
Italian dish Rossana Schiaflnno 
wore a full-length chinchilla for the 
"West Side Story" premiere while her 
date, Dick Chamberlain, sported a 
fancy-Dan tux. Coming out of the 
theater, Dick was rushed by seven teen 
girls. Afraid he might lose his tux to 
the souvenir-collectors, he ran faster 
than Dr. Kildare in an emergency. . . . 
They want Edie Adams in New York 
for the Today show, but it's a mighty 
long commute from her Hollywood 
home with Ernie Kovacs. 

CBS bulging with mail protesting the 
coming departure of Dennis Weaver. 
Dennis slated for his own hour musical- 
variety series in the fall. So far, no 
word on whether Marshal Dillon will 
get a new deputy or try to make it 
without. . . . Canny as well as bonny, 
Myrna Fahey put down her ticker- 
tape long enough to buy a 15-unit apart- 
ment house. She did it up pink and 
will manage. . . . For Goodness Sake: 
Why is it so much more enjoyable to 
be bad? When Eliot Ness (Bob 
Stack) turned hood in a recent Un- 
touchables, he took wife Rosemarie out 
on the town to celebrate . . . and Barry 
Sullivan got jealous and demanded a 
reprieve from his goodie role in Tall 
Man in order to play a baddie in Tar- 
get: The Corruptors. (P.S. NBC 
wouldn't give it to him ! ) And Jeff 
Morrow, hero of Union Pacific, chimes 
in with this "for instance." A kid came 
running to his pal's shouting, "I got 
a whole box of bombers for Christmas." 
Said a pal, "Gee, now you can bomb the 
Russians!" Yelled the kid ecstatically, 
"Russians, nothin' . . . now I can bomb 
evvybody ! " 

Since the start of Dobie Gillis, 
Dwayne Hickman and Tuesday 
Weld were said to be feuding. So how 
come those dinner dates in dim dine- 
and-dance spots? And how come, when 
Dwayne came down with the virus, 
Tuesday was on hand to soothe the 
fevered brow on Mondays, Wednesdays 
and Fridays? . . . Mourns Brett Hal- 
sey, "I got to be a success!" And let's 
face it, he has got to, what with alimony 
to two ex-wives, plus support for three 
kiddies, and a yen to get hitched again 
to Debbie Loew, ex of Tyrone Power 
and Nico Minardos. . . . Well, well, 
well! With the help of a forked willow 
branch, Barton MacLane is said to 
have brought in (Continued on page 71) 




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V : 



Anne Francis 



8m{?®[?ooo(o]tf8®ijo 





Gd®®OGd 



Mary Murphy 



All About Anne 

Please tell me what you can about 
the actress Anne Francis. 

P.K., San Francisco, Calif. 

Though pretty; blue-eyed, blonde 
Anne Francis looks as sweet and whole- 
some as the girl next door, her on- 
screen roles — both in movies and on TV 
— have been anything but that. She has 
played a delinquent teenager, an al- 
coholic mistress, a gun moll, a woman 
of intrigue, and a prostitute. As a mat- 
ter of fact, she herself says: "I've 
played a prostitute three times and, 
each time, my career has picked up 
noticeably." Anne has no objection to 
playing nice-girl roles, however, and 
has done such on many TV shows, in- 
cluding Twilight Zone, Wagon Train, 
and The New Breed. ... A native of 
Ossining, New York, she began her 
career as a child model. By the time 
she was seven, she was a regular on 
radio and, at 11, appeared on Broad- 
way. . . . The actress married Bamlet L. 
Price Jr., a producer of documentary 
films, in 1952 and divorced him in 1955. 
She is now married to Dr. R. D. Abel- 
off, a Los Angeles dentist. 

Too Much Mike 

Dear Editors: 

How come all we ever read about is 
Michael Landon? Not that I don't like 
him, I do very much, but I also like the 
other three on Bonanza and would like 
to read something about them for a 
change. 

M.A.P., Palmyra, N.J. 



You're in luck. Just turn to page 46. 
—Ed. 

Some Quickies 

/ would like to know if Lawrence 
Tierney and Scott Brady are the sarrie 
person? 

J.A.E., Pontiac, III. 

Scott and Lawrence are brothers. 
—Ed. 

Please tell me if Mitch Miller is 
married and to whom? 

M.L.R., Norman, Oklahoma 

Mitch has been conducting a marital 
duet with Frances Alexander for 25 
years. — Ed. 

/ know that George Sanders and Tom 
Conway are brothers, but which one 
uses the real surname? 

M.C., Philadelphia, Pa. 

George uses the real family name. — 
Ed. 

Please tell me how old James Mc- 
Arthur is. 

V.H., Trotwood, Ohio 

James is twenty-three years old. — Ed. 

Can you please tell me where and 
when Lee Patterson was born? 

N.M.B., Erie, Pa. 

Lee was born March 31, 1929, in 
Vancouver, B.C., Canada. — Ed. 

Meet Mary 

What can you tell me about the 
actress Mary Murphy? 

J. A. Z., Little Rock, Arkansas 

Believe it or not, pretty and vivacious 
Mary Murphy was discovered for the 
movies while eating lunch at a Holly- 



wood drugstore counter! This hap- 
pened while Mary was on a lunch break 
from an exclusive Beverly Hills de- 
partment store. Not long after, she 
made her debut in a Bob Hope picture, 
and has gone on, since then, to nu- 
merous roles in practically every tele- 
vision series and a regular one on CBS- 
TV's The Investigators. ... A blue- 
eyed brunette, Mary has two ambitions 
— to do a Broadway play and "to see 
the rest of the world I haven't seen." 
She likes ice skating, horseback riding, 
tennis, swimming, abstract painting 
(water colors and oils) and reading. 
. . . Mary received an annulment of her 
marriage to TV actor Dale Robertson, 
whom she married on June 3, 1956. 

Calling All Fans 

The following fan clubs invite new 
members. If you are interested, write 
to address given — not to TV Radio 
Mirror. 

Shelley Fabares Fan Club, Madeline 
Bennett, 2832 Orange Ave., La Cres- 
centa, California. 

Norma Zimmer Fan Club, Frances 
Young, 1604 E. Susquehanna St., Allen- 
town, Pa. 

Crosby Brothers Fan Club, Priscilla 
Koernig, 349 Banks St., San Francisco 
10, Calif. 

Mark Richman Fan Club, Louis Kief, 
39165 L'Anse Creuse, Mt. Clemens, 
Mich. 



Write to Information Booth, TV Radio Mirror, 
205 E. 42nd St., New York 17, N.Y. We regret 
we cannot answer or return unpublished letters. 




ON THE RECORD 



MARCH 1962 



Don Mills 
Music Editor 



THERE'S A WORLD 
OF MUSIC 

• Music travels fast — and far — these 
days. The Twist is just as big in France 
now as in the United States . . . Ray 
Charles is France's best selling jazz 
artist . . . Yves Montand now has his 
own show on Broadway and a batch 
of highly popular LPs . . . One of the 
biggest hits last year was "Calcutta" 
. . . Another big one was "Wooden 
Heart," first a hit in Germany . . . Bob 
Moore's "Mexico" is a top favorite . . . 
Connie Francis last year had the num- 
ber one record in five or six different 
countries ... So did Ricky Nelson and 
Paul Anka . . . The story of the hit 
Broadway musical "Milk and Honey" 
takes place in Israel . . . Record com- 
panies are sending their talent scouts on 
world, or at least European, tours . . . 
Now in England's top 10 are Elvis Pres- 
ley, Bobby Vee, Dave Brubeck and 
Jimmy Dean. 

These facts all point up the increas- 
ing global aspect of the music business. 
It certainly will affect the kind of music 
you will be hearing in the years to come. 
As record companies become more con- 
scious of the world market for Ameri- 
can records and the tit-for-tat popularity 
of foreign artists here, they'll release 
more and more "global flavored" music. 

Here is the way one record company 
capsules its world-wide strategy: "The 
rest of the world is just as important 
to us as our own country and we are 
doing everything we can to maximize 
the overseas market. 

"We are working with our artists," 
says an official of Reprise Records, "so 
that they will cut tracks in many lan- 
guages to ensure easy world distribu- 
tion. Our comedians are being asked to 
record material of universal signifi- 
cance." 

Frank Sinatra, who owns the Reprise 
label, is planning a television spectac- 
ular filmed in London, but designed 
for world screening. Affiliates of Re- 
prise in different countries will help 
(Please turn the page) 



Johnny 

Carson's 

Corner 



• Around the TV and record world — 
and probably around yours, too — the 
cliches fly through the air as though 
they were on a regular schedule and 
jet-propelled. For instance, you haven't 
seen a gent for a couple of years, and 
you never did know him very well. 
Suddenly, you meet again. The first 
thing he says is, "How's it going?" 
You don't know exactly what it he's 
talking about, so you half-smile and 
say, "Fine." He follows with "That's 
good." Momentous information has 
been exchanged ... or has it? All 
these phrases are so meaningless, but 
the one that fractures me no little is 
the man who backs up his opinion 
with, "You know what they say." Who 
they are nobody knows — or cares. 

Oscar Wilde once said, "Whenever 
people talk to me about the weather, I 
always feel certain that they mean 
something else." He must have had a 




certain TV producer in mind when he 
wrote that. You can come in from the 
street in 20° weather, your eyes red, 
your nose running, and that shaking 
you're doing is not the Twist. This 
creative genius hits you with the ques- 
tion, "Is it cold enough for you?" 

It should put the lid on cliches to 
remember what happened to another 
Oscar — this one named Levant. He was 
greeted with "You look wonderful." 
Oscar had had a recent look in the 
mirror, to confirm the way he felt. 
"What do you mean, I look wonderful," 
he growled. "I feel terrible; I haven't 
slept in days; I ache all over and my 
doctor has me on three kinds of seda- 
tion." His friend fled into the night. 

All of which goes to say: Unless 
you're on a psychiatrist's couch at the 
time, don't take a cliche lying down! 

As the cliche goes, we're happy to 
say Johnny will be with us every month! 




OJV THE RECORD 



There's A World Of Music 

{Continued from page 9) 



pick their top local artists to be in- 
cluded in the film. Sinatra is also plan- 
ning to release an LP of "Great Songs 
from Great Britain." 

Chubby Checker has been busy re- 
recording the Twist in different lan- 
guages for overseas distribution, a fact 
that may point to a future state when 
record talent men will ask a potential 
artist if he's multi-lingual before they 
ask if he can sing. 

Mercury Records, which is now 
owned by a European firm, Philips, has 
sent three artist-and-repertoire men on 
European tours in recent months. One 
of the artists they are considering is 
Johnny Halliday, top rock 'n' roll singer 
in France and sometimes called "the 



Ave a go wiv the Busker; 




!;,;^Sff@ 



A "different" musical experience, to say 
trie lesfit 

RAINY NIGHT IN TOKYO (Capi- 
tol T 10287)— This LP offers tradition- 
al Japanese instruments such as the 
samisen and the koto blending with 
modern orchestral arrangements of 
melodies that are part of Japan's long 
heritage. 

MIRIAM MAKEBA (RCA Victor 
LPM-2267)— Though she released this 
LP over a year ago, this talented singer 
from Johannesburg is still the greatest 
interpreter of South African music. In- 
troduced to this country by Harry Bela- 
fonte, she is now a star in her own right. 

SWEDEN'S ROLLICKING OJEBO- 
KOREN (Capitol T 10294)— This cho- 




French Elvis Presley." Mercury says it 
plans to keep its A&R men up-to-date 
on foreign music trends by allowing 
them to view the situation first hand. 

Reasons for the widening market 
for American recording artists are 
many. Here are some: More G.I.s and 
American tourists are in Europe, and 
the Armed Forces Radio Network airs 
much popular American music, with 
an estimated audience of nearly 50 
million. (And Soviet Russia now beams 
a nightly radio show on AFN's fre- 
quency after it signs off, playing Ameri- 
can records mixed in with propaganda 
information from "Moscow Molly.") 

American movies are now given 
world-wide distribution. Elvis Presley's 
"Blue Hawaii" movie is being eagerly 
awaited in most foreign countries and, 
meanwhile, sales of his "Blue Hawaii" 



LP. from Norway to Australia, are 
soaring. 

More -artists are making regional or 
world-wide tours. Bobby Rydell is cur- 
rently on a tour of the Far East and 
recently was scheduled to play in 
Hong Kong, one of the few American 
artists to do so for quite a while. 

Record firms are not overlooking our 
taste for music of many lands. Capitol 
and RCA Victor have regular series of 
international music. Smaller labels have 
found it profitable to concentrate on the 
music of one country. Monitor Records 
has a fine catalogue of Russian folk 
music and some classical artists, and 
Fiesta Records has a well-received 
series featuring different countries, such 
as "I Remember Greece," "I Remember 
France," etc. In fact, most record firms 
are trying to include foreign music of 
one kind or another in their list of 
available LPs. 

Of the new releases, here are some 
that give you an idea of how easy it 
is to travel via music: 

CUADRO FLAMENCO! Los Maca- 
renos (Capitol T 10301) — subtitled 
"Andalusian Classics by Spanish Gyp- 
sies Recorded in Barcelona," this LP 
presents the authentic Spanish gypsy 
music we know as flamenco. All the ex- 
citement and color of a gay fiesta is 
here. 

AVE A GO WIV THE BUSKERS 
(RCA Victor FPM 104)— The Buskers 
are Cockney street singers and musi- 
cians, and their distinctive songs, some 
bawdy, some sentimental, are still in- 
telligible to the average American ear. 




rus of about two dozen singers, ranging 
in age from 15 to 25, are non-profes- 
sionals who get together for the joy of 
singing. Their youthful, vibrant voices 
present some of the lilting, traditional 
songs of Sweden, melodies that can be 
hummed in any language. 

AN ENGLISH MUSIC HALL 
(Capitol T 10273)— This one goes back 
to London of an earlier day, with daffy 
ditties and beery ballads warbled by 
six soloists, Four Singing Waiters, plus 
a medley rendered by the full com- 
pany! You're invited to join in, just 
as granddaddy did. Sort of a "sing- 
along" of the gaslit era? 

There's no limit to how far you can 
travel by armchair and hi-fi in the 
world of music. Who knows, records 
might eventually replace travel folders 
for armchair globe-trotters. 



19 



THE LISTENING POST 





Good news! Judy does it again. 

Broadway shows are better — or 
at least more popular — than ever this 
year. The original cast albums, of 
course, are almost guaranteed best sell- 
ers. But this year many record firms 
are also producing popular instrumen- 
tal or jazz versions of the hit Broad- 
way musicals. "How to Succeed in 
Business Without Really Trying" is 
given the big band treatment by Ray 
Ellis for RCA Victor, and a jazz ver- 
sion by the Gary McFarland orchestra 
on Verve. Stan Kenton's version of 
"West Side Story" on Capitol is already 
a hit LP. "Kwamina," which folded 
shortly after it opened, has been jazz- 
styled by Billy Taylor on Mercury, and 
similar treatment has been given to 



"Milk and Honey" by Charlie Shavers 
and Wild Bill Davis on Everest. The 
"Subways Are for Sleeping" score by 
Jule Styne has been jazzed up by Dave 
Gruson on Columbia, and the McGuire 
Sisters have a pop treatment on Coral. 

Les Paul and Mary Ford, the popular 
guitar-vocal team, have a new LP in 
the works for Columbia titled "Kinda 
Dreamy." Les and Mary have been play- 
ing one-nighters for the last five months 
in the Midwest at rodeos and fairs. 
When they checked into San Francis- 
co's Fairmont Hotel for an engagement, 
their three-year-old daughter Colleen 
looked in awe around the plush hotel 
lobby, finally said: "Where're all the 
horsies?" 

Capitol is not resting on Judy Gar- 
land's laurels. They've just released a 
follow-up to her smash "Judy at Car- 
negie Hall." 

Keeping the record straight: Bobby 
Darin and Sandra Dee said all along — 
for nine straight months — that they'd 
have a boy, and sure enough they did. 
Named him Dodd Mitchell. Bobby's also 
got a new hit single, called "Multipli- 
cation." . . . Shortly after ABC-Para- 
mount released "The Best of Andy 
Williams," French dancer Claudine 
Longet married all of him . . . 

Al Hirt is not only arranging the 



theme song "Al Di La" for Warner 
Bros.' movie, "Lovers Must Learn," 
but also co-starring with Troy Dona- 
hue and Suzanne Pleshette. 

Ground swells indicate that the next 
dance craze for the younger set — now 
that the Twist has been taken over by 
adults — will be the Surfer's Stomp. 

Newcomer Timi Yuro appeared with 
Frank Sinatra on his recent Australian 
tour. . . . Look for the next big pop 
movie theme to be "Tender Is the 
Night" — over six different versions have 
been recorded. 

Singles records are staying around 
longer than they used to. Not long ago, 
six weeks was about the life of a pop 




Patti Page is still a rage — two ways. 



Music's easy for Les Paul, Mary Ford, but a child's question stumps 'em. 



tune, but now 12 to 16 weeks seems 
average. Chubby's "Twist" currently 
has been on the charts longest — 30 
weeks. 

Patti Page, who hasn't had a pop 
hit for a spell, is pretty sure of a big 
one in her current "Go On Home" for 
Mercury. And yet, in her second movie 
assignment, "Boy's Night Out" for 
MGM, she plays a straight dramatic 
role. . . . Dodie Stevens has a role in 
Allied Artists' "Reprieve," starring Ben 
Gazzara, Sammy Davis Jr., and Rod 
Steiger. . . . Elvis' next one is "Kid 
Galahad" for United Artists. 



11 




OAf THE RECORD 



\Touir Monthly ON RECORD Guide? 



POPULAR 

•••Andy Williams' Best (Cadence 
3054) — This is just what the title says 
— a collection of Andy's best sellers. 
And an impressive group of songs it is. 
Andy shows again on this set that he's 
one of the most accomplished pop sing- 
ers around, appealing to both the teen 
set and adults. Included are "Canadian 
Sunset," "The Bilbao Song," "Butter- 
fly," "Are You Sincere," "The Ha- 
waiian Wedding Song," and seven 
others. 




SPOKEN WORD 

•••The World Of Dorothy Park- 
er (Verve 15029)— Those who have 
not read any of Dorothy Parker's in- 
cisive poems, phrases of dazzling wit, 
or short stories full of compassion and 
le mot juste should hurry to the nearest 
bookstore, and those who have not 
heard her doing these things should 
hurry to the nearest record store. Par- 
ticularly delightful is her reading of an 
Esquire book review of Zsa Zsa Gabor's 
as-told-to autobiography. A gem. 

SPECIAL 

•••Events & N.Y. Export: Op. 
Jazz, from Jerome Robbins' "Ballets: 

U.S.A." (Robert Prince, composer) 
(RCA Victor LPM-2435 ) —Ballet, and 
particularly jazz ballet, has become 
quite popular in the last few years, 



thanks mainly to television. Foremost 
of the TV choreographers is Jerome 
Robbins, who has staged some of the 
biggest and best productions in show 
business, including "West Side Story," 
TV's "Peter Pan," and the Ethel Mer- 
man—Mary Martin TV spectacular of 
several years ago. The development of 
jazz ballet, mostly on TV, has produced 
a new music to go along with it. These 
two exciting examples of it, composed 
by Robert Prince, for Robbins' perma- 
nent ballet company, are what could be 
called pictorial music: it's easy to im- 
agine choreography to accompany the 
music. This is contemporary music, as 
current as today's newspaper. In fact, 
Prince says of "Events" that it de- 
picts the fantastic confusion the ordi- 
nary day holds for everyone, "the total 
effect is that of reading the morning 
newspaper." 

JAZZ 

•••Closeup Ir. Swing, Erroll Gar- 
ner (ABC-Paramount 395)— Often re- 
ferred to as an individualist in jazz. 
Erroll Garner displays here the reason 
for this estimate. His creative genius 
is poured into every improvisation, mak- 
ing of simple melody like "All of Me'* 
or "I'm in the Mood for Love" an ex- 
tended variation on the theme that is 
akin to a symphonic suite. And yet, as 
the title suggests, he swings. Two of his 
own compositions are included here, 
plus eight well-known standards. Each, 
in his hands, gains a special life of its 



sum* 





MOVIE MUSIC 

••El Cid, Miklos Rosza (MGM 
E-3977) — All the pageantry and splen- 
dor of the film, which deals with a 
medieval Spanish hero, has been cap- 
tured in this superior musical score, 
composed and conducted by Miklos 
Rozsa, whose score for "Ben Hur" won 
an Academy Award. He is also repre- 
sented musically on local screens by 
"King of Kings," thus qualifying as an 
epic expert. 

FOLK MUSIC 

•••Bob Gibson And Bob Camp 
At The Gate Of Horn (Electra 207) 
— All kinds of wonderfully strange and 
nutty things seem to happen in base- 
ment night clubs, and many of our new 
artists, such as Mort Sahl and the King- 
ston Trio, have come from these show 
business incubators. Bob Gibson has 
been gathering a loyal following for the 
past few years with his unusual mate- 
rial, and here, with Bob Camp at the 
original Gate of Horn (which humorist 
Shel Silverstein delineates riotously in 
the liner notes), Gibson keeps the audi- 
ence laughing with some deliciously 
pungent satire, of folk singing as well 
as other aspects of our culture. "The 
Thinking Man" alone is worth the price 
of the album. 

•••Martha Schlamme In Con- 
cert (MGM E-3978)— Such a versatile, 
and talented artist as Martha Schlamme 
is a joy to hear. Though she is here 



12 



-MC-M< GREAT! 
-+C~MC GOOO LISTENING 



-K~K FAIP* SOUNDS 
~K tlTS YOUR MONEY" 



catalogued as a folk singer, her appeal 
is much wider in scope — in fact, inter- 
national. She goes far beyond the aver- 
age folk singer in range and appeal of 
her material, and reworks every song, 
be it a song of war sung in French, 
Yiddish, or Russian, or a love ballad 
of a girl entranced by the Russian cav- 
alry or of a girl who waters her garden 
with wine. Her sense of the dramatic, 
that is, her concern for the meaning of 
her songs, indeed puts her in a cate- 
gory all her own. And her choice of 
material from many lands tends to 
prove once again, in song, that men and 
women have the same concerns — love 
and death — the world over. 




•Connie Francis Sings Folk Song 
Favorites (MGM E-3969)— This set of 
tried and true folk cliches will probably 
appeal to Connie Francis fans, but folk 
music fans shoirld look elsewhere for a 
chance to broaden their musical hori- 
zons. Selections range from the trite 
"Oh Suzanna" to the shop-worn "On 
Top of Old Smokey." 

BAND MUSIC 

••The Spectacular Sound Of Sou- 

sa, Paul Lavalle (MGM E-3976)— La- 
valle has become known as the band- 
master of America, and his faithful 
treatment of Sousa's most stirring march 
tunes will be a treat for "march around 
the breakfast table" fans. The recording 
is high quality and the coloration of 
the brass comes through loud and clear. 



CLASSICAL 

•••Keyboard Giants Of The 
Past, various artists (RCA Victor LM- 
2585) — Victor has dug into its vaults 
and come up with a collection of its 
great pianists, ranging from Paderew- 
ski, recorded in 1923, to William Kapell. 
1951. It's rewarding to be able to com- 
pare the styles of these giants of the past 
on one recording. Included are three 
selections that have not been available 
before on LP — de Pachmann recording 
Chopin's "Impromptu in F-Sharp": 
Harold Bauer and Ossip Gabrilowitsch. 
Arensky's "Waltz"; and Mischa Levit- 
zki performing his own "Arabesque Val- 
sante." A superior collection for piano- 
philes. 

•••The Incomparable Birgit Nils- 
son (RCA Victor LM-2578)— This is 
the first time Madame Nilsson has re- 
corded a song recital and the results 
are excellent. She has chosen songs of 
Schubert, Wagner, Strauss, Sibelius and 
Grieg, including his famous "I Love 
Thee," to which she seems to bring a 
new dimension. 

TEEN 

••. . . And Now About Mr. Ava- 
loh, Frankie Avalon (Chancellor 5022) 
— 21-year-old Frankie has progressed in 
his career and in his singing compe- 
tence to be put into the Popular, rather 
than Teen category. But certainly the 
bulk of his fans are still in the younger 
set. He projects a nice warm quality 
here, singing with a showmanship ac- 









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quired by working before night-club 
audiences. His voice does not yet have 
the power or certainty needed to carry 
some of the notes, but this he may im- 
prove upon with time. 

••Johnny Tillotson's Best (Ca- 
dence 3052) — Johnny has had several 
big singles hits and this, his first LP. 
should have great appeal for his teen- 
age fans. He sings with a clean-cul 
quality that's refreshing. 




••Bobby Vee (Liberty 3211) — 
Bobby is in top form on this set. He 
sings his recent "Run to Him," "Walk- 
in' With My Angel," and the smash 
"Take Good Care of My Baby." He has 
a new sureness of tone and phrasing 
here that shows he's gaining pro 
status. 

••$1,000,000 Worth of Twang, 
Vol. II, Dwayne Eddy (Jamie 70-3021) 
— Dwayne's first volume with this title 
proved highly successful and this 
second set is his best yet. He strides 
right into some of his previous singles 
with his driving guitar and rhythm sec- 
tion. Included are "Pepe," "Drivin' 
Home" and "Gidget Goes Hawaiian." 

••This is Vic Dana, (Dolton 2013) 
— As soon as Vic's debut single, "Little 
Altar Boy," started to catch hold, Dol- 
ton issued this first LP, a collection of 
ballads done with tenderness and 
surprising vocal control. Though this 
LP is perhaps premature, Vic Dana has 
a future and will be heard from again. 



13 




ON THE RECORD 



HERE TO STAY! 

Jimmy Dean 

• Jimmy Dean's biggest hit to date has 
been "Big Bad John," which estab- 
lishes him once and for all as a pop 
singer to be reckoned with. Previously 
he had some success for Columbia Rec- 
ords in the country music field. 

Born 32 years ago on a farm outside 
Plainview, Texas, Jimmy began his 
musical career at the age of 10, first 
learning to play piano, then mastering 
the accordion and guitar. His musical 
career started when he was in the Air 
Force, filling in as replacement with a 
group of service buddies who called 
themselves the Tennessee Haymakers 
and sang country songs during off-duty 
hours in Washington, D. C, base bars 
for $5 a night. 

In 1952 he was hired to perform for 
U. S. troops in the Caribbean, after 
which he returned to Washington for 
appearances on radio and TV. In 1957 
he had a network TV show on CBS. 

But his emergence as a pop singer 
four years later is due partly to the 
fact that the record buying public is 
now accepting more country-Western 
artists. His Columbia LP, titled "Big 
Bad John," has proven to be a big seller. 
Jimmy's most recent single release is 
an unusual recitation which he wrote, 
addressed to "Dear Ivan." Emotion- 
packed and in a patriotic vein, this 
looks like another solid seller for Jimmy. 

There is no doubt that Jimmy Dean, 
after a musical career that spans 21 
years, has finally found his public. 





mm. Cm W4F W^ mm !■#' 



^Hottest LPs! The Twist, with a wide choice of LPs on the 
market. Most notable are: The Twist, Chubby Checker (Parkway 
7001). Your Twist Party, Checker (Parkway 7007), Doin' the Twist 
at the Peppermint Lounge, Joey Dee & His Starliters (Roulette 
25166), For Twisters Only, Checker (Parkway 7002), Do the Twist 
With Ray Charles (Atlantic 8054). (Also see page 16.) 



On the Record's monthly survey of the hottest new LPs 
and singles lists those records showing the strongest sales 
in retail stores, based on reports from manufacturers, 
distributors, trade publications — including Bill Gavin 
Record Reports, Billboard Music Week, Cashbox, and 
Variety. 



BEST SELLING NEW LPs: 

West Side Story, Sound Track (Columbia OL 5670)— Music of the 
film version of this outstanding Broadway musical continues to enthrall. 
Milk and Honey, Original Cast (RCA Victor LOC 1065)— This melo- 
dious story of American widows in Israel, the land of milk and honey, 
stars Robert Weede and Mimi Benzel. 

How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying, Original 
Cast (RCA Victor LOC 1066) — Robert Morse stars in this tuneful spoof 
of big business. 

Chubby Checker— Bobby Rydell (Cameo 1013) — Two of show busi- 
ness' hottest new artists team up in a pro session that moves along at a 
brisk pace, showing off their versatility and spontaneous good humor. 
Sail Away, Original Cast (Capitol WAO 1643) — Noel Coward's magic 
touch has produced a musical that sails along as long as Elaine Stritch 
is on stage. 

Joan Baez, Vol. II (Vanguard 9094) — A soft but lyrical voice gives full 
meaning to some less popularized folk ballads. 

West Side Story, Stan Kenton (Capitol 1609) — An exciting Afro-Cuban 
jazz version by the master of progressive sounds. 

King of Kings, Original Movie Music (MGM 1E2) — The musical score 
of the Biblical epic as composed and conducted by Miklos Rozsa. 
Brothers Four Song Book (Columbia CL 1697) — A bright and happy 
sing-along with the quartet pulling some old chestnuts out of the fire. 
Best of the Dukes of Dixieland (Audio Fidelity 1956)— All the 
familiar Dixie tunes are here, served up in rousing fashion by this un- 
inhibited group. 

Ella in Hollywood, Ella Fitzgerald (Verve 4052) — Her unassailable 
work is highly evident on this session which brings the art of singing to a 
point close to perfection. 

Let There Be Drums, Sandy Nelson (Imperial 9159)— This 21-year-old 
drummer, now with a current hit single, treats the drum like a musical 
instrument that sings with emotion. 

Flower Drum Song, Sound Track (Decca 9098) — Music from the movie 
version, a pale copy of the original Broadway show, but still full of the 
same delightful melodies. 

Kean, Original Cast (Columbia KOL 5720) — The hit Broadway show 
with Alfred Drake starring in a tour de force role as the famed swash- 
buckling British actor. 

Time Further Out, Dave Brubeck (Columbia CL 1690) — An excellent 
followup to his hit LP, "Time Out," with lots of surprises in store for 
finger-snappers and toe-tappers. 



14 



OF THE MONTH 



• Hottest Single! CAN'T HELP FALLING IN LOVE, ROCK- 
A-HULA BABY, Elvis Presley (RCA Victor)— From his movie "Blue 
Hawaii" come these two top sides, the first a moving ballad, and 
the second an up-tempo "twist." 



HOT SINGLES: 

The Lion Sleeps Tonight, The Tokens (RCA Victor)— The Wimoweh 
folk ballad in modern dress has universal appeal, one of Victor's biggest 
sellers in quite a while. 

Baby It's You, The Shirelles (Scepter) — This group's best effort in the 
rhythm-blues field since "Tonight's the Night." 

Peppermint Twist, Joey Dee & the Starliters (Roulette) — Here's the 
group from the Peppermint Lounge, riding the crest of a national pub- 
licity wave. 

When the Boy in Your Arms, Connie Francis (MGM) — Another 
warm vocal by this popular stylist. 

Unchain My Heart, Ray Charles (ABC) — Ray has another hit, singing 
in his inimitable soulful way. 

Revenge, Brook Benton (Mercury) — Brook has a liquid, flowing way 
with a song. 

The Wanderer/The Majestic, Dion (Laurie) — A two-sided hit for 
this teen artist who's gained stature since he went on his own. 
When I Fall in Love, The Lettermen (Capitol) — A sound followup to 
their first smash, "The Way You Look Tonight." 

Jambalaya, Fats Domino (Imperial) — This oldie gets good treatment 
in Fats' hands. 

Multiplication/Irresistible You, Bobby Darin (Atco) — He's in the 
groove for a two-sided hit. 

Pocketful of Miracles, Frank Sinatra (Reprise) — A delightful song in 
the tradition of Frank's charming "High Hopes." 

Turn On Your Love Light, Bobby Bland (Duke) — A great shouting 
blues delivered a la Ray Charles. 

Dear Lady Twist, Gary U. S. Bonds (Legrand) — Another version of 
the twist, served up by this popular teen artist. 

Small Sad Sam, Phil McLean (Versatile) — A very funny take-off from 
Jimmy Dean's "Big Bad John." 

HOT POP CONTENDERS: 

I Know, Barbara George (AFO). 

Funny How Time Slips Away, Jimmy Elledge (RCA Victor). 

Poor Fool, Ike & Tina Turner (Sue). 

If You Gotta Make A Fool of Somebody, James Ray (Caprice). 

Norman, Sue Thompson (Hickory). 

A Little Bitty Tear, Burl Ives (Decca) . 

Twist-Her, Bill Black's Combo (Hi) . 

Flying Circle, Frank Slay (Swan). 

Letter Full of Tears, Gladys Knight (Fury). 

Do-Re-Mi, Lee Dorsey, (Fury). 

Go On Home, Patti Page (Mercury). 

And Then Came Love, Ed Townsend (Challenge). 

Dear Ivan, Jimmy Dean (Columbia). 

Happy Jose, Dave Appel (Cameo), Jack Ross (Dot). 

I'm Blue, The Ikettes (Atco). 

Your Ma Said You Cried in Your Sleep Last Night, Kenny Dino 

(Musicor). 

Surfer's Stomp, The Mar-Kets (Union). 

Percolator, Billy Joe & the Checkmates (Dore). 

I Told the Brook, Marty Robbins (Columbia). 

Shimmy Shimmy Walk, The Megatons (Dodge). 




UP 'N' COMER: 

Joey Dee 

• Joey Dee's rapid rise to stardom is 
due to a Twist of fate. It's well-known 
to most by now that Joey Dee and His 
Starliters is the group from the Pep- 
permint Lounge in New York, where 
the Twist craze got its start. 

Dee was born in 1940 in Passaic. 
N. J. He has five sisters and three 
brothers ranging in age from 17 to 42. 
His group, the Starliters, consists of 
Carlton Latimor, organist, age 22; Wil- 
lie Davis, drummer, 21 ; and Larry Ver- 
nieri and David Brigati, both 21 and 
singers and dancers. They've been to- 
gether for three years, with one year at 
the Peppermint Lounge. 

Signed with Roulette immediately 
after national publicity broke around 
them, the group now has a top Twist 
single, and their LP, "Doing the Twist 
at the Peppermint Lounge." is also high 
in popularity. 

At the beginning of the year, their 
first feature film was released, "Hey. 
Let's Twist," which tells the story of 
how the fad started. 

Two more films are set for Paramount 
and a national tour will keep the boys 
busy until they return to the Pepper- 
mint Lounge. 

The 21-year-old singer also has an 
LP released on the Scepter label, which 
ties in the Twist phenomenon. Dee was 
under contract to Scepter before the 
Twist was discovered by Cafe Society. 

Although there has been much com- 
petition from all sides to cash in on the 
dance fad, Joey Dee and Chubby Check- 
er seem to share the lead — though the 
whisper at the Peppermint Lounge is 
that they don't really like sharing it. It's 
a close rivalry that's making for hot 
music. 






15 







OM THE RECORD 




CHECKER & RYDELL 
PACK A ONE-TWO HIT PUNCH 



• If two heads are better than one, 
two top recording stars are also better 
than one. This was the thinking of 
Cameo-Parkway Records when they 
decided to get their two star performers 
together in a studio to cut an LP, 
"Your Hits and Mine" (Cameo 1013). 

The timing was perfect. Bobby Ry- 
dell, who for a long time has been a 
leen-age favorite, was being recognized 
as a bright new talent for television and 
night clubs. He had appeared on the 
Jack Benny and Red Skelton shows, 
with other shows in the offing, and had 
appeared with George Burns in his 
night club act, and broken" in his own 
act at New York's Copacabana. 

Chubby Checker, who entered show 
business imitating an established star, 
Fats Domino (in fact, patterning his 
■stage name after him), had just found 
himself the center of the biggest pub- 
licity break of his or nearly any other 
performer's career. When the Twist 
caught the fancy of Cafe Society, Chub- 
by's two-year-old recording of it had al- 
ready enjoyed better-than-average suc- 
cess with the teen set and there still 
seemed to be continuing interest in his 



three Twist LPs. Almost overnight (in 
show business terms) Chubby's Twist 
records were the most sought after 
records around. 

Teaming two artists on one record 
does not insure success. Bobby Darin 
and Johnny Mercer tried a short time 
ago and nothing happened. But Chubby 
and Bobby, in addition to having talent, 
are both "hot properties." 

The spontaneous kicks these boys get 
working together is what makes their 
joint effort such a delight. The LP is 
fast-paced, highly entertaining and 
humorous. The two young performers 
obviously had a ball recording it, as 
they poke fun at each other, imitate 
each other's styles and deliver some 
fresh and inventive special material 
that should win them new adult fans. 

For these reasons, it is no wonder 
that their album has become one of 
the hottest LPs in record shops and 
a favorite with radio disc jockeys. 

This LP also points to a trend. Ex- 
pect a lot of other record artists to join 
forces in coming months. The success 
of Bobby and Chubby has not gone un- 
noticed in the waxworks. 



TWIST AGAIN 

• Since the Twist still dominates the 
pop music scene, we'd better bring our- 
selves up to date on the latest develop- 
ments. 

Foremost is the fact that Hollywood 
jumped into the act, with at least three 
movie firms racing to see who could get 
out the first movie about the Twist. 
Just under the wire was "The Conti- 
nental Twist," starring Louis Prima and 
June Wilkinson. Paramount's "Hey, 
Let's Twist," with Joey Dee and the 
Starliters, made it in time to catch the 
New Year coming in. "Twist Around 
the Clock," with Chubby Checker, 
seems in no danger of losing at the 
box office, even though it lost the race. 

Night clubs throughout the country, 
whose owners enviously studied photos 
of the standing-room-only crowds at the 
Peppermint Lounge, have quickly 
turned to the Twist for their salvation. 
Reports from all parts indicate that 
Twistin' clubs are doing their best 
business in years — by firing their ex- 
pensive name acts, and hiring less ex- 
pensive and usually unknown rock 'n' 
roll combos to supply dance music. 

And the record firms have not been 
idle. The initial rush of Twist LPs was 
only the beginning. Atco Records has 
released "Twist with, Bobby Darin'" 
(Atco 138), and the Bill Black combo 
has "Let's Twist Her" (Hi 12006). 
There's also "Look Who's Twistin' 
. . . Everybody!" by Oliver and the 
Twisters (Colpix 423), "Dancing the 
Big Twist" by the Ray Bryant combo 
(Columbia 1746), Louis Prima's "Doin' 
the Twist" (Dot 3410), "Let's Do the 
Twist for Adults" by Danny Davis and 
the Titans (MGM 3997), "Meyer Davis 
Plays the Twist" (Cameo 1014), and 
"Twist with Steve Alaimo" (Checker 
2981). 

Among all the others, one came up 
with an ingenious "twist," called "Dixie- 
land With a Twist" by the Carpetbag- 
gers (Chancellor 5023). Surprisingly 
enough, there's a refreshing, swinging 
sound with lots going on, carried off 
with good humor. 

And we can't finish this brief survey 
without mentioning the courageous at- 
tempt of Coral Records to buck the 
trend with what should be nominated 
as the album most unlikely to succeed 
— "Dance Along to Strict Tempos Ap- 
proved by the U. S. Ballroom Council," 
Jack Hensen and Ork. (Coral 75-7387). 



16 



^ 



mm 







Pupi Campo 



It was a mild mid-October day and the afternoon sun filtered through the 
open courtroom window, touching the judge's black robes, lighting the "In 
God We Trust" motto inscribed on the wall— and (Continued on page 1Z) 






17 





a Cure for 



Dr. Ben Casey played by Vince Edwards: 



Without a script, he may not know a scalpel from a forceps, 
but he makes a woman happy to open her mouth and say 
"Ah!" Vincent Edwards ("I hate to be called Vince but there's 
nothing I can do about it") is no bland, featureless performer 
destined for screaming and fainting and grabbing by the 
pony-tail set. This is a man for a full-blooded woman — and 
even other men like him for it. 

He's not too young: Thirty-ish. He can act, has twelve years 
of professional experience to prove it. He's a well-muscled 
athlete of six-feet-two. He weighs 195 pounds. In swimming 
trunks (his favorite attire), Vince displays a chest like a 
bearskin rug. An intense young man with the direct gaze of 
a neon sign underneath heavy brows, Vince is handsome in 
a kind of homely way — or vice versa. His nose, slightly 
dented, has a noticeable hump in the middle and suggests 
familiarity with the boxing ring. Luckily, his ears haven't 
suffered the cauliflower fate. 

There are those who say that Vince's rugged masculinity 
gives him the look of a younger and darker Burt Lancaster. 
Abner Greshler, Vince's agent, agrees: "Hal Wallis brought 
Vince out to the Coast as a sort of threat or to annoy Burt 
a little, since both are similar types." (Please turn the page) 




For this, you need a medical 
degree? Betty e Ackerman and 
Vince display natural talent 
as doctors on TV's Ben Casey. 



^"^^\^ 
* 




What Ails Every Woman 



19 i 



a Cure for What Ails Every Worn 



continued 



•»■■«■•« ■ 




Get plenty of rest. . . 



■ :■ 






Actually, the reticent, rather mysterious Mr. Ed- 
wards is no copy of anyone. He's himself. There's 
an electrifying quality about this man who looks 
more Greek than Italian, a magnetism based on 
virility rather than little-boy-lost appeal. 

He is definitely not lost. 

At the beginning of the brightest, most prom- 
ising year of his life, he is the same man he 
always was — a self-confessed "loner." But, of 
course, since that Monday night last October when 
he strode into view in Dr. Casey's side-buttoned 
white jacket — top button carefully unbuttoned, 
ballpoints lined up in breast pocket, stethoscope 
bulging at the hip — {Continued on page 81 I 










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21 



a to for What Ails Every Woman __ 



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Get plenty of' rest... 



Actually, the reticent, ratlier mysterious Mr. Ed- 
wards is no copy of anyone. He's himself. There's 
an electrifying quality ahout this man who looks 
more Greek than Italian, a magnetism hased on 
virilit) lather than littlc-liov-lost appeal. 

He is definitely not lost, 

At the beginning of the brightest, most prom- 
ising year of his life, he is the same man he 
always was— a self-confessed "loner." But. of 
course, since that Monday night last October when 
he strode into view in Dr. Casey's side-buttoned 
white jacket— lop button carefully unbuttoned, 
ballpoints lined up in breast pocket, stethoscope 
bulging at the hip - [Continued on page 81 I 



f 






Vine. Edward, and Slurry Nation 




good food... 



lots of loving care 



21 



Dwayne Hickman says: I ACT 17... 



I AM 27 



I 



FEEL like a hundred... 




So would you if you'd been through what I have! 



There are thirty-three different models of Dobie 
Gillis shirts (Montgomery Ward, Sears, and 
Penney 's) but Dwayne Hickman shakes his head 
at all of them. None is quite right with an ascot. 
And if you don't think ascots are important, then, 
unlike Dwayne, you've never gone two years be- 
tween love affairs. If you had, you'd know, like 
Dwayne, that anything is worth trying — at least 
once. 

Anyway, Dwayne isn't even counting shirts; 
he's counting half-hours— five years of them on 
The Bob Cummings Show, three years of them 
as star of Dobie Gillis. What's more, there's a 
year's worth of half-hours to go on his contract. 
And if things go well — with Dwayne's luck, how 
could they do anything else — who knows how 
much longer than that? Dwayne broods on it and 
groans. 

"My fans think of me as young and full of 
bounce," he says. "The fact is, I'm cranky, care- 
worn and exhausted. I never even wanted to be 
on television, and now when I count the half- 
hours on the screen, I'm the oldest man on TV." 
Then he gives you (Continued on page 68) 



I'm the 

OLDEST 
man on 




22 




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The first hint that the end was 
near came when it seemed Fabian 
had lost his voice. His manager, 
Bob Marcucci, was having the same 
trouble. At any rate, neither would 
talk . . . and no one could blame 
them. It was a hard thing to say 
and, when the announcement final- 
ly came, it was as though both had 
choked on the words. There was 
just the bare statement of fact — 
it was all over between Fabian and 
Bob; they had definitely split. 

Why? As we questioned both 
camps, we found an aura of pain- 
ful sadness that begged silently for 
sympathy and understanding. Fa- 
bian and Bob have both been deep- 
ly hurt. 

This is not just an everyday 
business farewell, and it adds up 
to more than just a cool handshake 
and the shreds of a contract blown 
every which way by the winds. 
From the very start, this was not 
the usual partnership between per- 
former and manager. Between Fa- 
bian and Bob Marcucci, there was 
none of those brisk, computer-like 
wheelings and dealings where a 
•lynx-eyed front man milks a hot 
property for their mutual profit — 
and there (Continued on page 77 I 



25 



El ' 



i* 



IS ONLY KIDDING Iff THIS PICTURE 



! ? 







> 






m 



The first hint that the end was 
near came when it seemed Fabian 
had lost his voice. His manager. 
Bob Marcucci, was having the same 
trouble. At any rate, neither would 
talk ... and no one could blame 
them. It was a hard thing to say 
and, when the announcement final- 
ly came, it was as though both had 
choked on the words. There was 
just the bare statement of fact- 
it was all over between Fabian and 
Bob; they had definitely split. 

Why? As we questioned both 
camps, we found an aura of pain- 
ful sadness that begged silently for 
sympathy and understanding. Fa- 
bian and Bob have both been deep- 
ly hurt. 

This is not just an everyday 
business farewell, and it adds up 
to more than just a cool handshake 
and the shreds of a contract blown 
every which way by the winds. 
From the very start, this was not 
the usual partnership between per- 
former and manager. Between Fa- 
bian and Bob Marcucci, there was 
none of those brisk, computer-like 
wheelings and dealings where a 
•lynx-eyed front man milks a hot 
property for their mutual profit — 
and there (Continued on page 77) 



2a 





HIM! 




Jo Ann Castle's advice to wives who want love 




Jo Ann Castle couldn't believe her ears. She had been 
a bride for exactly two weeks, yet here was her brand-new 
husband telling her off! Of course, he was a camera en- 
gineer for ABC-TV and presumably knew all about 
photographic angles — but did that give him the right to 
say such things about her curves? 

Dean Hall was saying, in loving but positive tones, 
"Honey, now that we're married, you're going to have 
to reduce. You're twenty pounds too heavy." 

Jo Ann listened, open-mouthed. He went on, "It isn't 
good for you physically or professionally. Here's the card 
of a man who's done wonders for some people at the 
station. I want you to call him. Now." 

Meekly, she took the card, phoned Dr. Douglas Chad- 
ney's office — and made an appointment for that very 
afternoon. "Good girl," said Dean. He added, with a 
grin, "In a way, it's all my fault, I guess." 

And, in a way, it was. 

Jo Ann's weight problem started in the late summer 
of 1960. Until that time, both her prospects and her person 
had been in great shape. For a year, she'd been a regular 
on Lawrence Welk's enormously (Please turn the page) 



27 



Lose 

POUNDS 

Before 
You 
Lose 

HIM! 

continued 





■ 



It was Dean Hall's idea his wife should reduce . . . Jo Anns idea that working on the new home could help take off weight. 



Hip, hip, away! A new and slenderizing slant on housework. 



This chimney-sweep looks for glamour, not soot. 





The Halls find that measuring windows takes off more inches than the Twist. 



Ballet for one window-cleaner. 



popular Saturday show on ABC-TV, playing honky-tonk piano and appear- 
ing in production numbers. She had acquired a sharp wardrobe and was 
buying a red Jaguar. At twenty-one, she was lovely to look at, delightful to 
listen to, refreshing to know. Professionally, she was successful. Socially, her 
crowd of boyfriends was as thick as Los Angeles traffic. 

Then, one brilliant September day, Jo Ann and several other members of 
the Welk "stock company" strolled over to the studio cafe for a cup of 
coffee. A cameraman from ABC-TV stopped at Jo (Continued on page 79) 



i i 



Down with pounds — though Jo Ann recommends a larger brush for stairs. 



Bending over backward can help! 





WORLD 



George Maharis regarded his dark, hard-skinned hands much as 
though he were seeing them for the first time. He turned the palms 
up and studied them for another moment. "My hands lie about me," 
he said quietly. "I mean, they lie about my insides." 

He looked back at his hands. "You know, people judge you by 
your hands," he said. "They set you up as this kind or that kind of 
person. I never do that. I won't make the same mistake about others 
that they do about me. Most people peg me wrong. But, from what 
they have to look at, I don't blame them. 

"I was meant to be another kind of guy, but I have to live a dif- 
ferent outer image. I'm just beginning to realize that. People say 
I'm direct. I want to be tactful. People say I'm tough. I want to be 
tender. People say I'm a diamond in the rough." He laughed. "You 
know— I'd like to be a diamond in the smooth?" 

He stared out the window. "Not long ago, I met a girl who turned 
me inside out. All I had to do was look at her and my heart pounded 
and my mind felt like it was on a merry-go-round. 

"She wasn't Hollywood-beautiful, but she was more attractive to 
me than most of the glamour girls. I wanted to know her, to under- 
stand her. The thought even entered my mind that I could love her. 
I wanted to touch her and feel her warmth and get that great elec- 
tricity. Yet I wanted her to feel the same way. That half-a-love-is- 
better-than-none baloney is not for me. (Please turn the page) 

by TONY WALL 



30 



THE 




G$$fe WORLD OF GEORGE MAHARIS 

Ik 



George laughs — 
with Dad and Mom 
— but says that's 
fatal when making 
love to a girl! 




continued 




>\t 




Anyhow," George remembers, "I played it cool. I 
knew what she expected of me. The rough, tough, 
fast-working bachelor who's out to make it with 
every girl he meets — and the more he can make in a 
week, the better. I surprised her, I thought. I took it 
easy after I met her. I touched her and got the volt- 
age. I put my arms around her and felt her body. 
That's a great moment, isn't it? When a girl you're 
crazy about responds. 

"Things went along pretty well, but our emotions 
were building. Every time we dated, it became more 
and more difficult to keep our heads. Finally, one 
evening, we both realized — without saying a word — 
that we could stand it no longer. She invited me to 
her apartment. My heart almost jumped out of my 
chest and my head was reeling. She smiled at me as 
she opened the door. We went in. 

"The first thing that hit me was the white carpet, 
wall-to-wall, in every room. Every square, inch of that 
apartment floor was white! I flipped. 

"I said, T want to take off my shoes. Okay?' She 
said okay. I walked around and trotted from one 
room to another in my bare feet. It was the most lux- 
urious sensation I've ever experienced with a girl. 

"Then I said, 'You know, it's like walking around 
on a hundred dead polar bears.' She looked at me as 
though I had said something dirty. 'Get out!' she 
hollered. 'Get out of this apartment! Get out!' 

"She picked up my socks and shoes, shoved them 
at me and pushed me out the door and locked it. And 



in the silence that followed the slam, I heard her — 
very faintly — crying." Maharis paused and shrugged 
in a confusion that still bugged him. "Can you imag- 
ine that?" he asked. "The only thing I can figure out 
is that she loved polar bears! 

"Maybe my mistake was being flippant. I guess the 
worst thing you can do with a girl, when her emo- 
tions are aroused, is to be funny. It ruins everything 
— instantly. Perhaps if I had said that the white car- 
pet made me feel I was walking on clouds in a 
beautiful dream, there might have been a different 
story to tell. . . . What I mean is that, so often, when 
you try to be honest, you get in trouble — or lose a 
gal. 

"Hell, I started in show business by being a wise 
guy. I wanted to be a singer then. I walked the streets 
of New York, auditioning for managers who ignored 
me after the first note. I had a voice like steel. 

"One tired afternoon, I went to a theater where 
they were trying out male singers for the chorus in a 
musical. I sang a few bars, as everyone else did. The 
guy who was listening turned me down without even 
looking up. He said, 'Sorry — next.' 

"I hung around anyhow. About forty-five minutes 
later, he stood up and said, 'Now all of you who were 
accepted, step forward.' You guessed it — I stepped 
forward and got a job." 

The confusion which Maharis admits suffering is a 
bewilderment only George himself imagines. His fans 
consider him one of the (Continued on page 88) 



32 




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Are Peter &The Wolf 

.^'~ k Hurting The Kennedys* 






Above: Pres. and Mrs. John F. Kennedy in the open 
air. Below: Clan leader Frank Sinatra and Peter 
Lawford — J.F.K.'s brother-in-law — in night club. 



■J m 



No memo has been issued on 
White House stationery. No 
edict has been promulgated. 
No secret conferences have 
been held in smoke-filled rooms. 
No cabinet meetings have been 
called. 

But one thing is certain. 

Somehow, somewhere, some 
time ago, the Clan led by foot- 
loose and fancy-free Frank 
Sinatra received an informal 
request from the nation's capi- 
tal. It was: To avoid making 
big, black headlines which 
might in any way reflect on 

{Continued on page 90 ) 



iV%E&1&X? 




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It started Innocently. . . 
no one could have 
guessed it would 
end in heartbreak 
and headlines. 

For the real story 

j 
behihd the breakup,' 

please turn the page m 






■ 






Madlyn Rhue 



After 18 happy years, George was suddenly linked with other women 



40 




George was a very devoted 
husband in the early years. 




In 1954, Jody was adopted into 
the seemingly enchanted circle. 

It had been 
a good life . . . 

a good love . . . 

// should have 
lasted forever 








A story you wouldn't expect . . . one to read after a 
bone-tiring day . . . when even a bed looks too hard ! 



They call him Perpetual Motion. The Dynamo. Mr. Energy. The 
Atomic Blast. Mr. Nuclear Fission. But it all adds up to the same 
thing. Put him in front of a camera and mike, or on a stage — 
TV, radio, Broadway, Atlantic City, Miami Beach, anywhere 
— and it's go, go, go! The man seems tireless. The round black 
eyes throw off sparks. The dark head tosses. The arms circle 
constantly. The feet are never still. 

Yet the odd thing about Bert Parks is that, at heart, he's no 
exhibitionist. At a party, he can be the quietest man in the room. 
He sits on the sidelines and watches, enjoying what the other 
fellow is doing. Even Bert's laughter (Continued on page 83) 

by FRANCES KISH 



Tbis is Mu 




44 




45 






Lome Greene and his bride 
drink a honeymoon toast. 



^ 




' *"■'..•■- 



Shhhhh! We re Married 

The whole town buzzed. Until the very moment Lome Greene and Nancy Anne Deale applied for 
their b'cense in Santa Monica last December, Hollywood hipsters hadn't even known that the 
46-year-old star of Bonanza was romantically interested in the pretty 28-year-old actress. 
Now, suddenly, it was being whispered that they'd been deeply in love for at least two 
years, and planning their wedding for months. Why all the secrecy? Was it the 
difference in age? After all, that wasn't as great as in some other highly pub- 
licized filmland marriages, such as Debbie Reynolds and Harry Karl! 
Was it the failure of Lome's earlier marriage, back in To- 
ronto? But that — {Continued on page 89) 











WW I I 








'% 



Shhhhh! Were Married 

The whole town buzzed. Until the vprv ™„„ * i 

46. y „,old s,„ of Bon™. w „ ZT^ ^^ T "'' "" '"" ""' "» 

g Alter all, that wasn t as great as ,n some other highly pub- 
hczed filmland marriages, such as Debbie Reynolds and Harry Karl- 
Was it the failure of Lome's earlier marriage, back in To- 
ronto? But that- (Continued on page 89) 







^Mut 





Lome Greene and his bride 
drink a honeymoon toast. 





mm 




From left: On couch— Kathy, Peggy, "Sis" and Chris, Bill and Annie, Mimi, "DeeDee," Janet. Floor— Joey, Billy, Danny, Pat. 



Homework for everybody! Sis even finds time to help the singing Lennon Sisters (Peggy, Kathy, Janet) with their clothes. 




(^^(jj^opImma! 




Well, read my story — I keep house 

for more people than I can keep 
track of • by I sa belle "Sis" Lennon 

Just let me list the members of our family: 
Bill Lennon, father of eleven. Isabelle Lennon — 
I'm usually called "Sis" — mother of eleven. (We 
have had twelve children, but Mary, born in 1948, 
died as an infant.) Diane, called "DeeDee," now 
married to Richard Gass; Peggy, born in April, 
1941; Kathy— August, 1943; Janet— June, 1946; 
Danny — February, 1950; Pat — November, 1951; 
Bill Jr.— July, 1954; Mimi— October, 1955; Joey- 
May, 1957; Anne — January, 1959; and Chris — 
March, 1960. 

DeeDee and her husband have their own home but, 
happily for us, seem to be in and out of our house 
almost as much as the unmarried children. "Ex 
officio" members of our household include Kay 
Esser, who is in charge of the girls' wardrobe for 
The Lawrence Welk Show, {Continued on page 84) 



With the second shift off to school, Si6 settles down to her chores — with the "assistance" of strictly non-orphan Annie. 







BOB CUMMINGS 

TO THE U. S. GOVERNMENT 



Bob Cummings has been blasted in recent headlines which have nothing to do 
with Hollywood stardom. The stories themselves report the U.S. Government's 
seizure of certain vitamin-mineral products and sales promotion material, on 
charges of misrepresentation in the prevention or treatment of disease. But the 
big type has focused on Bob, as an officer of the parent company and as author 
of "Stay Young and Vital." We are proud that Bob has chosen TV Radio 
Mirror to present his side of the controversy. — The Editors 

"I've never felt so hurt — they've hit me where I live." Bob Cummings' still 
young and vital features were creased with distress as he spoke. His open hand 
lay across the newspaper story about a Government crackdown against one of 
the distributors for Nutri-Bio Corporation. Bob, as vice-president of the com- 
pany, had been singled out in all the headlines dealing with the allegations 
of the Food and Drug Administration that the food supplements were being 
promoted with false claims. 

"Look here," he said, "I've spent almost a lifetime building up my credit 
with the American people. If I've had any success at all, it's because they like 
me, because they believe in me. And up to now, they've had no reason to doubt 
that the word of Bob Cummings was as good as gold. (Continued on page 65) 



* 



50 



i: 







1 



BOB CUMMINGS 

TaLIs wl 

TO THE U. S. GOVERNMENT 



Bob Cummings has been blasted in recent headlines which have nothing to do 
with Hollywood stardom. The stories themselves report the U.S. Government's 
seizure of certain vitamin-mineral products and sales promotion material, on 
charges of misrepresentation in the prevention or treatment of disease. But the 
big type has focused on Bob, as an officer of the parent company and as author 
of "Stay Young and Vital." We are proud that Bob has chosen TV Radio 
Mirror to present his side of the controversy.— The Editors 
"I've never felt so hurt-they've hit me where I live." Bob Cummings' still 
young and vital features were creased with distress as he spoke. His open hand 
lay across the newspaper story about a Government crackdown against one of 
the distributors for Nutri-Bio Corporation. Bob, as vice-president of the com- 
pany, had been singled out in all the headlines dealing with the allegations 
of the Food and Drug Administration that the food supplements were being 
promoted with false claims. 

"Look here" he said, "I've ,pe„, ,l most . l ifetime um 
w„h he A m e„c„, pe„p,e. „ ,Ve had any TOS „ all , it , h J K ££ 

w„,d of Boh C,„„„„ gs „ a « a s good „ g„l d . {Cmbmed „„ page a) 






50 





£^fc 



* • 



*\ 



IS THERE ROOM IN 

YOUR HEART FOR 
A NEW FAMILY? 



You never know what love can do, but when you welcome Our Five 8 



52 




X 









* ^F* 



Like many sisters throughout the land, the 
five in this new TV family are as different 
from each other as night and day. Completely 
individual, unlike in looks, temperament and 
talents, as well as age! But they are bound 
together by that strongest of ties : Love. Their 
mutual devotion — even in the midst of those 
personal disagreements which can sometimes 
split even the closest family — helps them to 
surmount all problems. And problems, of 
course, are inevitable ... in a TV daytime 
drama, as in life itself. But, first, we'd better 
introduce you to the Lee family, as seen on 
Our Five Daughters over NBC-TV, Monday 



through Friday, 3:30 to 4 P.M. EST. From 
left to right, they are: Mary, 27; Barbara, 
25; their mother Helen and father Jim; 
Anne, 16; Marjorie, 18; and Jane, 23. . . . 
Anne is still in high school, struggling with 
typical teen-age problems in class, at home, 
and in her budding social life. Marjorie is 
already the cute coquette, popular with boys, 
aware that she can have what she wants from 
life by using her charm. Jane is the serious 
one, the family "brain," who has no time for 
boyfriends and only one goal: To hang up 
her shingle, now that she has her law de- 
gree. Barbara is her (Please turn the page) 



daughters into your home and life, you'll be a lot closer to finding out 



53 




IS THERE ROOM IN 
YOUR HEART FOR 
A NEW FAMILY? 

You never know what love con do, but when you welcome Our W 



Like many sisters throughout the land, the 
five in this new TV family are as different 
from each other as night and day. Completely 
individual, unlike in looks, temperament and 
talents, as well as age! But they are bound 
together by that strongest of ties: Love. Their 
mutual devotion — even in the midst of those 
personal disagreements which can sometimes 
split even the closest family — helps them to 
surmount all problems. And problems, of 
course, are inevitable ... in a TV daytime 
drama, as in life itself. But, first, we'd better 
introduce you to the Lee family, as seen on 
Our Five Daughters over NBC-TV, Monday 



through Friday, S:M) to 4 P.M. EST. From 
left to right, they are: Mary, 27; Barbara, 
25; their mother Helen and father Jim; 
Anne, 16; Marjorie, 18; and Jane, 23. . . . 
Anne is still in high school, struggling with 
typical teen-age problems in class, at home, 
and in her budding social life. Marjorie is 
already the cute coquette, popular with hoys, 
aware that she can have what she wants from 
life by using her charm. Jane is the serious 
one, the family "brain," who has no time for 
boyfriends and only one goal: To hang up 
her shingle, now that she has her law de- 
cree. Barbara is her (Please turn the page) 



daughters into your home and life, you V be a lot closer to finding out 



S3 



IS THERE ROOM IN YOUR HEART FOR A NEW FAMILY ? 

continued 



mother's image — solid and reliable; she has good 
sense, good looks, a good job and excellent marriage 
prospects! Mary, the eldest, is the only Lee girl 
who's married . . . thus far. Her husband is Don 
Weldon, a young advertising executive, and they're 
looking forward to the arrival of their first child. 
Getting together a cast with such divergent tastes 
and interests was a Herculean task for all connected 
with the new serial drama. Our Five Daughters was 
months in the making, before it replaced From These 
Roots on the network. Actually, it's been a full two 




Helen and Jim Lee: Realism and romance are 
blended in their TV lives — as in your oivn. 



years since the idea first struck sparks. Created by 
Robert Aaron — who directs NBC-TV's daytime pro- 
graming — Daughters was turned over to producer 
Eugene Burr and director Paul Lammers, both of 
whom worked on its dramatic predecessor. 

Burr explains: "I usually fight 'type casting' like 
mad. But it's a fact of TV life that, in a serial, you 
have to bow to it, to a certain extent. In day after 



day appearances, even the best actor cannot help 
but let his own personality come through. On a single 
show, he may achieve a great characterization com- 
pletely different from his own personality. But just 
let him try that, on a daily serial which may run 
for years, and bits and pieces of himself are bound 
to show. So we chose our people carefully." 

With this in mind, it's intriguing to follow those 
chosen, as their own lives and temperaments become 
interwoven with a fresh, exciting story, day after 
day. Some are familiar faces; others may be new 
to daytime audiences. For the record, here is the 
roll call: Jacquie Courtney as Anne . . . Iris Joyce 
as Marjorie . . . Nuella Dierking as Jane . . . Patricia 
Allison as Barbara . . . Wynne Miller as Mary. 

And, if you think their TV mother, Helen Lee, 
looks loveliest of all, you have an eye for beauty 
and a memory for movies of yesteryear . . . she's 
silent-film queen Esther Ralston! Father, too, will be 
recognized by Broadway playgoers and TV viewers 
. . . truck-dispatcher Jim is handsome Michael Keene. 
Rounding out a distinguished roster are Robert W. 
Stewart (previously seen on From These Roots) as 
Uncle Charlie, and Ben Hayes as Mary's husband. 

All together, and with the many characters who 
inevitably touch their lives, they act out a story 
producer Burr believes will be a welcome departure 
from what he considers the two basic types of serial 
so far: "We are trying to go up the middle . . . 
between the saccharine and the melodramatic. There's 
a place for all, but it's this third type we want to 
do in Our Five Daughters. We're going after reality." 
He reminded us that, in the opening episode, Jim 
met with an accident which incapacitated him. "This 
is the thing every woman within a certain income 
bracket fears every day of her life, consciously or 
unconsciously. She asks herself, What will we do 
if this family's husband and father gets hurt or ill? 
She can sympathize, identify, and understand. She 
can see something of herself in Helen's situation." 
Identification, entertainment, quality. Add to these 
a storyline which can dart in any direction in which 
five lively sisters are apt to steer it, and Our Five 
Daughters is bound to find a place in your heart. 



54 









This man's story is one youll want to tell your grandchildren... 
It began four years ago. on television. ..Do you remember? 



the page) 





He's John Glenn: 



You saw him on the television screen, over four 
years ago. Now, after a long and rather busy inter- 
val, he's back on video with a different sort of act. 
You might even call it a spectacular. 

The ruggedly handsome face and boyish smile of 
Marine Lt. Col. John Hershel Glenn has become a 
familiar sight to tens of millions of TV viewers in 
recent days — as America's first pioneer to orbit into 
outer space and around the earth. Today and for a 
good many tomorrows to come, he will continue to 
outshine all the Matt Dillons and Paladins and other 
dramatic heroes who grace or disgrace the nation's 
50,000,000 television screens weekly, nightly, and 



The greatest test of all: John in the cockpit of 
a Mercury spacecraft — just where he wanted to be. 



Sharing John's TV jackpot: Eddie Bodges— who 
went on to win his own youthful kind of fame. 



56 




The Man Who Hit The Jackpot -Twice 




John's family in his Arlington (Va.) home: Left to right — father-in-law, Dr. H. W. Castor; John's wife 
Anna; Mrs. Castor; daughter Lyn; son David; John himself; his parents, Mr. and Mrs. John H. Glenn Sr. 



sometimes hourly. They are make-believe. Glenn is 
real. His historic feat does more than bring vicari- 
ous thrills to men and boys who'll never out-draw 
the evil rustler or crack open an international dope 
ring. Glenn's fantastic flight fires the imagination 
and reaches deep into the human soul to stir and 
gladden the heart. 

And yet, through it all, through all the days of 
unimaginable significance, John Glenn remained 
John Glenn: Diffident, endearingly modest, somehow 



boyish in the way he seemed to convey his astonish- 
ment and delight at the greatness that has befallen 
him. But, of course, beyond that is the image he will 
always project of confidence and strength. The 
Astronaut is, perhaps more than anyone else right 
now, the embodiment of America's vast, deep in- 
vulnerable might. 

Col. Glenn's test role, as you've seen it on televi- 
sion, has been far different from his earlier visit to 
the land of the cathodes. {Please turn the page) 



57 



He's John Glenn: The Man Who Hit The Jackpot -Twice 



continued 



Cudgel your memory a bit and see if you can con- 
jure up the picture of a younger, a trifle more playful 
Marine officer who, back in 1957, laughed and hi- 
jinxed his way into millions of homes from the stage 
of the once highly popular TV program, Name That 
Tune. 

In his orbital feat, Glenn shared the television screen 
with the hellish green and red flames of a mighty 
Atlas Missile. 

In Name That Tune, Glenn, then a Marine Major, 
shared it with the green of the good old American 
currency and the red of the flaming, tousled hair of a 
young boy named Eddie Hodges. 

Urging them on in Name That Tune, joking with 
them, laughing and occasionally singing with them, 
was that program's emcee, comedian George de Witt. 

Nearly four and a half years have 
elapsed since Glenn's performance 
on that happy-go-lucky big-money 
prize show, and a good deal has 
happened to all the principals in- 
volved since then. As we shall see. 

Name That Tune was one of the 
most popular of all the big give- 
away shows. And Marine Major 
John Glenn was one of Tune's most 
charming, delightful contestants. 

His appearance on the show — he 
premiered on it in September, 1957 — was no accident. 
Two months earlier, Glenn had become the first man 
to span the entire continent by jet at supersonic speed. 
On July 16, 1957, he'd pushed his sleek, needle-nosed 
Navy F8U Crusader from Los Angeles to Brooklyn 
in the breathtaking speed of three hours and twenty- 
three minutes. It was a dazzling achievement, and 
the newspapers and a few TV news shows were quick 
to leap at the opportunity of interviewing America's 
latest Jet Age giant. And Glenn made a fine impres- 
sion, from the start. 

While observing one of these TV interviews one 
day late in July, Harry Salter (then producer of Name 
That Tune and now producer of today's Yours For 
A Song) concluded that Glenn had that mysterious, 
elusive personality ingredient called "projection," and 



TV's proud to have 
had a hand in Col. 
Glenn's career . . . 
proud to share in 
his epochal flight 



decided to rope the dashing air hero for Tune. A staff 
member journeyed to New Concord, Ohio, where 
Glenn was then staying, learned that Glenn had the 
musical knowledge and background to qualify as a 
contestant and, when the Major agreed, promptly 
signed him up. 

Now enter Eddie Hodges. Earlier, in Name That 
Tune's eternal hunt for new faces, another staff man 
literally bumped into young Eddie while he was walk- 
ing along a New York City street with his father and 
grandfather. The staffer got talking to Eddie, was 
captured by his sprightliness, his buoyant personality 
and his quick sidewalk wit. (Example: "Where'd you 
get that red hair?" Answer: "It came with my head.") 
He quickly, right there on the spot, asked Eddie to 
become a contestant on the show. 

Eddie's appearance on Name Tha' 
Tune dovetailed with John Glenn's. 
Under the show's format, a stage 
contestant was asked to "name a 
tune" sent in by someone else. In 
this case, the someone else was 
Major Glenn. Eddie instantly rec- 
ognized the tune — "South America, 
Take It Away" — and, accordingly, 
Eddie and Glenn became partners 
in the big drive for the top money 
of $26,000. 
Anyone who saw the two of them, the Marine hero 
and the goggle-eyed young urchin fresh from the 
streets of New York, can scarcely forget their high 
good humor, their brow-furrowing search for the right 
answers, their jokes, their bantering with George de 
Witt, and always, at least once during each appear- 
ance, a duet — Glenn with his booming baritone voice, 
Eddie with his piping boy's soprano. Occasionally, 
George, unable to constrain himself, joined in the 
singing, too. 

On five separate Tuesday nights, Eddie Hodges 
teamed up with the handsome Marine Major (whom 
he was by now unabashedly hero-worshipping) and, 
each time, they reached the nightly jackpot of $5,000. 
At the end of the five weeks, they had won $26,000 — 
five $5,000 prizes, plus the {Continued on page 70) 



58 




SPECIAL MIDWEST STORIES 



Turnabout is fair play — wife Vivian 
helps with disc choosing so Millard 
lends helping (?) hand in kitchen. 





ONE FOR THE ROAD 

Meet Millard Hansen, who "drives" his listeners home each weekday evening, via WCFL 



■ As a child, Millard Hansen would talk to a doorknob 
. . . pretending it was a microphone. Today, that door- 
knob has become a real mike . . . one which thousands of 
Chicagoans are tuned to every day as Millard does his 
4 to 7 p.m. Road Show. Having been through his own 
share of traffic jams, Millard knows driving home after a 
hard day's work can be a nerve-wrenching experience. So 
the youthful deejay gears his program especially to home- 
bound motorists with music, up-to-the-minute news, 
weather and traffic reports all cleverly woven together with 
lots of bright patter. . . . Soon after Millard outgrew his 
doorknob-talking-to stage, he was ready to plunge into 
broadcasting for real. A local station (WHFC) in Cicero, 
Illinois, presented a daily high-school program and Millard 



was soon writing, directing, producing and acting in it. He 
then went on to jobs at other Illinois stations, eventually 
joining up with WCFL. . . . Married since last May, Millard 
and his pretty brunette wife Vivian share a small apartment 
furnished in Danish decor. Vivian works as a supervisor for 
the telephone company but always has plenty of time 
to help Millard choose records for his show. Both dislike 
rock 'n' roll, preferring music by the big bands, old favor- 
ites and standard tunes. In return for her aid, Millard 
lends a helping hand with the dishes and other household 
chores. But, says Vivian with a grin, "He's a better 
deejay than he is a housekeeper!" Ask one of Millard's 
many listeners and they'll tell you that's just how they 
like it. How else could they be driving home on air? 



59 



« 





VJMrMr x 

and tlie Small Fry 



60 




Duane's wood-carving session brings forth both ad- 
miration and a little wifely kibitzing front Lois. 



A cute little puppet keeps the kids smil- 
ing . . . with a helping "hand" from 
Duane Ellett of WHO-TV in Des Moines 



"W really feel sorry for the guy who does not enjoy his 
J| work," says Duane Ellett, a fellow who really does 
enjoy his work for WHO-TV and Radio in Des Moines, 
Iowa. When confronted with the fact that he does five 
morning shows a week, brings the kiddies seven television 
shows a week and has a deejay show Monday through 
Friday — all afternoon long — he simply says, "I enjoy it a 
great deal." ... All but three of Duane's thirty-eight years 
were spent in the Des Moines area, the last fifteen of them 
with WHO. "We are one big happy family here at Central 
Broadcasting, and I am proud to be a member of it," says 




Junior musicale is presided over by dad Duane as Dan, Barbara and small Kathy make with the beat. 



Duane. Speaking of happy families, he has one at home, 
too. His charming wife Lois naturally has plenty to do, 
keeping three healthy children in line. Their thirteen-year- 
old son Dan is the baseball fan. Nine-year-old Barbara is 
the musician, while two-year-old Kathy is the "trouble- 
maker — according to Duane. . . . Duane has had a varied 
career in radio and television, starting as a staff announcer 
while attending Drake University in Des Moines. From this, 
he progressed to deejay shows, singing with WHO's staff 
orchestra, doing Western ballads on the WHO Barn Dance 
Frolic — with a dash of writing, sportscasting, news report- 



ing — and then, with the advent of television, ventriloquism. 
Talented at woodcarving, Duane created a little wooden 
hand puppet, or hand "puppy," and named it "Floppy." 
Couple Floppy with the best in animated cartoons, and 
small wonder the small fry refuse to watch anything else! 
. . . Duane's hobbies encompass camping, outdoor cooking, 
woodcarving, and antique cars. His advice to young people 
would be to get all the education possible and then — "Find 
a job that is at least related to the work which you really 
enjoy." Duane Ellett is happy, walking, talking proof of the 
wisdom of that pleasant and practical philosophy. 



61 



. 




62 



- 









Everyone loves to reminisce . . . and people in the movie 
industry are no exception. So listen, as they recall the 
excitement, the razzle-dazzle and thrills of days gone by 




Bronco Billy Anderson, the screen's first cowboy, relates how he played six 
parts in "The Great Train Robbery" — none of them on a horse . . . 
ADan Jones recalls how he almost "became" Nelson Eddy . . . and Roddy Mc- 
Dowall reflects on the problems of being a child star. . . . All these colorful 
anecdotes are a part of Memoirs Of The Movies, a series of sixteen broadcasts 
being presented by the Westinghouse Broadcasting Company in cooperation 
with the Oral History Research Project of Columbia University. Based on first- 
person recollections of movie greats, the series is the first in a continuing 
project built around actual voices of people who participated in the activity or 
event under study. Some of these personalities have since passed from the scene, 
but their voices live on to tell the story of happiness and heartache that was — 
and is — Hollywood. U.S.A. It's an exciting story you won't want to miss. 



63 




A "LIVE" WIRE 




Popular singer Roberta Sherwood brought 
music, sparkling conversation to Jack's show. 



Everything about Jack Denton s 
WLW-C show is live — the audi- 
ence, the band, the guests. But 
the liveliest of all is Jack himself! 



Lovely Gloria Swanson and Jack discuss every- 
thing from show business to styles to finance. 



64 



■ Ask WLW-C's Jack Denton what made him go into 
broadcasting, and he says with a grin, "Hunger." Actually, 
it was a desire to get off the road ... he had, for many 
years, been playing night clubs and summer-stock shows. 
A chance visit to his hometown of Aurora, Illinois, was 
the beginning. A friend of Jack's told him of a new show 
which was starting on WLW-C in Columbus and Jack 
decided to audition. He got the job, and has been be- 
coming more and more popular with viewers since his 
daily 9 to 10:30 a.m. show began in October. . . . Jack 
likes to say he started in show business at the bottom . . . 
of a pole. At the age of sixteen, he joined a Midwest 
traveling carnival as low man in a perch-pole act. Soon 
after, he entered an amateur show, using Milton Berle's 
jokes. Berle happened to be playing the same theater and 
was a bit surprised to find someone stealing his material. 



He soon thought of a way to stop it. Two years later, he 
hired Jack as his writer. From there, Jack went on to 
become a night-club entertainer . . . this time using his 
own jokes! . . . "In case anyone is curious," smiles Jack, 
"I'm a bachelor. That's a guy who only has to fix one 
breakfast in the morning." Jack makes said breakfast in 
an apartment which is located near the studio. When not 
so occupied, he likes swimming, reading, and playing 
his bongo drums. As a matter of fact, Jack is so fond of 
the latter, he carries the drums around in his car so he 
can be ready to play at drop of a downbeat. . . . Jack an- 
swers all letters himself. The reason? Says Jack, "I re- 
member writing fan letters to radio stars when I was a 
small boy. To this day, I can remember those who an- 
swered and those who didn't. I'd like to be remembered 
as one who did." 



I' 



Bob Cummings 

(Continued from page 50) 
Now, we have more than 75,000 dis- 
tributors who operate for us under a 
contract that states clearly what they 
may and may not do in selling our 
products. One distributor — mind you, 
one out of 75,000 — goes astray. Wham- 
mo! The entire company — all our prod- 
ucts, everything we're trying to do to 
improve the eating habits and health 
of the country — is thrown under a 
cloud. And my name is splashed about 
in black ink as though I personally had 
broken the rules of the Food and Drug 
Administration. Perhaps it's true that 
this distributor made misleading claims 
for the products. But aren't the head- 
lines which link me to the violations 
equally misleading and harmful?" 

An investigation of the facts seems 
to support Cummings in his feeling of 
indignation. For example, one thing not 
included in the stories about the crack- 
down was Bob's first reaction to the 
investigation. It was a loud and hearty 
"I'm for it!" He then went on to de- 
clare that he was speaking first as a 
citizen, and second as an official of 
Nutri-Bio. "To me — and this is a pas- 
sion that goes back to my childhood — 
nothing's so important as the health 
and progress of our people. That's why 
I sincerely welcome the action of the 
F.D.A. I'm glad to see they are on their 
toes, watching over the interests of the 
consumers. I can't speak, of course, for 
all our distributors scattered over the 
land. But, to the best of my knowledge, 
Nutri-Bio has always tried to meet the 
requirements of the F.D.A. What's 
more, as long as I'm connected with the 
firm, it always will." 

Although the charges leveled against 
the Washington, D.C. distributor mark 
the third complaint made against Nutri- 
Bio in the four years it has been in 
business, this would appear to be a 
good record as compared with other 
companies in the same line. Bob 
phrases it: "We're not perfect and we 
don't claim to be. We've never said our 
products are miracle drugs or can over- 
turn the laws of nature. While we screen 
each distributor carefully, there are 
simply too many for us to guarantee 
them all, absolutely and forever." 

Along with the charges of making 
false and improper claims for the vita- 
min and mineral products, the F.D.A. 
claims that Bob's best-selling book, 
"Stay Young and Vital," was being 
used in pushing sales. "This," argues 
Bob, "can't be put on me, can it? Using 
the book for this purpose is strictly 
against company rules and this fellow 
in Washington must have known that. 
Besides, my book was written long be- 
fore I became a vice-president of Nutri- 
Bio." 

Bob's usual air of radiant good cheer 
was not in evidence. He tried to smile, 
but his face stubbornly refused to re- 
lax its troubled frown. "What's being 
overlooked in all this hullabaloo is the 
fact that, long before the book or my 
position at Nutri-Bio, my greatest con- 
cern in life was the subject of diet, 
exercise and health. It has been a more 




Let's talk frankly about 

internal 
cleanliness 



Day before yesterday, many women hes- 
itated to talk about the douche even to 
their best friends, let alone to a doctor 
or druggist. 

Today, thank goodness, women are 
beginning to discuss these things freely 
and openly. But — even now — many 
women don't realize what is involved in 
treating "the delicate zone." 

They don't ask. Nobody tells them. 
So they use homemade solutions which 
may not be completely effective, or some 
antiseptics which may be harsh or in- 
flammatory. 

It's time to talk frankly about inter- 
nal cleanliness. 

Here are the facts: tissues in "the deli- 
cate zone" are very tender. Odors are 
very persistent. Your comfort and well- 
being demand a special preparation for 
the douche. Today there is such a prep- 
aration. 

This preparation is far more effective 



in antiseptic and germicidal action than 
old-fashioned homemade solutions. It is 
far safer to delicate tissues than other 
liquid antiseptics for the douche. It 
cleanses, freshens, eliminates odor, 
guards against chafing, relaxes and pro- 
motes confidence. 

This is modern woman's way to inter- 
nal cleanliness. It is the personal antisep- 
tic for women, made specifically for "the 
delicate zone." It is called Zonite®. Com- 
plete instructions for use come in every 
package. In cases of persistent discharge, 
women are advised to see 
their doctors. 



Millions of women al- 
ready consider Zonite as 
important a part of their 
grooming as 



their bath. 
You owe it 
to yourself 
to try Zonite. 



*• Guaranteed by <> 
.Good Housekeeping 




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WITH 

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The Halsion Plan is 
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with a clear com- 
plexion. You must 
get satisfactory re- 
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will be refunded. 



The Halsion Plan treats your 
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• As easy to take as vitamins 

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rs 



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ALLAN DRUG CO. 0eP t. 967 

801 Westmount Drive., Los Angeles 46, California 

□ Please rush C.O.D. 30-day supply of Halsion, 

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O I enclose $3.95, check or money order, 

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. If I am not delighted after 10 days I may return 
I the unused capsules for prompt refund. 



• P1MM.ES 



Name_ 



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By ALLAN ., 



(please print) 



Address. 
City. 



. Zone Stale I 



65 



A DATE TO REMEMBER! 




WO ML WN PHOTOPLAY'S 

LD MEDAL 




AWARD 



SEE THE STARS YOU PICKED 

IN PERSON ON THE 

A 





\J l— L. 




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SUNDAY NIGHT- MARCH 4CBS 



66 



intense hobby with me than flying, and 
I've given as much thought and study 
to it as to my career in show business." 

This claim can easily be validated. 
Bob's great interest in this field stems 
from his father, Dr. Charles Clarence 
Cummings, M.D., and his mother, the 
Reverend Ruth Cummings. It is a mat- 
ter of record that the senior Cum- 
mingses were pioneer campaigners for 
vitamins long before the use of this 
food supplement became fashionable 
and mass-production set in. In those 
days, Bob's parents actually manufac- 
tured their own vitamins. 

One of the maxims of this family 
was: You are what you eat. And both 
parents reflected the wisdom of this 
teaching. Bob's lovely wife Mary, head 
of the home planning division for Nutri- 
Bio, recalls that his mother, at the age 
of seventy-five, was only slightly gray 
and still had her own teeth. 

Unlike many food and diet faddists. 
Bob does not over-simplify his message. 
He does not claim that this vitamin or 
that mineral or this exercise or that 
menu will produce results akin to re- 
juvenation. Nowhere does he advise: 
"Follow my routine and all your aches 
and ills will vanish, you'll be popular 
with the opposite sex, and you'll get 
promotions on your job." What he does 
have to say adds up to practical horse- 
sense: "Exercise, fresh air, sunshine . . . 
things that cost you absolutely nothing 
. . . are all very important. I wish 
people could be educated on the sub- 
ject of health as they are on the makeup 
of the atom or the political situation. 

"This country has gone vitamin- 
happy to a dangerous extent. People 
tell each other, 'You know, I'm taking 
a more potent pill than yours.' The 
other will answer, 'Oh, yeah? Maybe I 
better switch to your brand.' What they 
fail to understand is that, unless it's 
the vitamins a person's body needs, and 
it's taken in the right amounts, the in- 
take may be useless — in rare cases. 
harmful. Once people compared oper- 
ations. Now, it's food supplements." 

Generally, Bob prefers the term 
"food supplement" to vitamin. That is 
what the pills and capsules represent 
to him. And his face gets red when he 
gets on the subject of food fads. It is 
his boast that he has never gone in for 
a fad of any kind. 

"The protein tablets and organic 
vitamin-minerals I take daily," he 
points out, "are -merely additions to my 
regular diet to round out the nutrition 
I need for an active, busy life. A fan 
once wrote me asking, 'Is it true you 
eat only pills?' My return letter gave 
her my word that all the Cummings 
family sit down to regular, balanced 
meals of meat, vegetables and fruit. 
Mary does work out menus to cover the 
elements needed for good health. But. 
in spite of our care in diets and menus, 
the pressures of modern living often 
force us to eat on the run, which inter- 
feres with proper digestion. As a re- 
sult, we lose vitamins. That's where the 
pills and capsules come in as supple- 
ments to the regular diet." 

It has also been stressed by Bob. 
many times, that food alone, however 
scientifically prepared and supple- 



mented, can never replace an overall 
program for health. Nutri-Bio, he 
claims, set out to preach the doctrine 
of good health habits in every aspect. 
Mary and Bob are apparently dedi- 
cated to this cause. In times past, they 
set up foundations to research natural 
food products and their importance. 

"People have sometimes laughed at 
my preoccupation with the care and de- 
velopment of our national health," Bob 
says. "Now President Kennedy has 
come out emphatically on the need for 
building our physical standards. Presi- 
dent Eisenhower was also deeply in- 
terested in this field. I think a lot of 
people must have been appalled to 
learn that, of 200,000 students who were 
put through certain tests set by the 
Government, about half flunked out. 
Many schools are putting a new stress 
on the value of eating and exercising 
properly, on sufficient sleep, and the 
arts of relaxing. If each individual 
found a health program suited to his 
ability and needs, and followed it 
scrupulously, the entire health level of 
the nation would rise." 

When Mary married Bob in 1945. 
she became intere ! in food supple- 
ments and began to adopt a better regu- 
lated health-building routine. "I was 
an actress before I got married," she 
explains, "so, naturally, I knew my 
number-one asset was my appearance, 
energy and drive. Even before I met 
Bob, I was already trying to eat sensi- 
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and similar plans designed to bring 
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67 



"I'm the Oldest Man on TV" 



(Continued from page 22) 
that wonderful grin of his, which is 
young and full of bounce. It's true 
Dwayne never wanted to be an actor. 
It's true he considers himself a "grass- 
roots American" and something of a 
dud; but he looks very debonair in 
ascot and tweed jacket at the wheel 
of his T-bird, and he's dreaming of 
"a suave new phase in which I'll have 
a lot more ascots and striped blazers 
and black slacks — without a belt, of 
course — a wardrobe to match that 
Rolls-Royce with the license DH1, like 
Cary Grant's CGI and Frank Sinatra's 
FS2. I don't know what the 1 and 2 
mean, unless they indicate the line-up 
of cars in the garage, but I like the 
idea. I like the idea of several dinner 
jackets and of writing home from 
Cannes and Monte Carlo: 'Having a 
wonderful time and, yes, I might be 
induced — maybe — to make another pic- 
ture next year.' " 

Also on this dream trip, he's plan- 
ning to chase girls — real girls, not 
actresses — all over the world. A weekly 
show leaves little time for social life, 
and Dwayne has had to solve this prob- 
lem by dating the girls who show up 
on the series each week — Dobie's major 
interest being girls. Dwayne meets his 
new date Wednesdays at rehearsal, 
dates her by Friday and drops her by 
Sunday, because there's always a new 
name on the call sheet, and hopefully, 
she might turn out to be different. 

The trouble with actresses 

"Actresses," he says, "are an in- 
credible breed. Fun is out of the 
question. One beauty wants to talk 
profoundly about the Protestant Refor- 
mation. Another wants to be taken to 
some little one-act plays. They think 
it's kind of chic to be a part-time art 
lover or social worker, probably to dis- 
guise the fact that they're totally in- 
volved with their careers. 

"They don't make good dates be- 
cause they're not interested in you; 
they'd be terrible wives; their constant 
aim is to go somewhere to be seen. 
I'm seen thirty minutes every week 
on 190 outlets over the CBS network! 
I like to drive along the ocean or go 
to the park, visit the zoo, see a ball 
game. Can you imagine taking one of 
Dobie's girls to the ball game? 

"I haven't fallen in love for a long 
time. There was Dorothy Provine, but 
that was two years ago and even that 
wasn't like the love I knew when I 
was nineteen. I was madly in love then, 
with a plain, ordinary nice girl, who 
came from Marymount to the dance at 
our school. I was a poor dancer and I 
could think of nothing to say, but I 
loved her. I saw her a few weeks back 
in a coffee house, wearing long black 
stockings and a sort of anarchy suit. 
I tell you, I ran. Like Dobie, I don't 
have a girl — and like Dobie, I'm always 
T looking." 

g The one girl he understands is his 

sister Deirdre, twenty-one, who was 

just graduated from Immaculate Heart 
68 



Convent and is planning to get married. 

"We've been a very close family, 
actually, all of us individualists, all 
different, but we like to be together. 
I have my own apartment but I 
wouldn't be caught dead cooking, so 
I go home for breakfast and dinner. 
My mother says I'm home more now 
than when I lived there and, of course, 
one of my closest friends is my brother 
Darryl, even though he's now married. 

"It was Darryl who was the cause 
of it all — show business, I mean. He 
was taking a dancing lesson one day 
(he must have been five or six) when 
a movie studio hired a whole bunch 
of youngsters from the dancing school 
for Bing Crosby's 'The Star Maker.' 
Darryl got a pretty good part in that 
film and went on from there. 

"Then, when he began to graduate 
to adolescent parts, I took over on the 
juvenile parts. At ten, I made my debut 
as Claudette Colbert's son in 'The 
Secret Heart.' I played in 'The Happy 
Years,' and in 'The Boy With Green 
Hair,' and with Bob Cummings in 
'Montana Mike.' I was never a very 
good child actor — I couldn't create an- 
other character, as Darryl could. But 
parts were offered and the money was 
good. 

"No one in our family took it very 
big. My mother, of course, had to go 
with us to the studio — she spoke the 
language — but my dad never really 
knew we were actors. He's still pretty 
vague about it. He's an insurance 
broker and he's crazy abouj cars; he 
has a '53 De Soto he's depreciating 
over a ten-year period. Dad's the nut- 
tiest of the bunch — he thinks acting 
is sort of like loafing. . . . Then I grew 
out of kid parts and went on to Cathe- 
dral High and then to Loyola Univer- 
sity, a Jesuit school. 

"I was majoring in economics, plan- 
ning to be a professor or an economist. 
I was also crazy about Victorian litera- 
ture. Around school, they figured I was 
pretty square. I pledged Alpha Delta 
Gamma, but I'd be studying and miss 
the meetings. Besides, I wouldn't carry 
cigarettes around for the upper class- 
men or call them 'sir.' Pretty soon, 
they threw me out for not conforming. 
That was fine. I had plenty to do. I 
played a lot of tennis and some golf. 
Saturdays, I worked as cashier in a 
car wash, ten dollars a Saturday. 

"The man who runs this place is an 
old friend of my family, and I still 
go there every week and get my 
car washed. Today, when I was there, 
he told me I ought to come back and 
work at the old job. 'People think all 
actors are stuffed shirts,' he said. 'If 
they could see you working around 
here on Saturdays, they'd know you 
aren't a stuffed shirt. In a few Satur- 
days, you could change public opinion 
in the whole Glendale area!' He said 
he'd pay me a dollar-twenty an hour 
and I was tempted. But I had to turn 
him down. I spend my Saturdays study- 
ing script." 

Dwayne had completed his first year 
at Loyola when a leftover agent from 



his childhood suggested he go over to 
see Bob Cummings. Cummings was 
looking for a young kid for his show. 
"I wasn't so hot about the idea, but 
it was summer and I didn't have a job. 
The next thing I knew, I was making 
a pilot. And I'd no sooner started back 
to school than the series was sold." 

For a while, Dwayne was able to do 
both, work on the show and keep up 
his grades. He maintained a B average, 
was on the Dean's list, and kept in 
touch with his school friends who had 
gone into the Air Corps. Dwayne 
wanted to go, too, but asthma, which 
he's had since childhood, keeps him 4-F. 

He had one three-unit course which 
met Monday, Wednesday and Friday 
and, unfortunately, the series shot on 
Wednesday and Friday. After a while, 
the two jobs became impossible. Oc- 
casionally, he's wished he were back 
at Loyola and, last year, he threatened 
to leave Dobie and do just that. The 
reason? The bleached crewcut with 
which he was sentenced when he took 
on the role. 

"I've never found out whose idea 
that was," Dwayne says, "but someone 
thought bleaching my hair would make 
me look different than I'd looked on 
the Cummings show and also it would 
make me look younger. It made me 
look older and strictly a freak. I have 
a dark complexion and dark eyebrows, 
my eyes are sort of green and the white 
hair was shocking. On screen, I faded 
into the background. Off screen, I wore 
a hat. That thatch could have ruined 
my career. 

"Last year, when I took my stand 
against the bleach job, the agency peo- 
ple were in a panic. They said it would 
ruin the image, how could we explain 
it? I told them I wasn't going to ex- 
plain it, I'd just as soon go back to 
college. So, last year, on the show, the 
hair was sort of brown. This year it's 
black as it is. And, so far, nobody in 
the viewing audience has said one 
word." 



Dobie grows older, too 

The hair isn't the only change. When 
the series started three years ago, 
Dobie was seventeen (Dwayne, twenty- 
four), a scatter-brained kid who stole 
money from his dad's cash register, 
never thought of a job — thought, in- 
deed, only of girls. With Dwayne press- 
ing, his producers have allowed him 
to mature five years in three and the 
character has come a little closer to 
the actor who plays it. To remain vital, 
Dwayne points out, a series must be 
ever changing, like life. 

But the fact remains that the series 
has forced the actor into the role of 
comedian, when he wants to do serious 
acting, and TV methods outrage his 
sense of perfectionism. It hurts to spend 
ten minutes filming a tough scene he'd 
like to rehearse for two hours. It hurts 
when critics pan the show. Sometimes 
he feels that critics only like shows 
with low ratings: "The critics seem 
to think these must be great artistic 



triumphs which the public hasn't brains 
enough to dig. Maybe they're right. 
Dobie originally was a brilliant satire 
with social implications like 'Alice in 
Wonderland.' Nobody got the satire, 
and the show slid into the family 
groove. 

"Of course, you should never let 
critics worry you. When I was a little 
kid, I did a play at Pasadena Play- 
house, prior to a possible opening on 
Broadway — 'This Proud Young World,' 
with an all-juvenile cast. Reviewer 
Frank Eng praised the play, he said 
Darryl was excellent. On the contrary, 
he said, his brother Dwayne was as 
inept as Darryl was outstanding, that 
I'd given an unbelievably poor per- 
formance. This was the second night 
of the show, the night after the open- 
ing. I needed all the encouragement 
I could get. I read this review, folded 
the paper and went out on stage. Later, 
I made up my mind not to pay any 
attention to reviews — you know, of all 
the people in the play, Darryl and I 
are the only ones still working? 

"There is a big turnover in show 
business, especially in series TV, which 
is a grind. You must produce a feature 
a week for the amount of money al- 
lowed. A volume business. We make 
it as good as we can. So far as I'm 
concerned, the weekly series will even- 
tually go down the drain because it 
doesn't have that much scope — you 
can't make thirty-six great half-hours. 
You're trapped." 

Plenty of other series stars have felt 
trapped, too, but most actors playing 
an established character — such as Wy- 
att Earp, or Perry Mason, or Paladin 
— just naturally exploit that character 
and become identified with it. Dwayne, 
who is interested in Victorian litera- 
ture, in art, music and sports, wouldn't 
be found dead exploiting Dobie and 
is always faintly embarrassed when 
anyone identifies him. 

"I'm not a teenager anymore," he 
protests. "By the time you get to be 
a success in this business, you've out- 
grown what you've achieved the suc- 
cess doing. A successful juvenile is too 
old for juvenilia. Ditto the leading 
man." Yet the question remains: What 
will he do when they start wooing him 
for another contract? 

"There are naturally inducements 
they give people who stick with a show 
five or six years — strong inducements," 
he reflects. "Richard Boone . . . Ray- 
mond Burr ... I don't know if I'd 
be strong enough to resist. You get 
hungry three times a day, you have 
to provide for your old age, and I'm 
a worrier. I hope I can remind myself 
that three years of a successful series 
have done for an actor all they can 
do . . . that an actor's sense of security 
comes from something superbly done 
. . . that, from here on, it's financial 
gravy but it's not getting me into seri- 
ous adult acting where I want to be." 

If Dwayne listens to those arguments, 

we'll understand. Two years without 

love is long enough. It's enough to 

make any man— or woman — feel old. 

—Jane Ardmore 

Dobie Gillis is seen over CBS-TV, 
Tuesdays at 8:30 P.M. E.S.T. 




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69 



Do You Know This Man? 



(Continued from page 58) 
initial $1,000 they were given to "bet" 
with — and Eddie and the Major split 
their winnings. 

All in all, they'd put on a terrific 
show for the viewing millions and their 
brief interlude was fun for everyone. 

A lot — an awful lot — has happened 
since then. 

Little Eddie Hodges, who sang and 
joked and laughed his way into the 
hearts of so many Americans at home, 
inevitably drew the attention of the 
star-makers on Broadway. Shortly after 
his departure from Name That Tune, 
he was auditioned for a role in the 
smash Broadway musical "The Music 
Man." He won the role handily and 
established himself as a genuinely com- 
petent young actor. 

Later, Eddie went on to star in TV 
specials, made his motion picture debut 
with Frank Sinatra and. still later, re- 
turned to Broadway. At the moment. 
Eddie — no longer the young, wide-eyed 
tad of a boy but a sprouting teenager — 
is continuing his schooling, but there 
is little doubt a huge and successful 
career lies ahead of him. 

Name That Tune itself continued its 
climb in the ratings and was at the 
zenith of its massive popularity when 
the appalling quiz show scandals broke 
across the nation's headlines and it — 
along with every other big giveaway 
show — was hastily yanked from the air. 

As for George de Witt, the veteran 
comic entertainer had little trouble in 
finding a new TV berth, and, before 
long, was back in his emcee role, guid- 
ing the newly created Be Our Guest 
show along the airlengths. But trouble 
continued to plague him. Before long, 
he became embroiled in a public head- 
line-grabbing battle with the beautiful 
Mary Ann Mobley, who — fresh from her 
triumph as Miss America of 1959 — had 
joined the program as its featured 
singer. 

In a show of tears, in which she ac- 
cused George of issuing an "it's Mary 
Ann or me" ultimatum, the Mississippi 
belle quit. Less than twenty-four hours 
later, George himself gave seven weeks' 
notice that he, too, was through. The 
show, he said, had no format. And be- 
sides, he couldn't seem to get along 



with the show's producers. Since then 
— by now it was the spring of 1960 — 
George de Witt has had no show of his 
own and has devoted himself almost ex- 
clusively to night-club acts, mostly in 
Florida and New York. 

And John Hershel Glenn? 

John Glenn, as perhaps every literate 
person in the world knows today, went 
on to heights hardly dreamed of a 
generation ago and unmatched by any 
other American today. 

In the years since 1957, the doughty 
Marine Astronaut soared to fantastic 
fame, far and away eclipsing everyone 
else who shared those lighter moments 
with him on Name That Tune. 

It wasn't easy. 

Soon after his epochal, record-shat- 
tering jet flight from Los Angeles to 
Brooklyn, John Glenn joined with 
thousands of other pilots in the gruel- 
ing competition to be named one of 
America's famed Project Mercury 
Astronauts. It was a little harder for 
Glenn than for most of the others. He 
was then thirty-six years old and re- 
garded as something of an old-timer — 
too old for the body-torturing training 
program he would have to endure. 

Glenn soon proved them wrong. 
Along with six others, he became a 
part of the country's vaunted Astro- 
naut team and plunged into the long, 
tedious rigors of nreparation for an 
orbital flight around the earth. 

Most of the tests would terrify an 
ordinary man. One involved lying on a 
couch in a Rube Goldberg-ish centrifu- 
gal machine that spun, tossed, somer- 
saulted and pitched its prisoner at 
blindingly dizzy speeds. The battering, 
teeth-chattering ordeal, aimed at simu- 
lating conditions of rocketing through 
the vast sea of space, managed, of 
course, to shake Glenn thoroughly. But 
it otherwise left him in fine fettle. 

Nor was he fazed by the seemingly 
endless hazards of practicing split- 
second escapes through the narrow 
portholes of dummy space capsules 
bobbing precariously in the ocean. 

These were only some of the tests. 
There were others. He soared into the 
heavens with the other Astronauts 
aboard C-131 transport planes that 
would suddenly dive, pull up jarringly 



70 



ED SULLIVAN'S OWN STORY! 

WHY I'LL NEVER 

MAKE UP WITH JACK PAAR 

• The Quiz Contestant 
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and dive yet again to float the astro- 
nauts in midair at zero gravity to test 
their reactions to weightlessness. 

Through all of these, through every 
devastating test, Glenn — and the others 
— emerged with flying colors. 

But then, of course, everything be- 
hind him had honed him for the ordeals 
he was then facing. 

Here was a man who had flown 59 
fighter bomber missions in the Pacific 
during World War II and earned three 
Distinguished Flying Crosses. 

When the Korean War came, he was 
back in the thick of the fighting again, 
flying 100 missions. At war's end, he 
had won an incredible 17 Air Medals 
and two more DFCs. 

After the war, Glenn turned to test 
piloting, and that, in turn, led him 
down the path to Project Mercury. 

Trim and leathery-tough — standing 
five-foot-ten and running at least two 
miles every morning to keep at his best 
weight of 180 pounds — John Glenn him- 
self has always attributed his daunt- 
less and icy calm, in the shadow of 
death, to faith and understanding. 

He is not afraid, he told close friends, 
because he understands, and when he 
does not understand, he finds out. For 
example. Col. Glenn — ever' a strong re- 
ligious man — early in his Astronaut 
career, went to his Presbyterian min- 
ister to find out whether it was ethically 
right to tamper with the outer reaches 
of space. Only when he was assured he 
was not offending God, did he continue. 

As Project Mercury rolled along, 
there were moments when the public, 
if not Glenn himself, felt somewhat 
frustrated for him. 

Virtually every reporter who covered 
the Astronauts' training came away with 
the impression that Col. John Glenn 
was the "pappy" of the seven-man team. 
A favorite description was that he was 
the "leader among equals." Everyone 
was sure that, when America launched 
its first sub-orbital flight down the 
South Atlantic range, Col. Glenn would 
be aboard the rocket. Instead, it was 
Navy Commander Alan Shepard Jr. 
Then came the second sub-orbital flight, 
and again all eyes turned to John Glenn. 
And again, he was denied. This time, 
the Astronaut was Capt. Virgil Grissom. 

Since the Russians had sent two "cos- 
monauts" around the planet — Major 
Yuri Gagarin, who orbited the earth 
once, and Major Gherman S. Titov, who 
made the fabulous flight 17 times — they 
were beginning to say of Glenn, "al- 
ways the bridesmaid, never the bride." 

But John Glenn never lost faith in 
himself or sight of the larger goals, 
and neither did his family. His wife 
Anna, a childhood sweetheart whom he 
had met in his hometown of New Con- 
cord, Ohio — at the tender age of six — 
and his two children, John David, 15. 
and Carolyn Ann, 13. 

Time flew and John Glenn's day of 
greatness finally came, and, with a 
mighty, flaming roar, he zoomed into 
the firmament. 

Into the bright blue heavens above. 

Into history. — John R. Pascal 



w 



Mr 



it 



(Continued from page 7) 
an artesian well on his Double Rain- 
bow Ranch. . . . Ernie Kovacs landed 
on his cigar while doing the Twist at 
the "West Side Story" preem party. 
. . . Are the great talents of Sam Jaff e 
being wasted in Ben Casey? . . . Joan 
Crawford's life set for April airing. 

What's this about Connie Stevens 
being bugged by Warner's young 
Kathy Bennett doing a ditto on her 
ponytail? Purrs Connie, "No one can 
make it in show business by being a 
carbon copy." Sasses Kathy, "I've been 
wearing a ponytail since I was five." 
Now, girls, no hair-pulling! 

MGM cocky over their upcoming 
series Zero One. Take Kildare, say they, 
and double it in spades! . . . Chuck 
Connors and wife have put the "No 
Trespass" sign on their private lives. 
"We're trying to work out our differ- 
ences," says Connors, "but it's strictly 
between the two of us." Sadly, it's now 
between the two of them and a judge. 
The divorce papers have been filed. . . .. 
Has the leader of the clan flipped his 
hair-piece over that Roaring 20's piece 
of work? And vice-versa? . . . It's 
still "no marriage" for Troy Dona- 
hue and Suzanne Pleshette but it's 
"still marriage" for Colleen and 
Jimmie Rodgers. Ty Hardin can't 
be serious when he says, "Perhaps 
Ann-Margret and I are getting too 
serious." Everyone knows the Swedish 
doll, a strong contender for the Mary 
Martin role in "Sound of Music," 
doesn't believe in "steadying." To cap 
it, she's been dating financier Bert 
Sugarman, and since she dyed her hair 
red, the family icebox has been raided 
night after night by other late dates. 
Question, please: Why do her eyes light 
up when you say "Avalon"? 

Fabian's beard for "Mr. Hobbs 
Takes a Vacation" is a phony. Scared 
the fuzz'd play "hob" with his love- 
life, which (at present) includes Kathy 
Kirsch, Kitty Reagan and back-home 
beauty, Barbara Magnelius. . . . B'nai 
B'rith's "Man of Year" — Dick Boone, 
who also cops a special award for toil- 
ing on behalf of the 50th anniversary 
of Navy Avy-ashon. . . . Gardner Mc- 
Kay's dog-pal, "Pussycat," finally made 
the scene in Adventures In Paradise. 
So help us Hannah, Gard framed the 
call sheet, which said pigs, cows and 
chicks must be on set at 6 a.m. sharp, 
but Pussycat could breeze in at 7 ! 

Dinah Shore keeping herself too 
busy for regrets. She's got herself con- 
tinually booked into clubs, first the 
Eden Roc in Miami and then the 
Riviera Hotel in Las Vegas. She will 
film her May TV show at the Riviera. 
... If you notice, actors don't knock 
TV. Video accounts for the bread and 
butter of well over fifty percent. . . . 
The word is that Frankie Sinatra Jr. 
(Continued on page 72) 



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(Continued from page 71) 
(there really is one), now at U.S.C., is 
about to stretch his wings and this will 
confuse the entertainment scene no end. 
. . . Wrapping up the Sinatra news, son- 
in-law Tommy Sands has been signed 
to come back again and again to the 
Como show on NBC, and over at CBS 
they are talking about starring Tommy 
in a series to be titled Young Man In A 
Hurry. 

Robert Wagner putting a lot of 
space between himself and his heart- 
aches. May make his permanent home 
in Rome. . . . But Efrem Zimbalist 
Jr. likes convenience. His ex-wife, 
Stephanie, lives just down the street 
and this makes it easy to visit with the 
children. . . . ABC strong on Leave It To 
Beaver. Has already ordered 39 new 
episodes for next year. . . . Fred Mac- 
Murray is now twice a grandfather. 
. . . Peter Lind Hayes leaves the 
family hearth on March 4th to narrate 
an NBC special, "Regards to George 
M. Cohan." So far the talents of 
Dorothy Loudon and Danny Mehan 
have been contracted. Steve Allen, 
man without a network, now occupying 
himself with a Broadway musical. . . . 
Ingrid Bergman has signed with CBS 
to do a dramatic show next season. Gets 
$100,000. 

At La Scala Restaurant, David 
Hedison thought he spied Ina Balin, 
crept up behind the girl and gave her 
a resounding buss. The object of this 
attention was not Ina. It happened to 
be Madlyn Rhue. After Dave made 
his apologies, he asked for her phone 
number and got it. Madlyn shrugged, 
"I'm not sure whether it was a mistake 
or a new approach . . . but I had to 
admit, it was effective." 

When Rose Marie was Baby Rose 
Marie, she wore a big bow in her hair 
and it started a style trend of "Rose 
Marie ribbons." Now that she's on 
The Dick Van Dyke Show, she wears a 
tiny bow and that has started a new 
line of velvet hair bows. . . . Pardon 
her Hungarian, says Zsa Zsa Gabor, 
mulling over a night-club act, but she 
wants to be more than a "glamour 
girl." "I vood like to sing, and dance 
and do zee whole shmear." 

Gene Barry wants more entertain- 
ers to go abroad and says they should 
do it at scale rates, for international 
goodwill. Gene, whose Bat Masterson 
is large in South America, has been 
tapped for the "Distinguished Oversea- 
manship" medal by the Brazil Herald, 
the first time a Yanqui has so been 
honored. . . . Sighted on the set of The 
Outlaws: A sign reading, "There Are 
No Outlaws, Only Misdirected Cow- 
boys!" . . . Jane Morgan's reason for 
haunting the Perry Como set: He 
makes me cry! Perry Como's reason for 
liking her visits: She makes me laugh. 
. . . Margaret O'Brien spotted for the 
first time in eleven years on her old 
stamping grounds at MGM, doing a Dr. 
Kildare. . . . Steve McNally worrying 
over 20-year-old son, Horace. "He sold 
his first script and it makes a woman 
out to be the heavy. Does this mean he's 
carrying the torch for some gal?" 

Jack Lemmon still anxious to do a 
TV special but no sponsor interest. . . . 



Bob Hope remains the king of ratings 
for the second year. Last season he held 
three top ratings and is about to set as 
high a mark this season. In his first 
production, he captured 54 percent of 
the audience — more than NBC's rival 
networks had combined. . . . Natalie 
Wood, always a strong-minded lass, 
seems to have lost her mind as well as 
heart to Warren Beatty. He's advis- 
ing her on business matters and she in 
turn is giving her business associates a 
tough time. . . . Look for a big look at 
Sophia Loren on NBC — they are pre- 
paring a full hour of candid shots on 
her personal life. . . . Mitch Miller 
gave Gloria Lambert a new contract, 
making her a regular for the rest of the 
season. . . . Max Liebman has prom- 
ised CBS-TV a smasheroo of a comedy 
series next year with a far-out format. 
Each week he will parody some well- 
known tale such as the story of Robin 
Hood or Frankenstein. . . . Hugh 
O'Brian may confound his public and 
turn up in a comedy series. 

The young actress to keep an eye on 
is Dorothy Hackett, who turned up 
this season in Ben Casey, Twilight Zone, 
Gunsmoke, The New Breed and The 
Defenders. She played roles ranging 
from a Mexican dope fiend to the 
sophisticated wife of a drama critic. 
This is the same gal who won three 
major critic awards last year in an off- 
Broadway play, "Call Me By My Right- 
ful Name," and then turned down the 
chance to play in the movie version. A 
slender gal with burnt almond eyes, 
she says, "I'm choosey about movies but 
TV you do for a living and don't have 
to be choosey." . . . Arthur Godfrey 
being paged for a new show titled 
Humantics. 

Joan Patrick, TV and movie star- 
let, almost lost her ever-lovin' life when 
her car skidded on muddy Wonderland 
Drive. A gallant motorist pulled up, 
carried her through the mud to his car 
and drove her to safety. When she asked 
for his name, while offering her thank- 
yous, the gallant said, "Oh, no, no pub- 
licity. My wife simply would never 
understand." . . . John Forsythe, the 
unusual show-biz dad, not holding out 
the helping hand of nepotism to his 20- 
year-old son Dall, now working at the 
Charles Theater in Boston. "Make it on 
your own or no dice," says John, to 
which the offspring adds, "Amen!" 

Gertrude Berg's "Jahfa Produc- 
tions" due for a name change. It's 
derived from the names of five grand- 
children, Joshua, Annie, Henry, Frank 
and Adam. But daughter is expecting 
again. . . . Meanwhile: No twins (as 
were once predicted!) for the Roger 
Smiths. But it's a boy — named Dallas 
for Roger's dad. . . . Julie London 
and Bobby Troup will give her two 
daughters a baby brother or sister in 
late April. . . . Ziva Rodann and 
George Montgomery still dating. 
. . . The old Four Star Playhouse is 
heading for a revival. Charles Boyer 
and David Niven will share the 
honors with two female stars. . . . The 
Twist new? 'Tain't so, says Yoga 
authority Richard Hittleman. "It's 
a basic Yoga position dating back more 
than a thousand years." That's all! 



"Slander!" 

(Continued from page 17) 
the defendant who sat in the witness 
chair. The New York County Supreme 
Court was a little more crowded than 
usual this day, but much quieter. 
There were no coughs, no whispers; 
nothing that would make the spec- 
tators miss any of the testimony, any 
gesture of the defendant. This was 
their chance, they knew, to see what 
the King of the Night People was really 
like. 

For this was the trial of Jack Paar; 
the $300,000 suit for "slander" which 
had been brought against him by Pupi 
Campo. 

Pupi was in the courtroom, too, 
watching Jack. Watching and remem- 
bering and hardly believing that some- 
thing begun in 1955 was finally to be 
resolved after six years. 

It had all started so simply, Pupi re- 
membered. Jack was then starring on 
CBS-TV's Morning Show and Pupi was 
the bandleader. In fact, everything was 
going so well then that Pupi simply 
couldn't imagine having a care in the 
world. 

He wasn't only a bandleader. It was 
while working with Pupi that Jack 
first got the idea of chatting with the 
cast, as a panel, with which he's had 
such success on his nightly NBC-TV 
Jack Paar Show. Pupi's Cuban accent 
and the way he'd occasionally trip over 
English had been a perfect ploy for 
Jack's humor. Newspaper reviewers 
saw the show and praised Pupi. as well 
as Jack. 

Pupi was going far, everybody in 
show business said. So far. in fact, that 
Jack raised his salary from $275 a 
week to $833. 

But — even better than Pupi's suc- 
cess — he was also in love. His girl was 
Betty Clooney, sister of Rosemary 
and singer on the show. 

And that's when all the bad things 
happened. 

Betty went home to California on 
vacation and singer-comedienne Edie 
Adams was hired as her temporary re- 
placement. One day, while Betty was 
still away, Jack told Pupi he wanted 
to see him. "I'm letting Betty go," he 
said. "I want you to be the first one to 
know." 

"But why?" Pupi asked. "Every- 
thing was going so well!" 

"Look, Pupi, I don't want any ro- 
mance on the show. And Edie's more 
versatile. She can sing, she does com- 
edy ... she stays," Jack told him. 

After Betty was dropped. Pupi got 
more and more unhappy. He told 
friends: "Everything was going okay 
until we told him we were going to- 
gether. And the way he let her go. 
After working for him a year, he 
couldn't even tell Betty himself. He 
had to have his producer fire her." 

When Jack heard Pupi's complaints, 
he again told Pupi he wanted to see 
him. "I know you think I fired Betty 
because you're going with her," he said. 
"But that's not true. I've told you, Edie 
is more versatile and that's what the 
show needs. Maybe it was cruel. But 




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is there ever a nice way of giving any- 
one notice? 

"If you had gotten married, one of 
you would have had to go, anyhow. I 
don't want married couples on this 
show." 

Six weeks later, Pupi was fired. 
The shows were getting too crowded 
with guest stars, Jack told him. Maybe 
they could use Pupi once or twice a 
week as a regular guest, rather than as 
a regular member. But the shows were 
just getting too crowded. 

"And, Pupi," Jack said, "if reporters 
ask you what happened, just tell them 
you want to spend more time with the 
band." 

What do you do with a thing like 
this, Pupi wondered. Do you keep quiet 
and be a good guy and maybe he'll 
take you back? Or do you do what you 
feel like doing — get mad, let everybody 
know? 

Pupi got mad. He told friends he was 
fired because he was going to marry 
Betty. He said he knew, when she was 
let go, that he'd be next. 

"Oh, no," Jack said. "It's purely a 
matter of talent. We can't find any- 
thing for the boy to do. I told him I 
didn't want to continue him on the 
show at the high salary he was getting. 
I have to be forced to say this, but 
neither Betty nor Pupi are top-flight 
talent." 

A few nights later, Pupi and his 
band were playing for a party at the 
swank Colony restaurant in New York. 
Columnist Earl Wilson asked Pupi 
what had happened with Jack. And 
Pupi told his side. Then a reporter 
was sent to check with Jack — and Jack, 
as Pupi later said, "went wild." He 
told Pupi, "Why did you do this to me? 
You'll be sorry!" 

Jack then told the reporter Pupi 
couldn't sing, couldn't dance and had 
no talent. "I couldn't use him on the 
live show as a bandleader. He couldn't 
read music or lead a band on TV. Once 
he's out there, he doesn't know what 
to do." 

Pupi sued. . . . 

Now, six years later, in the court- 
room, Pupi heard an attorney ques- 
tion Jack: "What would you say was 
Mr. Campo's talent? What was his 
act?" 

"As I recall," Jack answered, "it 
was waving his hips in front of the 
band." 

"Mr. Paar, are you a comedian?" 

"I have been called a comedian in 
the Congress of the United States." 

"Now, Mr. Paar, did you reach the 
conclusion that Mr. Campo couldn't 
sing?" 

"I wouldn't hire him as a singer." 
Jack paused then and smiled, adding: 
"But you cheer for a guy who tries." 

"Did you reach the conclusion that 
Mr. Campo couldn't dance?" 

"Not as a solo performer." 

Couldn't dance, Pupi thought. / 
came to this country just because I 
could dance. That was back in 1940. 
in his native Cuba. He'd already been 
in some movies and night clubs in 
Havana when an American press agent 
saw him. The funny thing was, he 
wasn't even working the night he was 



"discovered"— he was just a guest at 
a party, dancing with his date. Next 
thing he knew, he was in New York. 

Of course, he'd had plenty of experi- 
ence — he'd been in show business 
since he was seventeen. But. even so. 
he'd never expected things to go so 
well for him in America. With his 
band, he worked in most of the top 
night clubs. He played the Paramount 
and the Capitol theaters in New York. 
And television — he was on the Jack 
Carter show and the old Milton Berle 
show and so many others. 

Even Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis, 
when they first became a team, had 
wanted him in their act. They said 
they'd make it a trio. But Pupi said 
no. He was doing fine. He thought he 
was too big for them. 

He was playing at Bill Miller's 
Riviera (then one of the East Coast's 
flossier night clubs) when Jack saw 
him. This was one job he wouldn't say 
no to. This one was going to insure his 
future. . . . 

The present: No future? 

Jack was still on the witness stand 
and Pupi heard the attorney asking 
him, "Was the romance between Betty 
and Pupi good for the show?" 

"Yes," Jack answered. "I had no 
objection to their getting married. All 
the world loves a lover. But being 
married and being on the show, that's 
a whole new argument. That's not the 
way to run a TV show — or a depart- 
ment store, you know." 

The lawyer waited for the specta- 
tors' laughter to clear away, then 
asked, "You've been around show busi- 
ness for a long time? For an extensive 
time? 

"What do you mean, 'extensive?' ' 

"For about twenty-eight years. Mr. 
Paar?" 

"Yes," Jack said. "About that, with 
ups and downs." 

"Do you know any married coupler 
in show business?" 

"Such as?" Jack asked. 

"Burns and Allen, Mr. Paar?" 

"But" — Jack was very excited now 
— "but they control their own show!" 

"And how about Lucille Ball and 
Desi Arnaz?" the lawyer asked. 

Very animated, shooting out his left 
hand to make his point, Jack told him : 
"See . . . there . . . you proved my 
point. They're divorced!" 

Divorced, Pupi thought. We'll never 
get divorced. Our marriage is the only 
good thing that came out of this. 

Betty would always stay by him. 
Pupi knew that. She had proved it 
when she married him four months 
after he was dropped from the Paar 
show. Jobs were already beginning to 
get scarce, but that couldn't stop her 
from becoming his wife. Or from 
having his children. Carlos, Carrie and 
Cathy Ann. Three little funny com- 
binations of her Irish and his Cuban 
ancestry. And they were all happy, too. 
Except for this thing. 

He wished he didn't have to sue Jack. 
But he had decided long ago that he 
had to. "After all," he had reasoned, 
"it was terrible things he said about 



me. When a big person like that, some- 
one you've worked for, says you have 
no talent, who'll hire you?" 

Nobody, Pupi had found out. Since 
the day Jack made those statements, 
he hadn't had a single television offer. 
"I'll take anything anyone offers me," 
he said. He took some night-club 
bookings with his band. His salary 
was cut to half what it used to be, 
before all this happened. 

That's why he was here today, in 
court . . . because, if it was proved 
Jack slandered him, maybe he'd get 
more work. Maybe his "reputation" 
would be restored. . . . 

"After Betty left the show," Jack 
was testifying, "we could not convince 
Pupi that she was let go because Edith 
Adams was better for the show. Pupi's 
actions became more offensive, more 
obscene. He began heckling his own 
people, the people he worked with." 

"Did Mr. Campo have talent?" the 
lawyer questioned. 

With a wry look and a wrinkled 
forehead, Jack thought for a moment: 
"Talent is a very loose word." 

"Well, was Pupi a talented TV per- 
former?" 

"A TV personality, not a performer," 
Jack answered. 

/ was always a performer before, 
Pupi told himself. Before all this. Now 
I get one job, then I wait months for 
the next one. And no television. With 
three children, you need TV work. 
That added income is very important. 
We spend what I make. There's no 
money to save. 

"But it's not just the money," Pupi 
had explained. "It's a blow to your 
ego, you know? You want to run away. 
That's what we did. We moved to 
Florida, bought a home there, got as 
far away from all this as we could." 

He had come back for the trial. . . . 

Suddenly, the judge turned to Jack. 
"You may go, Mr. Paar." 

"You mean it's all over?" Jack asked. 

"Yes, it's all over." 

"You mean," Jack said, "that's all 
there is to it?" 

"Yes." 

"Gee," Jack grinned, "that's not the 
way Perry Mason does it." 

Jack Paar's day in court was ended. 
The jury subsequently found a $15,000 
verdict against him. They probably 
reasoned that — if it were true that Pupi 
had no talent — Jack would have fired 
him sooner, instead of keeping him on 
the show for a year and a half. Jack 
may appeal the verdict . . . but. at 
least for now, he was off the stand. 

It was almost four o'clock. Jack had 
to hurry to a rehearsal of his show. He 
walked over to the bench and picked up 
his double-zippered, tan leather brief- 
case. It's a big case. On one side, the 
golden letters "NBC" are engraved. 
On the other side is the network's 
multi-colored peacock symbol — the sign 
of "living color." Surrounded by his 
wife Miriam and his lawyers. Jack 
Paar carried his briefcase out of the 
courtroom into the street. . . . 

And Pupi Campo? He went home to 
wait for television bookings. As of this 
writing, none had yet come. 

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75 




Behind the Break-up: 

The Pictures 

That Shook Hollywood 



16 



He brought shame to the D.A.'s wife . . . murdered an old 
shopkeeper . . . viciously stabbed his idealistic lawyer. 
Who? Fabian, that's who! In the Bus Stop episode, last 
December, called "A Lion Walks Among Us" (originally, 
"Told by an Idiot"— till ABC-TV decided that was just 
too much). Though it was a violently dramatic role any 
seasoned actor would love, many viewers objected to see- 
ing their favorite teenager as a psycho. So, apparently, 
did Bob Marcucci — who thought he'd raised his boy to be 
a singer. Was it these TV scenes that exploded the bomb 
between the Fabulous Fabian and his discoverer-manager? 




If You Think Fabian Is Only Kidding 



(Continued from page 25) 
the togetherness ends. These two were 
like father and son — closer, in fact, 
because there was not the distance of 
age. Perhaps big brother and kid 
brother would be more exact. 

How then, could this rift happen? 
Their friends, and people who have 
worked with them professionally, claim 
no one thing is to blame. They know 
it would take more than one blow-off 
to break these two up. For the real 
story behind this split, we must go back 
four years to a casual meeting that was 
to change two lives forever. 

Bob Marcucci had been visiting 
friends in Philadelphia. Looking over 
at the steps next door, he noticed a 
fifteen-year-old who seemed bowed with 
the burdens of the world. Something 
about the boy hit Bob. He crossed over 
and began talking to the boy, who told 
him his name was Fabian Forte. The 
more he talked to him, the more in- 
trigued he became. "What's wrong?" 
he asked finally. "Why are you so 
sad?" 

"My father's in the hospital with a 
heart attack," Fabian answered simply. 

"I'm sorry," Marcucci said. He talked 
to the boy for a while, trying to take 
his mind off his troubles. Before leav- 
ing, he asked the big question, "Can 
you sing — are you interested in being 
a singer?" 

The boy looked shocked. "I can't 
sing," Fabian told him candidly. "All I 
can think about right now is my father." 

He couldn't sing, but— 

In spite of Fabian's answer, Marcucci 
was sure he had what it would take. 
When Domenic Forte, the father, came 
home from the hospital, Marcucci ap- 
proached him and the family. At first 
they were skeptical. Even though Bob 
had been introduced to them by their 
good friends and neighbors, Mr. and 
Mrs. John Palmieri, they weren't sure 
they could trust his judgment. They 
didn't want their boy to be hurt going 
after something he couldn't get. And 
why should they believe he could make 
it as a singer? He made fine grades in 
other subjects but he had flunked out 
for the school chorus. It finally took 
Bob's uncle, Benny Oquita, to convince 
the Fortes. "Bob will be a father, a 
brother and a friend as well as a guide 
for your boy," he told them. "Before 
you know it, Fabian will be a big 
star . . ." 

It was no idle boast. Marcucci has 
the gift of star-making — and also of 
friendships. He meant every promise 
he made to the Fortes. 

His management of Frankie Avalon 
(who is, of course, the third man — 
the one at the right! — in the striking 
picture which opens this story) was 
already a dramatic proof of his 
abilities. Now he took Fabian Forte in 
hand. With the help of his partner, 
Peter DeAngelis, Marcucci worked tire- 
lessly to teach him to control his voice 
and bring out every originality of man- 
ner and style. Later they sent him into 



New York for lessons from a top vocal 
coach. 

Fabian became, in a sense, the crea- 
tion of Bob Marcucci. It was Marcucci 
who decided he use the single name, 
Fabian. "More intriguing," he said. 
Marcucci selected the clothes Fabe was 
to wear, the songs he would sing, the 
places where he would be seen. Down 
to the last detail, Marcucci studied and 
acted to further the boy's career. Fabe 
never complained. He was grateful to 
Bob and he always spoke loyally of his 
mentor and friend. "Bob knows what's 
best for me," he often declared. "I 
never even dreamed of being a profes- 
sional singer until he came along and 
said, 'You can do it.' Bob knows what 
the score is, and I'm all for him . . ." 

Soon Fabe was cutting records for 
Chancellor, the Marcucci-DeAngelis 
company. When "I'm a Man" was re- 
leased, disc jockeys agreed it had the 
makings of a hit. Thousands of teen-age 
girls rushed to the stores to buy it. The 
voice of Fabian was heard throughout 
the land. Marcucci shrewdly booked 
him on the Dick Clark show, and ar- 
ranged for a series of record hops. A 
careful blueprint to stardom was being 
followed. "Turn Me Loose" brought 
Fabian his first million-sale "gold 
record" and glowing receptions every- 
where he stopped on a cross-country 
tour. By 1959, less than a year after he 
auditioned for Marcucci, Fabian was 
number-one with the fans and they had 
begun to refer to him as "the fabulous 
one." 

All this while, Marcucci was doing 
more than managing Fabian. True to 
his promise to the Fortes, he kept a 
sharp, affectionate eye on the lad. A boy 
of 16, he reasoned, could hardly be left 
to make his own decisions. So Bob made 
them for him. Unlike other young stars, 
Fabian traveled with no personal en- 
tourage. Rick Nelson, for instance, al- 
ways had a couple of buddies along 
when he went on the road. And Elvis 
Presley took several pals with him. 
Fabe, however, was completely de- 
pendent on Bob's companionship. And 
Bob sent almost daily reports to the 
Fortes, who were naturally anxious 
about their son. It was good to know 
the youngster had a devoted friend who 
would protect him from infatuated 
young girls (Bob was ever the watchful 
chaperone on Fabe's dates) and see to 
it that he ate properly and got enough 
rest and recreation. Fabe's mother often 
demanded of her son, "Are you giving 
Bob any trouble?" All seemed perfectly 
harmonious in the Marcucci-Forte 
camp. 

Then Fabian went to Hollywood to 
make his first movie, "Hound Dog 
Man." A tough schedule of work was 
before him. His life amid the glamour 
of the movies was full of details, ten- 
sions and responsibilities, few of them 
amusing or exciting. On occasion, he 
dated pert Annette Funicello or Judy 
Harriet, a starlet, but always under the 
close supervision of Bob. Hollywood 
reporters, experienced in the foibles 
of human nature, especially when it is 



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77 



involved in show business, were quick 
to make mental notes of this. They 
noticed, too, the way Fabian would 
glance at Bob for help when anyone 
asked him a direct question. How long 
could this last, they wondered? What 
happens when this kid begins to grow 
up and feel his oats? But then, seeing 
the bond of genuine affection between 
these two, they shrugged off the ques- 
tions. 

By late 1960, the growing business 
of Chancellor Records was weighing 
heavy on Bob Marcucci. He had less 
time to go on the road with his talented 
young charge. Finally he found it 
necessary to ask Tom Marotta, formerly 
in the promotion department of the 
record company, to travel with Fabian. 
Looking back, this innocent move seems 
to take on a new significance. The open- 
ing wedge, purely in the interest of 
business, had come. Fabian was no 
longer quite as dependent on Bob as 
before. Marotta was now at his side 
when he made "Love in a Goldfish 
Bowl" for Paramount, and it was Ma- 
rotta who accompanied Fabe to Holly- 
wood for the filming of "A Summer 
World," a movie that somehow never 
got off the ground. 

Beginning of a rebellion 

Fabian blew his stack when the film 
was abandoned. Twentieth Century-Fox 
claimed they were having casting prob- 
lems — possibly true, since Bradford 
Dillman took a suspension rather than 
play, as he put it, "second fiddle to 
Fabian." But Fabe took the press by 
surprise when he reared up and 
heatedly said, "I can't see why I was 
brought out here to sit around for five 
weeks and do nothing." Reporters, used 
to having Fabian turn to Marcucci to 
answer any questions, now listened 
open-mouthed as he went on, "and I'm 
not impressed with the argument that I 
haven't been wasting my time because 
I've been studying drama and practic- 
ing horseback riding. That won't do me 
any good with the fans. They can make 
you or break you and I'm not about to 
stay idle while other singers go before 
the public to make sure they're not 
forgotten . . ." 

This was Fabian's first dissent, his 
first criticism of the way his affairs 
were being handled. Marcucci and 
company took serious note of it. Could 
it be that the very closeness, the very 
intimacy, of Bob's big-brotherly man- 
agement was now proving burdensome 
to the young star? Was the fledgling 
growing eager to try his own wings? 
"How do you go about meeting girls 
in this town . . . girls that are just girls 
and don't spend the evening talking 
shop?" Fabe complained to one re- 
porter. Was Marcucci's policy begin- 
ning to seem like "all work and no 
play" to a young man filled with vi- 
tality and the desire for adventure? 

Perhaps the answer to all these ques- 
tions is in the fact that Fabian was now 
18 and, at 18, a young man is not the 
t same as at 15. Perhaps Fabe, the eldest 
J of three Forte sons, and always adviser 
to his younger brothers, felt himself 
"too grown up" for what has often been 
78 



jokingly referred to as Bob's "mother- 
hen" attitude toward him. Or can it be 
that Fabian, dissatisfied with the box- 
office returns on "Hound Dog Man" 
and "North to Alaska," and only slight- 
ly mollified by the improvement in 
"High Time" and "Love in a Goldfish 
Bowl," had come to the conclusion that 
he ought to be allowed a larger vote 
in the decisions affecting his career? 
A close associate told TV Radio Mir- 
ror, "Fabe's gone on record . . . from 
now on, what he doesn't want to do. 
he just won't." 

Fabian "wanted" to do the role of 
the teen killer in the segment of Bus 
Stop that recently churned up a storm 
such as television hasn't seen in many 
a moon. He was cast as a hymn-singing 
psychopath who made passes at a mar- 
ried woman and went on to brutally rob 
and kill an elderly shopkeeper. Critics 
yelped that the public image of Fabe 
as a clean-cut all-American boy had 
been ruined, and though many viewers 
praised the performance, there was an 
alarming number of letters protesting 
in horror and dismay. Some fifteen 
ABC-affiliated stations bluntly refused 
to run the segment. Among the areas 
most incensed was Fabe's hometown of 
Philadelphia. The response of the pub- 
lic could scarcely be called a block- 
buster success. On the other hand, pro- 
ducer Robert Blees trumpeted the claim 
that Fabian deserved an Emmy for his 
performance. 

The Forte family, unable to view the 
show in their Berlin, New Jersey home 
— which gets its television via Phila- 
delphia channels — traveled to New 
York to catch it. In a solid phalanx, 
they supported his courage in taking 
the part and his artistry in doing it. 
Fabian found himself getting serious 
attention for the first time from Holly- 
wood personalities of stature. Ida Lu- 
pino and Howard Duff sent him a wire, 
with Ida adding that she hoped for the 
pleasure of directing him some time. 
Dean Martin's comment was, "Just 
don't crowd the field — there's enough 
Italian actors around," while Milton 
Berle wired, "Here I was up for an 
Emmy"— for "Doyle Against the 
House" on the Dick Powell Theater — 
"and you had to come along." 

"For the first time," Fabe confided 
later, "I feel like an actor. I want to 
keep studying, to learn more. I don't 
want to develop into a heavy, but I do 
want variety in roles. That's the only 
way I can prove myself as an actor." 

Apparently, Fabian has done just 
that — because, after viewing the Bus 
Stop segment when it was completed, 
some six months before it was aired. 
Darryl Zanuck cast him in a dramatic 
role in "The Longest Day," his epic 
movie on the Normandy invasion. 

When the smoke of the Bus Stop 
battle cleared, two things emerged 
clearly. Fabian's appearance had given 
the show its highest rating of the sea- 
son — and Bob Marcucci's opinion was 
a matter of mystery. 

Rumors of a split had been whis- 
pered even before the show. Now, Bob's 
silence seemed to confirm them. As 
Fabe turned more and more to acting, 
the split widened. After all. Marcucci 



makes his home in Philadelphia; most 
of his income is from Chancellor Rec- 
ords, located there. Most movie and TV 
acting jobs are on the West Coast. If 
Fabian carried out his plan, which 
would mean spending most of his time 
in Hollywood, this would pose a dis- 
agreeable problem of commuting for 
Bob. Most of all, he must feel some 
chagrin that the youngster he discov- 
ered and trained as a singer now wants 
to make the music business only a 
second-string to his bow. To Marcucci 
there is nothing as exciting or im- 
portant as the making of records. And 
while he has always encouraged both 
Fabe and Frankie Avalon to take on 
"occasional" acting roles, it was mainly 
to build them up as record stars. 

Apparently, Frankie Avalon, after 
five years with Bob, is still happy. He 
recently signed a new contract with 
Marcucci — and since he is now over 21. 
he made the decision, not his parents. 
But Frankie, from the beginning, was 
never as completely under Bob's wing 
as was his friend Fabian. He was older 
and had already wet his feet in show 
business when Marcucci signed him. 
He didn't need the attention and train- 
ing of the completely-inexperienced 
Fabian. Frankie was in Hollywood 
when Fabian arrived to begin 20th- 
Fox's "Mr. Hobbs Takes a Vacation," 
but he is keeping as quiet as Bob about 
the break-up. After all, both are his 
friends and he wouldn't want to take 
sides. Frankie and Fabe had lunch to- 
gether at the studio — but Fabian did 
not visit the rented house Frankie and 
Bob Marcucci were sharing. 

The end— and another beginning? 

Whatever the cause of the estrange- 
ment — whether the "creation" rebelled 
against his creator, or the creator grew 
disenchanted with his "creation," the 
long hand-in-hand climb to fame and 
fortune is over. Up or down, in the fu- 
ture each will do it on his own. 

The announcement of the split-up 
came from the Marcucci-Fabian press 
agent, via a two-sentence statement to 
the Hollywood trade papers stating: 
"Actor-singer Fabian and his manager 
Robert Marcucci have amicably ter- 
minated their association . . ." There 
have been further reports in the press 
that the parting was an entirely friendly 
one — but none of the quotes has come 
directly from the two people involved. 

Both Fabian and Bob have kept their 
silence; — as if it's still too soon to talk 
about how much each is hurt by this 
lost friendship. Bob has indicated he 
will devote more time than ever to 
Chancellor Records — and developing 
new talent. Fabian says that Tom 
Marotta will remain with him as his 
road manager. 

That's all they'll say, as they turn 
from each other and begin to follow 
separate paths. To friends of both, it 
seems like two brothers, ripped apart 
by some family difference, searching 
for something to take the place of their 
old warm good-fellowship. Perhaps only 
this search for something else will bring 
their paths together again. 

— Eunice Field 



Lose Pounds Before You Lose Him! 



(Continued from page 29) 
Ann's table and told a yarn about the 
day's funniest live-show snafu. Then he 
moved on to another table and set that 
group to laughing. He was blondish and 
rangy, with the map of Ireland stamped 
on his cheerful face. 

Jo Ann watched him. "He's fun." she 
said. "What's his name?" 

"Dean Hall," she was told. "A great 
guy and a terrific man behind the 
lens." 

Jo Ann liked his blue eyes, the set of 
his well-thatched head, the jaunty way 
he walked. She didn't know how or 
when, but somehow she thought, /'// be 
seeing him again. 

The following Sunday afternoon, she 
left the studio earlier than usual and 
walked slowly toward the parking lot, 
indulging in a mood. The late sunlight 
slanted over the baked buildings, and 
softened asphalt moved like velvet un- 
derfoot. Her parents and her sister had 
driven to San Diego for the weekend, 
so they weren't expected home until 
late that evening. Jo Ann was without 
plans, at loose ends in a world that 
seemed vast and hot and lonely. 

"So . . . where are you going?" asked 
Dean Hall, falling into step beside her. 
She told him, "Home, I guess," and 
started a conversation about that week's 
Welk show. It was good to talk shop 
with someone who understood show 
business, yet who was not a performer 
and thus could project a fresh view- 
point. 

After a few moments, Dean said, 
"Let's get out of this blazing sun. How 
about having a Coke with me ... or 
maybe dinner, since your family's out 
of town." So they had dinner at Samoa 
House, one of the most delightful of 
South Seas restaurants, and afterward 
they saw "The Apartment." Later, in 
the moonlight, they sat in the car in 
front of Jo Ann's home and discussed 
life . . . and music . . . and the mysteries 
of "timing" in a career. . . . 

During the following week, they had 
two dates. During the second week. 
three. Naturally, they saw each other 
daily at the broadcasting station. When 
Jo Ann was free for twenty or thirty 
minutes, she would visit Dean's set. Be- 
cause it is always easiest to instruct the 
mind where the heart's involved, Jo Ann 
began to learn something of the tech- 
nique employed on the side of the 
camera opposite where she usually 
stood. She was fascinated. 

In the evenings, she and Dean some- 
limes talked about his work, sometimes 
about hers, as they lingered over din- 
ner. Occasionally, they saw a movie. 
More often, they sat on the living-room 
floor and listened to recordings played 
on Jo Ann's hi-fi. 

That October was the loveliest Jo Ann 
had ever known. She awakened in the 
morning, smiling as if her dreams had 
been filled with a golden secret. In the 
noonday sun, she stood tall and weight- 
less, buoyant as a feather. At night, the 
world was a welter of late-blooming 
jasmine, the very perfume of love. 

Jo Ann made no attempt to analyze 



her bliss. And she made no attempt to 
hide it; secrecy would have been in- 
effective, in any case. The Arabs have 
a proverb: Three things there are that 
cannot be hidden — love, smoke, and a 
man riding on a camel. 

Her parents decided, in November. 
that Jo Ann was seeing too much of 
Dean Hall. She should, they advised 
her, have dates with other men. She was 
too young to be serious, and her career 
was flourishing too well to be jeop- 
ardized. She should be using her time 
for piano and accordion practice, for 
vocal lessons and dancing instruction. 
There was too much to be done, for her 
to be mooning over a man. They voiced 
no criticism of Dean Hall. He, as an 
individual, was not the point of ob- 
jection. Interference with Jo Ann's 
career was. 

Jo Ann tried to be a dutiful daugh- 
ter. She and her mother had always 
been devoted, so it was natural for Jo 
Ann to take her mother's counsel seri- 
ously. She tried to concentrate on her 
piano. But, after a few moments, she 
would stroll to the refrigerator to find 
a soft drink ... or a bit of leftover 
roast ... or a dish of pudding. 

She would awaken in the night, tor- 
mented by a misery that was easily 
translated into hunger, and briefly 
stilled by a three-decker sandwich. Be- 
tween meals, she ate candy bars, potato 
chips, and an occasional pizza. When 
co-workers noticed her expanding curves 
and kidded her about them, Jo Ann 
said, "I'm the jolly, fat type. I live to 
eat. I've never met a food I didn't like, 
or one that didn't like me." 

But Jo Ann's jollity, like that of many 
heavy people, was a pose. She was real- 
ly wretched. She hated the new clothing 
she had to buy, and she was ashamed oi 
her appetite. She longed for the golden 
hours of October — spent with Dean. She 
saw him nearly every day at the studio, 
but both were busy during working 
hours; there was little time for talk, no 
opportunity to be alone at leisure. 

Several times, she managed to have 
secret dates with Dean. But their very 
secrecy, the sense of hiding, and the 
need to lie about the evening when she 
returned home, robbed the dates of joy 
during their occurring and of thrill in 
their remembering. 

She talked it over with her best friend, 
Joyce Wolters, who said, "Don't you 
know what's giving you a bad time? 
You're in love. So is Dean. No one 
could see you two together without 
realizing it." 

Jo Ann explained that her family 
thought she was too young to know her 
own mind, that she shouldn't marry for 
at least two more years. Joyce laughed, 
noting that some families would insist 
that a woman of thirty-five was too 
young to marry. "Some families are 
possessive," she pointed out. "After all, 
you're not a giddy, light-headed flirt; 
you're steady, sensible, and twenty-one. 
I think you should make up your own 
mind . . . and no, you can't order an- 
other sandwich." 

That evening, in a restaurant hung 




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79 



A MODEL DIET FOR 
A MODEL FIGURE LIKE JO ANN'S 



For a slim, trim figure like Jo Ann Castle's, try this model-tested beauty diet from 
Eileen Ford, head of the famous Ford Model Agency in New York. For years, 
Eileen Ford has been chief beauty adviser to some of the world's most lovely 
women. She has helped hundreds of women to be more beautiful than they ever 
dreamed they could be. Proof of the success of this diet can be seen on magazine 
covers across-country. Be sure to check with your doctor first. Then, try it . . . and 
stick to it . . . you'll be on your way to a glamorous figure in no time flat ! 



Eileen Ford's "Model" Diet 



CALORIE COUNT: 900-1200 A DAY 



Breakfast 

Choice of: Grapefruit juice y 2 cup, unsweetened, 50 calories 

Half grapefruit x / 2 small, 50 

» Half cantaloupe V2 medium, 25 

Medium piece of watermelon 100 

One or two boiled or poached eggs 75 or 150 

Black coffee with sugar substitute 

(Liquid sugar substitutes can be used on grapefruit) 

Minimum calories: 100; maximum: 250 



Lunch 



80 



Choice of broiled hamburger or two hard boiled eggs 150 calories 

Raw tomato and raw carrot 25 each 

Glass of fortified skim milk 1 cup, 85 

(Fresh ground pepper for seasoning to cut down on water-retentive salt) 

Calories: 285 



Dinner 

Choice of tomato or other vegetable juice, 

grapefruit juice or tomato soup juices, 25; soup, 50 calories 

Choice of broiled steak, liver, iamb chop, 

chicken, fish or hamburger, 

roast leg of lamb, beef or chicken medium serving, about 400 

Vegetables: 

Choice of spinach, stringbeans, tomatoes, 

carrots or cabbage (without butter) medium serving, about 25 

Salad: 

Lettuce with lemon and fresh ground pepper 

or wine vinegar and light oil 30 to 50 calories 

Dessert: 

Choice of half grapefruit, medium piece of watermelon 

or half cantaloupe 25 to 100 calories 

Black coffee 

Minimum: 505; maximum: 625 



HOW TO STAY ON A DIET 

1. Eat the best cuts of meat and the freshest fruits and vegetables; they're more nutritious 
and much more appetizing. 2. Never let yourself get hungry. Keep snacks handy: Carrots, 
celery, watercress, cucumbers. Hunger pangs are unnecessary and dangerous for your will 
power. 3. Eat small amounts of food at a time to "shrink your stomach." Five small meals 
a day are better than one enormous one. 4. Use a pepper mill or lemon juice to give your 
food accent. Salt helps your body retain water and therefore weight. 5. Avoid crash diets. 
They are dangerous and lead to gorging. 6. Stand in front of your mirror, stripped down 
every day. Take a deep breath and stand straight and tell yourself that you are thinner, 
even if it's an eighth of a pound. Believe it and it will come true. 7. Once you have lost 
the weight, don't go back to your old eating habits. You need less food to keep your lighter 
body going, so eat less than you used to or you'll gain the weight right back. 



with holly and tinsel, while Christmas 
carols supplied background music, Jo 
Ann had dinner with Dean. Searching 
his eyes, she asked, "Do you want to 
marry me?" 

"More than anything I've ever wanted 
in my life," he answered solemnly. 

And so they were married on Sunday, 
January 8, 1961. Jo Ann appeared with 
the Lawrence Welk band at the Aragon 
Ballroom until two that morning, then 
she changed into traveling clothes, and 
she and Dean set out for Las Vegas. 

In Dean's excitement, he had forgot- 
ten to fill the car with gas. They were 
halfway across the desert before he 
noticed that they were running on the 
fumes of jet aircraft passing overhead. 
They passed a dozen filling stations — 
all closed. 

"Fine way to start married life," Dean 
gloomed. "Walking five miles, or maybe 
fifteen, for a can of gasoline . . . I'm 
sorry, honey." 

"There's a station — right there, at the 
bottom of the hill. Someone's around 
there, because there's smoke coming 
from the living quarters in back." Jo 
Ann crossed her fingers. 

The car, its fuel gauge knocking the 
"E," rolled downhill and into the sta- 
tion, coughing its last as it stopped be- 
side a pump. While the tank was being 
filled, Jo Ann dropped a quarter into 
one of Nevada's ubiquitous slot ma- 
chines (nearly every filling station has 
at least one) and hit the jackpot. 

"See — we're shot with luck!" she 
jubilated. "Two good breaks in ten 
minutes . . . how can we lose?" 

The ceremony was performed at three 
o'clock that afternoon, with Joyce 
Wolters and Stanley Skoff serving as 
attendants. Jo Ann wore a short jade- 
green satin afternoon dress, princess 
style, with a square neckline and three- 
quarter sleeves. Her hat was white, 
and so was her orchid corsage. 

Afterward, she telephoned her mother 
with the news. It proved to be a stormy 
conversation, which sent Jo Ann to her 
wedding dinner — famished. "I'm going 
to go on a diet tomorrow," she an- 
nounced, tying into a fourteen-ounce 
steak and a baked potato. She had said 
it before ... in her honest heart, she 
admitted that she might say it again, 
many times . . . without results. 

She reckoned without her brave new 
husband. Two weeks later, she was in 
the office of Dr. Chadney, who checked 
her pulse, respiration, and blood pres- 
sure, and ordered certain additional 
laboratory tests to be made. Next, he 
gave her a prescription for medication 
to be taken three times daily, thirty 
minutes before meals. 

He warned her, "Tonight, you won't 
be able to eat dinner. You won't be 
hungry; but you'll have a sense of com- 
fortable well-being, as if you'd just en- 
joyed a banquet." 

He was right. 

He also gave Jo Ann a calorie chart 
to memorize as fully as possible, and 
he laid down three irrevocable rules: 
No refrigerator-raiding at any time. 
No alcoholic beverages, ever. Conscien- 
tious taking of the vitamins he pre- 
scribed. 

It was unnecessary for the doctor to 



prescribe a course of exercise because 
she was already so active, dancing, play- 
ing honky-tonk piano and working on 
a big TV show (not to mention her work 
as a happy homemaker, which Jo Ann — 
with typical energy — has turned into a 
regimen for trimming off unwanted 
inches ! ) . 

During the first three months of Jo 
Ann's medication, she reported to the 
doctor each week: after that, she re- 
ported every two weeks. Ten months 
after starting her diet, her weight was 
down to 125 pounds (from 152), and 
she was working to shed five more. 

At this writing, she still requires 
some medication and her caloric intake 
must be kept under 1200 per day. But 



she now wears a size-12 dress, a size-11 
belt — and, for the first time in her life, 
she can wear capris. In fact, she has 
gone all out for vivid playtime outfits. 

"Good girl," said Dean, when Jo Ann 
followed his advice so promptly — swal- 
lowing her pride, instead of gulping 
down a soda to soothe the hurt his can- 
did words had caused. 

"Glamour girl," he can say now. She's 
obviously not going to lose his love. 

And, in a way, that's his fault, too! 
— Fredda Dudley Balling 

Jo Ann Castle is seen and heard on The 
Lawrence Welk Show — ABC-TV, Sat., 
9 to 10 P.M. EST. Other Welk programs 
are heard over ABC Radio; see papers. 



A Cure For What Ails Every Woman 



(Continued from page 20) 
there have naturally been changes in 
his life. For one thing, he now finds it 
almost impossible to be alone and un- 
recognized in a crowd, a side-effect of 
his success. But perhaps the biggest 
change is his own attitude toward this. 
He no longer has to be alone, no longer 
has to prove that he can go it alone. 
And Vince has been trying to prove this 
from the day he was born. 

He was born on July 9, 1931, in the 
tough Brownsville section of Brooklyn. 
But not even his birthday was his alone. 
He shared it with his twin brother, 
Anthony. Although Vince and Anthony 
were not identical twins, his parents — 
Julia and Vincent Zoino — naturally 
tended to think of them together, as if 
neither had a separate identity. And 
this bothered Vince. It bothered him so 
much that it has colored his whole way 
of life. He set out to show he was "dif- 
ferent," and it didn't seem to matter to 
him how he achieved this. 

In his own words, Vince sums it up 
this way: "I was always the oddball. 
My dad got his gray hairs from me. He 
used to ask, 'What's with this kid, any- 
way? Something funny about him — 
never mixes with the others in the 
family.' Ours, like most Italian families, 
was a close-knit one. I tried, but I 
couldn't help being an oddball. My 
twin brother Tony doesn't look any- 
thing like me. He's red-haired, like my 
mother — resembles Danny Kaye. I had 
little to do with him as a kid, and 
haven't seen him now for ten years. 
Tony's in business. I guess I was just 
a young Ben Casey. I severed the um- 
bilical cord for good at sixteen when 
I left home for Ohio State." 

What Vince does not say is that, 
forced to share everything in a family 
of nine — including his own birthday — 
finding he could not conform to the 
rigid togetherness his folks expected, 
he decided to share nothing of himself, 
until he had proved he could stand 
alone, until he was accepted for him- 
self. But first he had to find out what he 
really was. 

He did this, according to John Cas- 
savetes — distinguished actor-director 
and friend of Vince's since they were 
student actors — by dipping into differ- 



ent kinds of social life, by passing 
through various phases during his 
twelve years in Hollywood. 

"Vincent raced motorcycles at one 
time," Cassavetes recalls, "but he was 
never a kook. A very green kid when 
he came out, Vincent went through vari- 
ous cycles — the Elia Kazan cycle, the 
Sinatra set, night-club comics, a few 
fringe Hollywood sets. He did this 
merely because he wanted to learn as 
much as he could from many different 
groups, not because he longed to be a 
hanger-on. Today, he counts among his 
good friends Sammy Davis Jr., fighter- 
comic Maxie Rosenbloom, Jerry Lewis 
and Rocky Marciano. I've known Vin- 
cent a long time, and yet I really don't 
know much about his life. Vincent is 
the reticent type. In a way, he's some- 
what of a mystery man who keeps his 
phone number and address to himself." 

This last statement is further borne 
out by Abby Greshler, Vince's agent 
for the last six months. Abby had 
known Vince for years, and yet he 
never knew where to find Vince. That 
wasn't a problem until Jim Mosher 
(who made the outstanding Medic a few 
years back) was looking for someone 
to play Dr. Ben Casey. 

"Mosher had already tested sixty 
leading men without finding what he 
wanted," says Greshler. "I read the 
script, saw that Casey couldn't be a 
pretty boy, but must be real masculine 
and a real actor. Suddenly, I got a flash 
and knew that Vincent Edwards was 
exactly the ticket. Luckily, the Ben 
Casey producers had the film on Henry 
Fonda's Deputy series in which Vince 
did a superb job as a frontier doctor. 
That did it! They wanted to see him 
quick, like yesterday. No wonder Vince 
says: 'Fate had a lot to do with me 
getting Casey.' 

"But for me remained the problem of 
finding Vince, whom I hadn't yet 
signed. He was then in his motorcycle- 
racing period, you know, the Brando 
bit — a kind of near-beatnik character 
with the boots, leather jacket, unruly 
hair — the whole thing. And unlike any 
other client, Vince hadn't given me his 
phone number. When I'd asked him, he 
said, 'Don't call me; I'll call you.' I 
can't figure this guy out. He was in his 



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81 



hiding-from-people period, and I had 
to find him, but quick! So I even hired 
a private detective who, believe it or 
not, found him under a car out at the 
Ascot Car Races in the Crater Bowl, 
near Malibu Beach. There was Vince 
ready to race his motorbike, but stop- 
ping to work on a pal's Maserati!" 

And so Vince Edwards became Dr. 
Ben Casey, but even that he didn't talk 
about. "I had to draw out of him that 
he was signed for the Ben Casey series," 
Cassavetes remembers. "We'd talked a 
Jong time when I asked him, 'Vince, 
what are you up to now?' 'Oh, I'm start- 
ing a TV series,' he said, as a throw- 
away line. And, later, when critics gave 
him bravos for his portrayal of the 
doctor, I called to congratulate him. 
Vincent was grateful, but he quickly 
changed the subject. He's a loner," 
Cassavetes concludes. "The last of the 
real individualists, a man who stands 
alone." 

This has held true in the romance 
department so far, too. In a town where 
it is almost a cult to marry early and 
often, Vince has adroitly managed to 
retain his single status. As Vince puts 
it, "Twice I got to the track, but was 
gate-shy. I had two starts, but didn't 
finish." Translated, this means Vince 
was engaged twice and dis-engaged 
both times. "They're both happily mar- 
ried now. One was Jackie Loughery, 
now Mrs. Jack Webb, the other a dan- 
cer, Betty Uittey." 

But now that he is on the road to 
finding himself, Vince maintains he is 
looking forward to marriage, though his 
tremendously full schedule makes even 
dating difficult. 



"There's never been a better inven- 
tion than women," says Vince, his 
hazel-green eyes mirthful. "I've thought 
so since I was around ten. Before that, 
I must confess that, for a long time, I 
thought girls were just 'soft boys.' Then 
I met a pair of twins, Tu-Tu and Anna, 
who were really the 'girls next door,' 
and I got a big crush on both of them. 

"But marriage — well, marriage means 
to me supporting a wife and children. 
I haven't married before this because of 
my precarious financial state." 

And he hasn't married before this 
because he wasn't ready yet to share his 
identity — not really. It has taken him 
all this time, all these years to prove he 
wasn't just a half of a combination — a 
twin — but a person in his own right. 

He began proving this back when he 
attended East New York High, where 
he was captain of the swimming team 
(later New York State champion), then 
transferred to Thomas Jefferson, where 
he was a track star good enough to be 
offered an athletic scholarship to Ohio 
State University. Without this scholar- 
ship, he would not have been able to 
go to college. 

"We weren't exactly poverty-strick- 
en," says Vince, "but there was never 
enough money for a big family, and I 
had to make my way on my own. I had 
no teen life because I had to work all 
the time — as a life guard at Coney Is- 
land, even swinging a pick on the sub- 
way for a while — anything I could get, 
though I begrudged every minute away 
from the pool and gym. Days, I went 
to vocational school. Nights, I studied 
academic subjects to prepare for col- 
lege. We had no hot-rods in my neigh- 



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82 



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3-62 



borhood. Kids like me didn't have cars 
for joy-riding. We thought that was for 
sissies. And, of course, in high school 
I had no interest in acting. That would 
have been for sissies, too. That came 
later at Ohio State. 

"When I finally did decide to become 
an actor, my father didn't really ob- 
ject. He said : 'Okay, so you're an actor. 
But when do you go to work?' ' 

The hungry Mr. Edwards went to 
work first as a chorus boy in "High 
Button Shoes" on Broadway at $85 a 
week. When he had no work, or as 
Vince puts it, "Until two years ago, 
when things began to break for me, my 
b6st friend was always that unsung 
hero of actors — the state unemployment 
director. Every Wednesday, I'd stop 
searching for an acting job long enough 
to collect the 'Big 55' — my unemploy- 
ment money. Like a lot of guys, I 
learned how to spread it as thin as 
the ham in a drugstore sandwich." 

After "High Button Shoes," and in 
between bouts with the unemployment 
director, Vince began landing good 
roles in major TV plays, on both coasts, 
and in major motion pictures such as 
"Serenade," with Mario Lanza, and 
"The Three Faces of Eve," with Joanne 
Woodward. He was also in a number 
of low-budget crime pictures, among 
them "City of Fear" and "Murder By 
Contract." These films, according to 
Arthur Knight, in Saturday Review. 
were great — ". . . the sleepers of the 
year. 

When Vince read that, he says, "I 
felt ten feet tall." 

But Greshler, Vince's agent, thought 
they were nothing. "He played his 
share of cop killers and other bad guys, 
because he looked as if he could take 
care of himself," Greshler muses. "It 
got so that I knew if he ever got a call 
for a role in a Biblical epic, he'd be 
wanted for Judas. Vince was practically 
signed for the lead in 87th Precinct, 
but luckily for him, that didn't work 
out. And he got Casey." 

Yes, Vince got Casey, and through 
that show, he has discovered that no 
one has to stand alone. Even the dedi- 
cated Dr. Ben Casey has to rely on his 
colleagues for help. Everyone from the 
lab technician who tests for blood 
types to the anaesthetist who elim- 
inates a patient's pain, is a necessary 
part in a doctor's life. Seeing this on 
the set, Vince has begun applying it in 
his own life. 

He has been dating a pretty blonde 
receptionist who, surprisingly enough, 
works for two doctors who are her 
brothers-in-law. Sherry Nelson, the 
widow of a jockey, is twenty-two, a 
sweet, quiet-spoken girl who is a fine 
musician. She plays the violin in the 
Burbank Symphony and met Vince two 
years ago at a sports event. Will this 
friendship progress to marriage? No 
one, not even Vince and Sherry, knows 
yet. But it is safe to say that now, 
more than at any other time in his life, 
Vince is ready to give up being a 
loner. He is, at last, ready to share 
himself. — Erika Maxson 

Vincent Edwards is Ben Casey on 
ABC-TV, Mon., 10 to 11 P.M. EST. 



This Is the Way the Bert Bounces 



(Continued from page 44) 
isn't the raucous kind. Just an appre- 
ciative, "yeh-that's-funny" kind of 
chuckle. 

At home, Parks gets his exercise 
cutting the grass in summer, doing odd 
jobs around the house all year 'round 
— although, long since, he could afford 
plenty of help outside and in. He is no 
great sports enthusiast. Tennis and golf 
he can take, or leave, though he does 
like them. His evenings are more often 
quiet than not. "I don't need something 
going on around me every minute to be 
happy," he says. 

Now in his thirtieth year in broad- 
casting — both radio and TV, of course 
— the list of Bert's shows is staggering. 
Beginning as an announcer over the 
hometown radio station in Atlanta, 
Georgia, at seventeen; going on to 
bigger and better jobs in New York, 
two years later. He was straight man 
and singer with The Eddie Cantor 
Show on radio, a few years later still — 
the Big Chance. He didn't flunk it. It 
has been go, go, go! ever since. 

His newest TV show, Yours For A 
Song, came in the middle of a four- 
week run of "The Music Man," at New 
Jersey's Paper Mill Playhouse. He 
starred on Broadway in the show, 
played 300 performances. "Probably the 
most difficult part ever created for one 
man," he says. "And I would like to 
do another. When people come in and 
pay their money to see you, that's the 
test. That's gratifying." 

Yours For A Song went on the ABC- 
TV network two months ahead of the 
scheduled date, first as a half-hour 
nighttime show on Tuesday, starting 
last November, then quickly expanding 
to include a daily half-hour in Decem- 
ber. The format is fairly simple. A pair 
of contestants match their knowledge 
of popular songs, old and new. 

The orchestra plays, Bert helps a con- 
testant sing the lyrics flashed on a 
screen — but certain words are omitted 
for the contestant to fill in, for a cash 
award. At the conclusion of each round, 
the one who wins the most money meets 
a new challenger. And so it goes. Bert 
plays it for laughs and fun, keeping 
contestants contented — and in line. 

"I watched the daytime shows and 
what I missed was music, especially 
singing," Parks says. "Lots of games, 
but little music. I like to hear singing 
— and I like to sing. This was for me. 
But I wasn't expecting to get started all 
of a sudden." 

The beginnings were frantic. There 
he was, still playing the brassy Harold 
Hill in "The Music Man" across the 
Hudson in New Jersey. There were the 
first tapes of the nighttime TV show to 
be made, immediately followed by five- 
a-week for the pending daytime show. 
For the first time, the "indestructible" 
Bert Parks almost lost the title. He got 
a checkup, took a short vacation, came 
back like a space capsule rocketing to 
the recovery rendezvous in the Pacific. 

How does he really do it all, all the 
time? Why does he continue to work so 
hard, after a list of shows as long as 



your arm? Going back from his latest 
before this 'one on TV, Masquerade 
Party, the roster includes Break The 
Bank (eleven years, all told, on that!), 
County Fair, Bert Parks' Bandstand, 
The Big Payoff, Double Or Nothing, 
Balance Your Budget, Bid W Buy, 
Giant Step, Two In Love, The Bert 
Parks Show. 

And the most famous of them all. 
Stop The Music — the one that edged 
the fabulous Fred Allen off the air by 
sheer magnitude of its giveaways and 
the dynamics of Quizmaster Parks. The 
jackpot went up as high as $30,000 for 
one night's loot — unheard of in those 
days, and no mean amount even in 
these. He was involved in the Miss 
America pageants (and still is), in 
commercials, benefits, and all the usual 
extras asked of all performers. 

Conceivably he could work less, pro- 
vide less for the Income Tax Bureau's 
cut, if he wanted to. His answer to 
this? "I get restless if I don't have 
enough to do. I have to keep busy. I 
like to spend a lot of energy on some- 
thing I like." 

How does he keep the supply of 
energy flowing? 

"How does any busy person keep 
going? You pace yourself, get rid of a 
sense of urgency, don't let others dis- 
turb you. People around me try to 
hurry me. 'You must do this today.' 
But why does everything have to be 
done today? Why can't some things be 
left until tomorrow? 

"Maybe they'll go better and easier 
and quicker tomorrow," Bert shrugs 
lightly. "You have to control your own 
time and only do as much as you can 
without strain. A good day's work 
should leave you feeling stimulated — 
not battered and beat." 

Bert has a theory that fatigue is far 
more mental than physical. Made up 
of little worries and frustrations, things 
you don't get solved or finished. "You 
don't get tired from the hard job you 
do well — or, for that matter, from any 
work you really enjoy." 

He detests post-mortems. "I used to 
go back over every detail of a show. 
Worry how it could have been done 
better, reproach myself for every flaw. 
I tore myself apart. You can, in this 
business. Now I never rehash. I can 
thank my wife, Annette, for helping 
in this. 

"When I talk to Annette about any- 
thing — business, home or family situa- 
tions — we get done with it. She never 
starts harking back to it, as some wives 
do. When I have finished a perform- 
ance at the studio, I leave. If something 
should be discussed, that's okay. But no 
going over and over what's finished and 
done! Tensions build up, when you 
keep revolving a thing in your mind." 

The people who tell him he ought to 
be tired make him tired. If Bert has 
heard it once, he has heard it a thou- 
sand times: "Don't you just collapse 
from fatigue at the end of the day?" 

His answer: "I don't, unless you 
remind me how tired I should be." 
(Please turn the page) 




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83 



Annette protects him from too many 
social pressures. She has always kept 
the kids out of his way when he came 
home beat, but now they're quite grown 
up. The twins, Joel and Jeffrey, will 
be sixteen next summer. Annette Jr. will 
be thirteen in March. They have a lively 
social life, but their parents are more 
restrained. 

"Too little time," Bert says. "We 
have friends — but not business contacts. 
None of that what-can-he-do-for-me 
company. We barely have enough time 
for the people who really mean some- 
thing to us. When we can get together 
with them, that's our fun." 

Parks works well under pressure, even 
though he avoids it at home. He's a 
quick study, needs little rehearsal — 
Yours For A Song isn't that type of 
show, anyhow, except for camera-and- 
lights rehearsals. He's good at ad-lib, 
isn't ashamed of being a little corny at 



times and more than a little folksy. 
"People identify with us as friends. 
Isn't that what a show like this is 
about?" 

A static show bores him, makes him 
more restless. His repartee is rapid, his 
manner informal. His stock in trade is 
in being extemporaneous, fast, and as 
funny as he can be on quick notice. 
He gets interested in the guests— ap- 
parently, even the dullest ones. Perhaps 
that's because they present the greatest 
challenge. 

It all looks easier from the outside 
than from the inside, trying to break 
through on good days and bad, with 
good guests and awful ones. With Bert's 
long background of experience, he 
could chuck it all and go into produc- 
tion or the executive end of the busi- 
ness. Or he could work less, take more 
vacations, take it easier. 

The idea doesn't interest him. 



"This is what I like to do. And if you 
want to be a performer, you have to 
participate actively in it. It's a pro- 
fession that is changing all the time, 
and you have to build up new things 
with which you can be identified. With 
each new project, you work out a new 
routine for yourself. You begin to find 
the shortcuts, the ways to make it 
easier. You put on those extra spurts 
when it's necessary to get things done. 

"That's all there is to it. That . . . 
and no over-dramatizing of yourself, 
your job, or your importance." 

This is the way Bert Parks bounces. 
And he gets more bounce to the energy- 
ounce than almost anyone else in the 
business. — The End 

Bert Parks stars in Yours For A Song, 
as seen on ABC-TV, Tues., at 9:30 P.M. 
EST, and Mon.-through-Fri., at 11:30 
A.M. (in all areas). 



You Think You've Got Troubles! 



(Continued from page 49) 
and Madolin Wilson, who is our secre- 
tary-accountant and head of the Fan 
Club. And — except on Sunday, when 
we ad-lib meals — Clara Theophile pre- 
sides over our kitchen. (There's a good 
deal of free-enterprise eating when 
Clara isn't around to guard the re- 
frigerator! ) 

Also present, at some time during 
each day, are several of the more than 
fifty Lennon cousins who live in the 
Venice area. 

Our house itself — the building — is 
quite different from that regarded as 
typically Californian. Occupying a 
large corner lot on a quiet street, its 
exterior is white frame and its entrance 
walk is bordered by tree roses. The 
interior consists of a huge cement base- 
ment, above which there are three 
stories. 

The first floor is divided into a large 
living room with a hearty fireplace, 
an enormous dining room which is 
also used as part-time office by Kay 
and Madolin, a large kitchen with a 
many-windowed breakfast area, and a 
service porch in which the washer and 
drier seldom know an hour of unem- 
ployment. 

When Clara tells me in triumph, as 
she is leaving for the day, "I finished 
every bit of the laundry," we look at 
each other and shake our heads in 
amazement. It simply doesn't seem 
possible. 

On the combined second and third 
floors there are six bedrooms and one 
huge bathroom which has been 
subdivided into three areas: One con- 
tains the tub with overhead shower, 
one contains the commode, and the 
third — usually filled with a snowflurry 
of toothpaste, combs and towels — con- 
tains two companion sinks. 

Bill and I occupy one bedroom. 
Peggy and baby Chris are roommates, 
Annie and Mimi share a room, Kathy 
and Janet live together, and the boys' 
dormitory houses Joey, Bill Jr., Pat 
t and Danny. The sixth bedroom is oc- 
R cupied by my mother, who visits us 
often; when she is away, the children 
draw straws for the privilege of sleep- 



ing in Nana's bed. 

Behind the house, in a large fenced 
yard, several structures have been 
built for the accommodation of Life 
a la Lennon. Most used is a covered 
lanai (or terrace) equipped with a 
long picnic table and two benches, a 
Coke bar, and a juke-box. On Diane's 
wedding day, after the formal recep- 
tion was over, about 150 people came 
here to the house and settled in the 
lanai. 

We had a perfectly wonderful time 
dancing, singing, and enjoying our- 
selves generally. We were only sorry 
that Diane and Dick had gone away 
on their honeymoon, because they 
would have enjoyed it, too! (As a 
matter of fact, when DeeDee listened 
to our rhapsodic description of the 
party, she was downright exasperated 
over missing it. Can't wait until one 
of the other girls gets married.) 

South of the lanai is a grounded 
trailer in which the Lennon Sisters' 
professional files are kept, and beyond 
that is a little-girl-sized playhouse used 
mainly as a fortress by Annie and 
Mimi against the Skinned Knee Indian 
tribe represented by Joey, Bill Jr., Pat 
and Danny. 

Opposite the playhouse is the boys' 
club room, the decor of which has 
been achieved by mingling football 
helmets, shoulder pads, baseball pen- 
nants, South Sea matting, cartoons cut 
from magazines, and such. 

The "Doughboy" swimming pool is 
surrounded by a six-foot fence, 
breeched only by a padlocked gate 
whose key is hidden in a secret place 
known only to family members over 
fifteen years of age. Anyone who un- 
locks the gate automatically becomes 
responsible for the welfare of every- 
one who goes swimming. 

At the extreme back of the lot is 
the clubroom for the older girls : Peggy, 
Kathy, Janet, and Janet's best friend, 
Joanie Esser, who is an honorary mem- 
ber of the Lennon family. Storage 
cabinets line one long wall of this 
room. Half of the cabinets are taken 
up for wardrobe space in which the 
Lennon costumes for The Lawrence 



Welk Show can be hung (recently, 
we suffered a crisis when thirty new 
dresses had to be stored). 

The other half is divided into shelf 
sections to accommodate the Lennon 
collection of single and album record- 
ings, and the clubroom furnishings in- 
clude a huge sofa-bed, a television set, 
a record player, several slipper chairs, 
and a telephone. 

That's our plant layout. This is the 
way it operates. 

Morning starts at 6:45, when I 
arise, dress quickly and prepare break- 
fast (usually French toast, hot cereal 
and milk) for high-school Janet, who 
leaves the house by 7:15. 

By that time, Kathy and Peggy (al- 
ready through high school) are ready 
to help wash, dress, feed, and dis- 
patch to St. Mark's school (a block 
from our home) the second shift, con- 
sisting of Danny, Pat, Bill Jr., and 
Mimi. 

By the time the schoolers have left 
the house, the young fry — represented 
by Joey, Annie and Chris — are ready 
to locust a path through anything left 
over. 

Sunday mornings, after nine-o'clock 
church services, are gala. Menu con- 
sists of pancakes, heated cinnamon 
rolls, raisin toast . . . and sour-dough 
French bread for particular Annie, 
now three. Served with this variety of 
breadstuffs are several kinds of fresh 
and stewed fruits, eggs in each cus- 
tomer's favorite version, and milk, milk, 
milk. 

During his early days as a father, 
Bill was (as most people know) a milk- 
man. Naturally, it gives him a patriotic 
thrill to be the best customer of our 
present milkman. We buy sixteen 
quarts a day! 

Dinner, at night, is aimed at six — 
but the truth is that, if the entire 
family should ever happen to convene 
on the dot, some evening, I guess I'd 
faint. Each of the children has some 
outside activity, so a cafeteria system 
is the only arrangement that makes 
sense for us. 

The menu always encompasses a 
sturdy meat course, two vegetables, a 



green salad, and some sort of mass- 
produced and nutritive dessert. I try to 
steer my trenchermen toward fruit, 
but they gravitate toward puddings or 
the cookie jar. 

Marketing for a family that varies 
in size from twelve to thirty (depend- 
ing on the drop-in trade) would give 
an army mess sergeant a neurosis, I'm 
convinced, but I just do the best I can 
and keep a stock of instant-combustion 
frozen foods on hand. I buy fresh 
fruits and vegetables every day, shop 
for staples every other day. 

I don't even try to make grocery lists. 
I go to the market and simply load a 
basket. Usually, I have an idea of the 
shortages in our pantry. I think : There 
are only two packages of spaghetti 
left, so we'll need more. Better pick up 
half-a-dozen packages of macaroni. 
Better order a case of peaches. Mmm 
— a new kind of bread. Better try three 
or four loaves. Always, several different 
kinds of bread! As for the rest, I just 
buy some of everything in sight — 
ground round steak, potatoes, lettuce, 
romaine, celery, tomatoes, apples, 
other fruits in season. 

If still more is needed — since we 
never know how many will be present 
for any given meal — there's always 
someone who can pop into a car and 
fetch it from one of the four super- 
markets within five blocks of our home. 
Peggy and Kathy both drive. The maid 
has her car. Bill does miscellaneous 
errands, and so do Kay and Madolin. 
In a pinch, one of the "walking" mem- 
bers of the family can be dispatched 
for a pound of butter or five dozen 
eggs. 

Our bedtime routine starts at seven 
in the evening. We run our family 
through the shower like cars through 
a washrack. In summer, the system is 
simplified by sending the boys to the 
"convenience" shower in the basement, 
but it's too cold in winter. 

This may sound all too chaotic, but 
by the time I had had five youngsters, 
I realized that no day could ever be 
planned. Whenever I tried to run the 
house on a timetable, somebody came 
down with measles, mumps, chicken 
pox or a cold, and the plans had to be 
scrapped. If you let it upset you, you'd 
lose your mind. I just say to myself, 
Well, I'm not going to be able to do 
what I had hoped to accomplish today. 
Maybe tomorrow will be simpler. 

In one respect, order has been es- 
tablished on a permanent basis — thanks 
to no planning on our part. Each of 
our eleven children was born in a 
different month of the year, an arrange- 
ment that supplies one — but only one 
— birthday celebration each month. I 
shop all year for birthdays and for 
Christmas, wrapping and storing as I 
make purchases. Sometimes I forget 
what I've bought, but not often. I 
seem to have a built-in filing system 
with a mental pigeon-hole for the wants 
and needs of each child. 

Working in a dental appointment 
for each child every six months would 
baffle the author of a railroad time- 
table, but — with the marvelous help 
of Madolin Wilson — I have mastered 
the Order of the Molars. However, I've 



given up trying to keep track of which 
child needs what shot, when. I've 
turned over the problem to our family 
doctor, who makes regular house calls. 

Annie, our three-year-old, has caught 
onto this doctor bit. She likes to open 
the door for guests, but when she sees 
that the caller is her doctor (and her 
godfather), she demands, "Me day for 
shot?" 

If the doctor says, "Not today, 
Annie," the medical man is treated to 
a sugary smile and ushered into the 
house. If the doctor remains prudently 
silent or merely nods, Anne decamps. 
This seems to be a gag, because — when 
she is caught — she submits docilely 
to treatment. 

In any family there are moments of 
disagreement, but we think we have 
hit upon an ideal procedure. The eldest 
child present, when hostilities break 
out, is responsible for arbitrating in- 
stantly and fairly. If the problem can't 
be solved by the eldest witness, it is 
taken up with Daddy as soon as pos- 
sible. His ruling is final. 

Luckily, disputes are rare. As each 
new child has come along, he or she 
has been taken in as a gift from 
Heaven, and loved devotedly. Every- 
one belongs to everyone else. Diane 
often comes to our house in the morn- 
ing and says, "May I take Annie for 
the day?" Or Chris. Or Joey. One day 
last week, Peggy and Kathy took all 
three of the little ones and spent the 
day at Diane's home. They rearranged 
the furniture in Diane's bedroom, and 
came home so full of news that all six 
were talking at once. When Chris de- 
cided he was hungry, in the midst of 
the reports, he shouted lustily at Dee- 
Dee to get his bottle. Me, he ignored 
completely. 

The clothing budget for a big family 
is always a major headache. We've 
solved it, as nearly as possible, by 
making the hand-me-down process 
painless. When an older child gets a 
new dress, coat, sweater, or pair of 
levis, a point is made of praising the 
purchase and saying to all those po- 
tentially in line for the garment, 
"Aren't you glad that when Janet out- 
grows that, you'll get to wear it?" 

Annie has now grown into a yellow 
print dress which has belonged to both 
Janet and Mimi, and she holds the 
gown in esteem so great that she has 
to be talked out of wearing it on a 
twenty-four-hour basis. 

In final analysis, I think the first 
secret in managing a large family is 
to live each day for itself as fully as 
possible, thinking: How lucky we are, 
instead of How am I ever going to get 
around to dusting! 

The second secret — and the most 
important one — is to live for each 
other, and to live for God. In a God- 
living, God-loving household, the future 
takes care of itself. — The End 

The Lennon Sisters — Peggy, Kathy 
and Janet — sing on The Lawrence 
Welk Show, as seen over ABC-TV, 
Sat., 9 to 10 P.M. EST. Other Welk 
programs are heard over ABC Radio; 
see newspapers for time in your area. 
(Blouses worn by the Lennon Sisters 
on our cover are from Ship 'n Shore.) 



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85 



The Woman Who Broke Up Dinah Shore's Home 



86 



(Continued from page 43) 
and George had left Hollywood, re- 
portedly for New York, the papers 
were filled with additional statements. 

Dinah's attorney announced: "Miss 
Shore will file for divorce on very gen- 
eral grounds. No specific acts will be 
alleged. They have remained on very 
friendly terms." 

It was disclosed that Dinah expected 
to win custody of the children, but, as 
a friend of both Dinah and George as- 
serted, "George can have both of them 
any time he wants them, of course. This 
isn't an ordinary divorce." 

But the most typical comment was 
the one made by one of the guest per- 
formers who'd appeared on Dinah's last 
show before the divorce announcement 
was released. "This is the wildest sur- 
prise," he said. "There was just no 
indication at all." In the days that fol- 
lowed, his reaction was echoed by 
people throughout America. 

How did it all happen? 

In the wake of the official announce- 
ments and the general public surprise 
came a flood of rumor, gossip and 
speculation from Hollywood second- 
guessers. Their explanations of how 
and why Dinah and George's "perfect" 
marriage had gone up in smoke boiled 
down to four main charges: 

Dinah was spending too much time 
being the big television star and had 
neglected George; 

George couldn't stand the fact that 
his career was going nowhere while 
Dinah was more successful than ever; 

Dinah and George had been "incom- 
patible from almost the beginning of 
their marriage" but had stayed to- 
gether because of their mutual love for 
the children; 

George had been linked with other 
women — the names most frequently 
mentioned were Ziva Rodann, Diane 
McBain and Madlyn Rhue — and Dinah 
was fed up and couldn't take it any 
longer. 

The third charge — "incompatibility 
from almost the beginning" — was silly 
on the face of it, but that didn't stop 
the rumormongers from making and 
spreading it, just the same. 

First of all, the Montgomerys had 
been married five years before Missy 
was born, and eleven years before they 
adopted Jody in his infancy, so the 
children couldn't have kept them to- 
gether in those early years! 

Secondly, the know-it-alls had been 
predicting their divorce almost before 
Dinah's and George's signatures had 
dried on their marriage license back 
on December 5, 1943. Even at that time 
one gossip columnist went so far as to 
declare in print: "On their way back 
from their Montana honeymoon, George 
Montgomery and Dinah Shore will stop 
at Reno to break it up." 

What gave rise to this "incompati- 
bility" notion in the first place? 

Well, Hollywood sophisticates just 
couldn't figure out what George could 
see in Dinah or why lie would want to 



marry her. He wasn't an established 
star when he first met her — he'd just 
made a few run-of-the-mill Westerns — 
but, with a powerful physique and 
rugged good looks that had columnists 
calling him "the second Clark Gable," 
his career was very promising indeed. 

Sure, the Eddie Cantor radio show 
had made Dinah a most popular singer, 
but her hair was kind of stringy, and 
she had buck teeth and, all in all, she 
was sort of plain. 

Not the kind of girl a fellow who 
had dated Linda Darnell, Ginger Rog- 
ers, Lana Turner, Ann Rutherford and 
Marlene Dietrich would fall for. Not 
the kind of girl a fellow would turn to 
when he was already engaged to Hedy 
Lamarr. 

But the know-it-alls didn't know a 
few essential things. 

They didn't really know George. 

They didn't really know Dinah. 

They didn't really know the power 
of love. 

It was back in the early '40s that 
Dinah fell in love with George Mont- 
gomery. She'd been making a personal 
appearance in Atlantic City, and one 
day she and her girl friend went to a 
movie. Dinah promptly fell fast asleep. 

She woke up just in time to see 
George Montgomery's face in a close-up 
on the screen. 

She gasped. Then she nudged her 
friend and said, "Where has he been all 
my life? That's the man I'm going to 
marry." 

Her friend laughed and said, "Stop 
dreaming and go back to sleep." 

Subsequently, Dinah learned that 
George was rumored to be engaged to 
Hedy Lamarr. "I felt sorry for her," 
Dinah recalled later, "because I knew 
/ was going to marry him." 

Dinah's determination, and a little 
tricky help by Fate, made her dream 
come true. In 1943, she was singing for 
servicemen at the U.S.O. Hollywood 
Canteen, but she hadn't forgotten 
George. She couldn't forget him, even 
though she'd only seen him once, and 
then on the screen. And she confided to 
some girl friends who shared a Holly- 
wood apartment with her that she was 
in love with him. 

In her own words, Dinah related 
what happened next. "I was getting 
ready to go to the Canteen one night 
when I suddenly had the feeling I was 
going to meet George that night," she 
told a reporter. 

"Sure enough, I did. He asked me 
for a date. After that night, we never 
had a date with anyone else. 

"I took him right home to prove to 
my roommates that my intuition was 
working right and that meeting George 
Montgomery was not just a dream, as 
they had insisted." 

George called on her the next morn- 
ing, Sunday, after taking his mother to 
church. And he brought Dinah a bunch 
of violets. 

It was easy to see why Dinah had 
fallen for George. She'd been an out- 
sider all her life: As a child she'd been 
skinny "Fannye" Shore, a member 



of the only Jewish family in the town 
of Winchester, Tennessee — population, 
2,500 — and the victim of anti-Semitic 
taunts; as she grew up she was 
teased about her gimpy leg, the after- 
math of a polio attack when she 
was 18 months old; as an adolescent 
with a long, thin face topped by 
straight, brown curls that looked "like 
they were ironed," and a scrawny body, 
she felt positively ugly in comparison 
to her beautiful mother ("I had only to 
look in the mirror to know I wasn't 
pretty," she recalled later) ; as a young 
woman, when she went to New York to 
try to become a singer, she felt guilty. 
("Daddy thought that what I was try- 
ing to do was disgraceful. To him, only 
brazen women were in show business.") 

With a background like that, is it 
any wonder she said, "I had to be 
loved," and that George Montgomery 
was the man she chose? 

But what about George? Why did 
this 200-pound, six-foot-two ladies' man 
choose her? 

Despite his attractiveness to women, 
George was bashful and shy, and just 
didn't feel at home with super-glamour 
girls. That bunch of violets he brought 
to Dinah the day after they first met— 
that was the tip-off. He was a shy, 
romantic guy looking for an old-fash- 
ioned girl. 

His own words explain how he felt 
when he met Dinah: "What attracted 
me to Dinah was the same quality I 
saw in my mother; she was so gen- 
erous." 

And so they were married. 

Marriages are made of this 

Their "incompatibility" survived a 
honeymoon on George's sister's Mon- 
tana ranch during which George worked 
from sunrise to sundown in the fields 
helping get in the hay and during 
which Dinah had to wake up each day 
before dawn to cook breakfast for four- 
teen hungry farmhands. 

Their marriage survived her burning 
good steaks until they tasted like 
charred leather and her habit of just 
dropping her clothes on the floor 
wherever she happened to change. 

Their marriage survived and pros- 
pered and was blessed with children: 
Melissa Ann ("Missy"), born in 1948, 
and John David ("Jody"). adopted in 
1954. 

So much for the charge that Dinah 
and George "had been incompatible 
from almost the beginning," but how 
about the accusation that Dinah spent 
too much time being the big television 
star and had neglected George? 

This being a wife and a celebrity, 
too, was a problem. But Dinah faced it 
squarely. "My biggest fear," she ad- 
mitted, "is that with my work I'm 
taking something away from George 
and the children." 

But she worked out what seemed to 
be a practical solution. 

In words, she put it this way : "George 
and I have a sort of unspoken but 
clearly understood agreement of what's 



important in our lives. There's no ques- 
tion about it. To us, our children and 
ourselves come first. George and I love 
show business, but we know our ca- 
reers in it can't last forever. I'm much 
more interested in the success and 
durability of my life as Mrs. George 
Montgomery than my career as Dinah 
Shore." 

In actions, she made sure that she 
spent all possible time with her hus- 
band and children, and hardly let a 
day go by that she didn't drive home 
from the studio to have dinner with the 
family — even if she then had to drive 
back to the studio for more work. 

A much more serious problem in the 
Montgomerys' marriage was summed 
up in the speculation that "George 
couldn't stand the fact that his career 
was going nowhere while Dinah was 
more successful than ever." 

George seemed to be content in tak- 
ing a back seat while his wife was in 
the career-driver's seat. He seemed to 
be content with puttering around in his 
basement workshop making furniture, 
a hobby that suddenly blossomed out 
into a successful business. He seemed 
to be satisfied in just making an occa- 
sional picture — actually, about fifty pic- 
tures in which he always saved the old 
homestead or captured the rustlers. 

But it couldn't have been easy, some- 
times, to hear himself referred to as 
"Dinah Shore's husband" or to re- 
member that he'd once been heralded 
as "a star of today and a movie great 
of tomorrow." 

Not that Dinah didn't try to involve 
him in her own career and success; she 
did. She consulted him every point 
along the way, she asked for and de- 
pended upon his candid and honest re- 
actions to her performances. She often 
had him as a guest on her Chevy Show. 
As the years went by, the transforma- 
tion of "plain 'Fannye' Shore" into 
"glamorous Dinah Shore" was almost 
miraculous. In 1955 and 1956, she re- 
ceived Emmy awards for being the best 
female singer, and in 1957, 1958 and 
1959, she was given the same prized 
statuettes for being television's out- 
standing female personality. During the 
past twelve months, she was awarded 
fifteen top honors, including a citation 
by the Gallup poll as "one of the ten 
most admired women in the world," a 
distinction shared with such ladies as 
Helen Keller and Eleanor Roosevelt. 

But George — rankling, according to 
some of his friends, at just being "Mr. 
Shore" — tried to revive his own stagnant 
career by starring in ■ a TV show, 
Cimarron City. The show was neither 
successful nor unsuccessful, neither 
praised nor panned. It just stumbled 
along and then folded. 

Of course, it was a shock to Dinah 
when the Chevrolet people didn't re- 
new her own contract after five long 
and profitable years. It was a shock 
and yet it was also a blessing in dis- 
guise. Now she could cut down her 
shows from twenty to ten a year, now 
she could see more of George and the 
kids. 

"The kids are getting bigger, and 
now, for the first time, I get home when 
they're getting home from school," she 



said. "You know, you can drive your- 
self crazy trying not to let your show 
interfere with your family. Actually, 1 
wanted to cut down to only two shows 
this year, but I didn't quite make it." 

She said something else, too, in a 
kind of desperation that came from the 
heart of a woman who realized her mar- 
riage was shaky: "The only thing I 
want most out of life is to be a good 
wife and mother. If I accomplish that 
goal, it will be there long after the 
spotlights and the microphones are 
gone." 

But something else was happening to 
Dinah's marriage, too, something that 
a cut-down TV schedule and more time 
at home with the family couldn't help. 
George was being seen in the company 
of "other" women. 

Rumors about that had started more 
than two years ago, but then they were 
shrugged off as being "silly." After all, 
Hollywood is the "biggest small town 
of them all," where if a man has lunch 
with a woman, the columnists record 
it the following day; and if a man 
kisses a woman on the cheek or holds 
her arm while crossing the street, every- 
one is convinced they're having an 
affair. 

George was trying to start all over 
again as a producer-director-actor, so it 
was natural that he be seen in the 
company of pretty actresses. George 
was trying to learn the techniques of 
being a director, so it made sense that 
he'd hang around the sets of Hawaiian 
Eye, 77 Sunset Strip, Maverick, and 
SurfSide 6. It was on the set of the 
latter show that the rumors started 
flying about George and Diane McBain. 
"He couldn't keep his eyes off her," 
one of the crew members confided. 
"The two spent a lot of time together 
talking. It was kept very hush-hush, 
naturally, as he was a married man." 
Diane insists there was no romantic 
attachment between her and George, 
yet one of her close friends claims that 
they did date and that he (the friend) 
had the two of them up for dinner one 
night at his apartment. 

The relationship — if one existed — 
was just a passing one. "She wouldn't 
have given him a second look," one 
friend says, "if she thought that his 
marriage was a happy one. Yet George, 
in the Philippines, made it clear that 
he and Dinah were headed for a divorce 
court." 

The Philippines — when George went 
there to make two pictures, the rumors 
began in earnest, except that they in- 
volved another "other" woman, sexy 
Israeli actress Ziva Rodann. 

On the day after Christmas two years 
ago, George took off for the Philippines 
for location shots. He stayed six 
months. 

On her Christmas show that year, 
Dinah had Missy as her guest. The 
appearance of daughter and mother to- 
gether on the program helped to foster 
the image of Dinah as a devoted wife 
and mother who considered show busi- 
ness just a sideline. 

But George was far away. 
Today, some people even go so far 
as to claim that her sponsors, last 
season, insisted that Dinah preserve 



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the illusion that everything was going 
well with her marriage, because they 
were afraid that she'd lose popularity 
if the truth were to leak out. 

What was the "truth"? 

Well, for one thing, George was be- 
ing linked romantically with seductive 
Ziva Rodann, his co-star in "Samar," 
one of the two films he was making. 
Once, while George and Ziva were eat- 
ing lunch together in a Hong Kong 
hotel, they were interrupted by Italian 
Prince Raimondo Orsini, one of the 
actress's admirers, who in a fit of 
jealousy challenged George to a duel. 
The whole incident was smoothed over 
with apologies by Orsini and a "think 
nothing of it" by George, but it did 
force Ziva to make a statement. 

"My relationship with George Mont- 
gomery was strictly on a business 
basis," she said. "He's a married man — 
and happily married to Dinah Shore." 

On another occasion, when asked how 
Dinah liked the idea of her playing 
love scenes opposite George in "Samar," 
Ziva answered : "She was as nice as one 
could possibly be. I met her at her 
house in Hollywood, and she said, 
'You'd make a wonderful Ana.' That's 
the part I play. You could hardly ask 
anybody to be kinder than that." 

When Ziva and George returned to 
the United States after three months in 
the Philippines, she insisted, "We were 
only good friends," but admitted that, 
when she'd lunched with him in New 
York a week before, "George seemed 
to know something was going to hap- 



pen" to his marriage — although, she 
added, referring to the divorce an- 
nouncement, "I never expected this." 

Then, at the end of the interview, Ziva 
asserted: "It's true I want a husband 
. . . but only mine . . . nobody else's — 
so I wouldn't be interested in Dinah's." 

It is true, however, that, since her re- 
turn from the Philippines, Ziva has 
started turning down dates with Holly- 
wood's eligible bachelors and has bro- 
ken off with one of her steadies, at- 
torney Dan Busby. 

What this indicates about Ziva and 
George — if anything — only time will 
tell. 

At one time, George was also said to 
be interested in newcomer Madlyn Rhue 
and was seen on the lot while she was 
filming "A Majority of One," but if 
Madlyn returned his interest, she cer- 
tainly doesn't now. For the past few 
months, she's been going steady with 
Bill Dana of the Steve Allen Show. 

"Other" women? Career competi- 
tion? Neglect? Incompatibility? What- 
ever the reason or reasons, Dinah did 
the best she could to keep from break- 
ing up her home. 

As one of her intimate friends says, 
"Marriage was so sacred to Dinah she 
could have made such a decision only 
after a lot of soul-searching. This di- 
vorce was building up and building up. 
It wasn't done impulsively, but only 
after long deliberation and attempts by 
her to work out their differences." 

Another person close to Dinah adds, 
"I believe Dinah got up enough nerve 



to ask George for the divorce after 
Rosemary Clooney and Jose Ferrer 
called it quits. The Ferrers were an 
image of a perfectly matched couple. 
Yet, when they separated, there were 
no serious repercussions." 

This same friend, when asked if 
George was surprised and shocked by 
Dinah's decision, answered, "Yes," but 
adds, "George, like Jose Ferrer, prob- 
ably felt that it could never happen. 
However, living as strangers under the 
same roof — the few times when they 
were under the same roof — as George 
and Dinah have been doing for the past 
year, became unbearable." 

Today, when more than thirty-five 
million Americans turn on their TV 
sets, they still see Dinah Shore pranc- 
ing, and dancing and smiling. Before 
she met George Montgomery, she said, 
"I had to be loved." But at the same 
time she said something else, too: "I 
had to win everybody's affection." 

Dinah won everybody else's love, but 
in doing it, she lost George's. Who was 
the woman who broke up her home? 
Tragically, it was Dinah herself. Not 
Dinah the wife and mother, but Dinah 
the woman forced into the many roles 
that go into being a television star. 
Too many demands were made on her; 
too many people — from the sponsors 
to the stagehands — depended on her. 
Somewhere, somehow, in spite of every- 
thing she did to prevent it, Dinah's 
worst fear — that her work would take 
something away from her husband — 
came sadly true. — James Hoffman 



The Upside Down World of George Maharis 



(Continued from page 32) 
most personally sure-footed TV stars to 
come across the tube in the last decade. 
He is one of the few male video lumin- 
aries who have almost as many men fans 
as women. From men, he draws not 
only admiration but respect. Millions of 
men admire and envy male stars — 
few respect them. 

This unusual fact prompts an ex- 
amination of one of the least known 
aspects of Maharis' turned-around pop- 
ularity. It is not easy to explain, but 
an understanding of it gives George a 
prowess and stature that are unique. 

Week after week, Maharis portrays a 
tough, two-fisted roamer whose straight 
talk gets him in and out of trouble. His 
capers with Martin Milner on Route 
66 are, of course, fictional. For years, 
John Wayne and Robert Mitchum por- 
trayed the same kind of hard-headed, 
fist-swinging heroes in their pictures — 
also fictional. 

Yet the private lives of Wayne and 
Mitchum were plagued by anonymous 
challengers who stopped them on the 
street, in bars, any place, to pose the 
question: "I seen you in the movies, 
Mitchum, let's see how tough you really 
are!" That's how the fights started. It 
got so that Mitchum, in particular, 
could not appear in public without 
T having a half-drunken glory-seeker walk 
R up and dare him to fight. 

It does not happen with Maharis. To 
date, he has never been so challenged — 
88 s 



even though he is both shorter and 
lighter in weight than these giants of 
the screen. But Maharis doesn't think 
he is left alone solely because of "re- 
spect." 

"Maybe," he said, "it's because it's 
easy to see that I don't like trouble- 
makers but that I'd never walk away 
from one. Bullies can sense I wouldn't 
try to pacify them or any man who is 
looking for a fight. I know twenty men 
I'd never, but never, pick on — for the 
simple reason that I know they'd tear 
into me with everything they had. We 
don't always expect to win the fight, 
but we are certainly going to raise a 
fat lip or two before we go down! 

"You've heard of a 'sore loser.' Well, 
the man who drops any of the guys I'm 
talking about will be a sore winner — 
and I mean sore — all over. The point 
is that a man who starts fights is either 
a bully or he hopes that the 'big name' 
will back down for fear of bad publicity. 
And I've had it with bullies, anyhow. 

"It may be, too, that I'm not tall 
enough to pick on. Even nature turned 
me around! 

"When I was a kid, I always re- 
sented the proportions of my body. I 
had short legs. I wanted long legs. 
Everybody in the neighborhood had 
long legs. And — as any guy brought 
up in New York City knows — if you've 
got short legs as a kid, you soon learn 
to protect yourself against the long 
legs. 



"I feel better about it now. I still 
don't like the way I look. I never have. 
My eyes squint up when I smile and I 
look Oriental — and they are too nice a 
race of people to have to explain me! 
So, although I don't look like Rock 
Hudson, I don't worry about it. I de- 
cided: To hell with comparing myself. 

"I am what I am and I'm just going 
to have to get along with what I've 
got. The only time I feel peculiar is 
when I'm in a room full of handsome 
men. They wear their damn' suits so 
well. I feel like a truck driver who 
hasn't changed from his work clothes. 
I get next to some of those guys who 
are six foot and better and I experience 
awkwardness. I want to hit them a 
couple of times for looking exactly 
the way I want to look." He grinned. 
"They could at least sit down and give 
me a chance! 

"You see, everything in my life is 
turned around, just the opposite of what 
I want." 

Does that mean he's unhappy with 
success? "Hell, no! But remember — 
success of the kind I have is profes- 
sional. I have more money, more 
friends, more of everything, but suc- 
cess is never a cure-all for what ails 
a guy inside. As a matter of fact, the 
biggest surprise success gives you is a 
more acute sense of your deficiencies. 

"When I was working in a grocery 
store, a few years back, stealing food 
for lunch, it didn't make a damn' bit 



of difference whether I was tall, short, 
skinny, smart or stupid. When you're 
hungry, you have no use for morals, 
principles, ideals or any of that jazz. 
You're hungry and your stomach is 
screaming for food. You have to sur- 
vive. And, besides the hunger, there is 
the panic of desperation. A hungry man 
is a dangerous man. I know it all too 
well. 

"I didn't want to steal food. I used 
to look at a can of mushrooms in my 
hand and want to drop it like a hot 
potato. Because that hand and that can 
said, Maharis, you're a thief! You 
insult yourself, your parents and every 
single person in the world who loves 
you, when you steal. It's no good, and 
it's a terrible memory to carry. 

"You see, it is worse now than it 
was then. It's a hangover of guilt and 
it kills you, almost. I've paid for that 
food a thousand times," he said, his 
face a study in shame and remorse, 
"with a miserable memory." 

Perhaps, a woman would someday 
ease, not only the memories, but his 
imagined shortcomings? 

He nodded. "You may be right. But 
it looks like love is away in a trunk 
until I unpack Route 66. I'm a profes- 
sional fly-by-night. The kind of women 
who attract me don't want a guy who 
is in Pittsburgh on Monday, and Miami 
on Wednesday, and God-knows-where 
on Sunday. I can't offer that kind of life 
to a woman — especially the woman I 
loved. 

"That brings up another odd side of 
that turned-around world of mine. I've 
always heard about the one girl for 



the one man. It may sound foolish and 
it might suggest that I'm a little too 
eager to love, but I've seen fifty girls 
I could love. I mean love. The works. 
Engagement, marriage, kids, a good life, 
everything. I think it's nonsense for a 
man to feel that there's only one girl. 
I've seen too many delicious American 
girls, to go for that noise. 

"Oh, I date. But most of my little 
affairs end up like the dead-polar-bear 
caper. The girls I date don't expect 
anything permanent from me. No illu- 
sions. It's a cold and unrewarding kind 
of honesty between a guy and a girl, 
but it's better than kidding ourselves." 

Maharis stared out the window again 
and shook his head slightly, as though 
contemplating something or someone 
very special. "It'll happen to me, I 
hope," he murmured. "God, wouldn't 
it be disaster if it didn't? It's got to! 

"No, it'll happen. And when it does," 
he smiled, "I'll make it worthwhile for 
both of us. I don't know where or how. 
But I'll know and I'll kiss her with a 
hungry mouth and the whole world will 
stop turning just for an instant — just 
for us. 

"That's the moment when my whole 
life will change and go the other way. 
Because, until now, life has given me 
everything. I'd like to start giving a 
little of it back." 

A thought came to him. "I just hope 
she doesn't judge me by my hands!" 
he said. — The End 

George Maharis is Buz Murdock on 
Route 66, seen over CBS-TV, Fri., from 
8:30 to 9:30 P.M. EST. 



The Best Kept Secret in Hollywood 



(Continued from page 47) 
said the few who really knew anything 
about Lome's private life — had been 
over, years ago . . . surely the scars 
had healed by now! Perhaps there'd 
been a hitch in Lome's divorce? Or 
violent objections from his twin chil- 
dren, now seventeen years old? 

There had to be compelling reasons 
for all the hush-hush, but the answers 
weren't easy to find. And Hollywood 
loves a mystery only when its sharp- 
eyed, sharp-tongued ferrets have a track 
to sure-fire clues. The inside dope? It 
took unusually long to gather together 
the tidbits: 

Nancy had been a teen-aged student 
in the Toronto Academy of Radio Arts 
which Lome founded after World War 
//.... They had been in New York at 
the same time, when Lome co-starred 
on Broadway and Nancy continued her 
acting studies in that city. . . . When 
Lome went on to Hollywood and TV 
fame, Nancy had followed not long 
after, to make a movie. . . . In fact, 
she'd appeared with him in one of the 
first Bonanza episodes. . . . 

All very tantalizing, but only frag- 
ments which didn't begin to explain 
why Hollywood — the town that can 
concoct imaginary romances between 
couples who haven't even met — had 
failed to recognize a very genuine one 
right under its nose. Above all, the few 



tidbits they knew didn't reveal how 
Lome Greene had turned the neatest 
trick in filmdom: Concealing all his 
romantic plans until the very moment 
he and Nancy got their marriage li- 
cense ! 

That had been the tip-off. The first 
slip in Lome's and Nancy's well-laid 
plans — though they'd been so sure that 
no one would find out a thing until 
after they were married, perhaps even 
on their honeymoon. They chose a quiet 
December afternoon, when everyone 
else was either working or shopping 
frantically for Christmas, to slip off to 
the seaside town of Santa Monica for 
their license. No one, they felt, would 
recognize "Hollywood" in these two 
sedate citizens clad in everyday clothes. 

Lome, of course, had removed all 
traces of greasepaint, though he'd been 
filming a Bonanza episode, just that 
morning, in full Ben Cartwright regalia. 
He hadn't given even an inkling of his 
plans to Dan Blocker or Michael Lan- 
don or Pernell Roberts, who co-star as 
his sons in the TV series. He was going 
to tell them after the private marriage 
ceremony he and Nancy had arranged 
for the following Sunday in a rabbi's 
chambers. 

All that had to be changed, after 
"Ben Cartwright" was recognized and 
the news of his impending marriage hit 
the headlines. The ceremony was still 





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a private one, with only producer David 
Dortort and his wife in attendance. 
However, it was followed by a big re- 
ception — with all the Bonanza gang on 
hand — in the new home Lome had 
bought in Encino, a few months before. 

So the whole town's still buzzing, 
wondering how and why this true love 
story was kept secret from them for so 
long. To get the real answer, they'd 
have to travel back in time and space. 
More than a decade ago, in Toronto, 
where Lome — once a $10-a-week ad 
agency employe — faced what looked 
like a bright future as one of Canada's 
top radio announcers. He had a lovely 
wife and adorable twin children, a boy 
named Charles and a girl named Linda. 

One of his pet projects was the estab- 
lishment of the Academy of Radio Arts 
in Toronto. And one of his students 
there was Nancy Anne Deale. He 
recognized her talent, she idolized her 
teacher — then recognized as one of the 
best in Canada — but the interest was 
purely academic. It was only by acci- 
dent that they ran into each other again 
in New York, where Lome was play- 
ing the lead opposite Katharine Cornell 
in "The Prescott Proposals," and Nancy 
had enrolled at the Neighborhood Play- 
house School of the Theater. 

Their paths didn't cross again until 
both were in Hollywood. By then, 



Lome was highly successful in both 
movies and television, and Nancy her- 
self had come far as a dramatic actress. 
Her talent had also been recognized by 
John Cassavetes, one of her stage men- 
tors, who cast her in his motion pic- 
ture, "Shadows." And, in 1959, she ap- 
peared in an episode of Bonanza. (For 
those who like to study the archives, 
note that Nancy uses the name of Lisa 
Cummings and that she played the 
role of Bila in "The Story of Ruth.") 

During these active years, Lome's 
marriage became a mirage. Not because 
of another woman, but because of a 
combination of troubles created mainly 
by distance — Lome was in Hollywood 
and his wife remained in Canada. Two 
years ago, Lome and Nancy realized 
they were in love. 

But it wasn't until last year that the 
divorce agreement was worked out. 

And thereby hangs the reason for all 
the mystery about Lome's second mar- 
riage. He was thinking of his children. 

Lome has always been a very devoted 
family man. Even after his marriage 
first went on the rocks, he kept in close 
contact with Charles and Linda, spent 
many a sleepless weekend on planes 
flying to and from Canada just so he 
could spend a few hours with the twins. 

Now he confides to a very close 
friend: "Nancy and I had been plan- 



ning our marriage for some time, and 
worked out all the details. However, 
because of my schedule, one detail 
couldn't be attended to — a very impor- 
tant one. I wanted personally to tell 
my children, who are seventeen now, 
that I was getting married again. I 
wanted to explain it to them like a 
father should." 

Lome had planned to meet his chil- 
dren in New York to tell them, but the 
carefully guarded news got out before 
he had a chance to tell the twins about 
their "other mother" with all the hon- 
esty and wisdom of Ben Cartwright 
himself. 

There was a lot to tell, all of it good. 
Nancy Anne Deale is quite a woman. 
Attractive and shapely, she says that 
age makes no difference in marriage, 
believes that love is the one prerequisite 
to a happy home. She's never been 
married before, looks forward to run- 
ning a home, and both Lome and 
Nancy want to have a family all their 
own. 

Lome can now tell Hollywood: "I 

never get to win a girl on Bonanza 

— but, this time, I had better luck!" 

— Irene Storm 

Lome Greene stars in Bonanza, as 
colorcast over NBC-TV, Sun., 9 to 10 
P.M. EST, sponsored by Chevrolet. 



Are Peter and The Wolf Hurting the Kennedys? 



(Continued from page 37) 
John P. Kennedy, the President of the 
United States. 

The President is undoubtedly grate- 
ful for the Clan's past efforts in his be- 
half. Spurred on by fellow-member 
Peter Lawford — Kennedy's own broth- 
er-in-law — they went all out, during the 
political conventions, to get him nomi- 
nated. They didn't spare themselves, 
fighting to get him elected. And, even 
after he became President, they didn't 
stop. They pooled their talents and re- 
sources to throw a benefit party which 
raised two million dollars and helped 
pull the Democratic Party out of debt. 
However, Kennedy is the leader of 
the free world and must be sure nothing 
happens to detract from that image. He 
certainly can't afford friendships which 
later can be used against him political- 
ly. He genuinely admires and respects 
the enormously talented people in the 
Clan, but any reoccurence of their 
famed hijinks and didoes could be a 
handicap to him. 

Edward R. Murrow, head of the U. S. 
Information Agency and one of Ken- 
nedy's closest aides, has asked Holly- 
wood to project a better image of the 
United States. Is this policy really 
helped when brother-in-law Peter plays 
a dissolute Washington Senator in the 
new movie, "Advise and Consent," or 
goes to Europe to play a gangster role 
in his next film? 

There have been rumors that Lawford 

was withdrawing from the Clan, by 

t White House request. It was noted that, 

I for the first time, prankish Peter did not 

join in the much-publicized razzing with 

which the Clan greeted Eddie Fisher's 

90 



opening night in Las Vegas. There were 
also rumors of friction between Peter 
and The Wolf — Lawford and Sinatra 
himself. 

"Friction? Nothing like that!" Pete 
told columnist Earl Wilson, by phone 
from Santa Monica. "Hell, I was down 
at Frank's place in Palm Springs for 
three days afterward!" 

As for pressure on Sinatra from 
Washington, a New York Herald Trib- 
une correspondent recently noted that 
Frankie was interrupted during a maga- 
zine interview, by a "White House" call. 
The performer answered, "Hi, Prez" — 
then told the interviewer, immediately 
afterward, that Kennedy wished to 
"avoid publicity about his personal 
friendships." 

Something seems to have sobered 
Frankie during the past year. Just a 
couple of months ago, a small mob of 
one hundred newsmen, photographers 
and TV reporters waited apprehensively 
at the Sydney, Australia airport for the 
crooner's plane to land. At best, they 
expected the brush-off treatment, but 
they were fully prepared for a typical 
Sinatra blast. 

Instead, Frank greeted them all with 
a smile, while holding tightly to pretty 
actress Dorothy Provine's hand. And, as 
they looked at him in amazement, the 
"new" Sinatra said : "Please, don't refer 
to me as 'cranky Frankie' anymore. I'm 
more mellow these days. I guess there 
was a time when some newspapermen in 
New York and elsewhere got under my 
skin, but you can quote me as saying 
I'm not an enemy of the press anymore. 
Now I'm ready to answer all questions. 
Fire away." 



Among all those newsmen, not one 
had the courage to ask him the burning 
question of the day: Had there been 
any official appeal from the White 
House for the Clan to behave itself lest 
it cause the President any embarrass- 
ment? Perhaps no one thought of ask- 
ing the query, or perhaps someone 
feared offending Frankie Boy and ruin- 
ing his exceptional good humor. 

However, one enterprising scribe did 
shoot the loaded question at Peter Law- 
ford during a Clan gathering in Wash- 
ington, where the actor was filming 
"Advise and Consent." Pete looked sur- 
prised for a moment, then blurted out: 
"Nonsense! I happen to know that the 
President thinks a lot of Frank. He was 
effusive in his praise of him after Frank 
staged the Inaugural Ball. Of course, 
they like each other. What the hell's 
wrong with that?" 

If indeed no Presidential pressure has 
been exerted, then each and every mem- 
ber of the Clan deserves a gold star for 
exercising considerable self-discipline. 
Peter himself set the standard for the 
group's behavior when he ordained that 
he wouldn't tolerate any Kennedy in-law 
jokes on any TV shows for which he 
was booked. 

"The Garry Moore programs I've 
done had no reference to Kennedy or 
the Presidency," Pete notes. "And the 
Jack Benny show I did failed to contain 
a single sketch regarding my relation- 
ship with the President. If anything like 
that did occur, I would have vetoed it." 

Pete — or "Peter Pentagon," as he is 
fondly referred to by the Clan — is still 
shook up by the fact he is J.F.K.'s 
brother-in-law. "It's an awesome kind of 



feeling when I realize that the Presi- 
dent of the United States is my brother- 
in-law," he says. "Sometimes, I stop 
dead in my tracks and say: Can it be? 
Or, gee, I know him! He's related to 
me!" 

The ironic side of this relationship is 
that, prior to Kennedy's election, Law- 
ford was much the bigger celebrity. 
Kennedy was just another Senator, and 
not a very famous one, at that. Millions 
of movie fans recognized the British- 
born Lawford at a glance, but the 
Massachusetts politico could have 
passed unnoticed in a crowd. Now, of 
course, the situation is different. 

The lanky thirty-eight-year-old actor 
dismisses any notion that Kennedy's as- 
cendancy to the highest office in the 
land affected his career. "I'm a little 
more newsworthy," he says. "That's 
about all. I think my career got a big 
boost when I did 'Exodus.' I'm delight- 
ed that it happened long before he be- 
came President." 

Lawford also shrugs off the notion 
that Kennedy is displeased when he 
takes a role which might hold this 
country up to criticism. In "Advise and 
Consent," for instance, Pete portrays a 
playboy Senator whom foreign audi- 
ences might logically accept as truly 
representative of our government. 

"Obviously," says Pete, "if the Presi- 
dent had asked me not to take the part, 
I wouldn't have. But it should be equal- 
ly obvious that he wouldn't have said 
anything to me about it, because the 
fact that I was offered such a role 
couldn't reflect on the President. He's 
bright enough to see that. He's also too 
busy to be concerned about trivialities 
like that." 

Pete doesn't think he's changed at all 
since his brother-in-law took residency 
in the White House. His friends are 
quick to agree. Top comedienne Carol 
Burnett, of The Garry Moore Show, 
claims he's still a "dear nut." Says she: 
"I was very much in awe of Pete when 
I first met him. I expected him to be 
conceited, but actually he's a little shy. 
He holds himself in. But we had a ball 
together. He got along with everyone — 
and, as you know, our gang is as far re- 
moved from the Clan as you can get. 

"No one kidded him about the White 
House," Carol notes. "You can run that 
kind of thing right into the ground. The 
last time he was on the show, he kidded 
around something awful. Right in the 
middle of my number, he jumped on the 
stage and kissed me. Imagine! I was 
kissed by Peter Lawford!" 

As Carol points out, no one thinks it's 
quite cricket to kid about the White 
House. But before Kennedy was elected, 
the jokes flew like guided missiles. 
When he arrived in Las Vegas early in 
his Presidential climb, he roared with 
laughter as Joey Bishop said to him, 
from the stage of a night club: "If you 
get in, Frank Sinatra has to be Ambas- 
sador to Italy and Sammy Davis Jr. to 
Israel. I don't want too much for myself 
— just don't let me get drafted again!" 

Kennedy always has appreciated 
good, lively humor. When he was a 
bachelor Senator in Hollywood, every- 
one considered the handsome New Eng- 
lander a "hip guy." Actress Arlene 
Dahl, who dated Kennedy quite a bit in 



those days, told this reporter in an ex- 
clusive interview : "Jack made a big hit 
in Hollywood. He was extremely intelli- 
gent and idealistic. He had some won- 
derful ideas about South America, I re- 
member. I thought of him as a bashful 
boy with cheek. He never talked about 
any Presidential ambitions." 

Even today, J.F.K. takes an avid in- 
terest in the entertainment world. He 
and his wife often have new movies sent 
to them for private screening, such as 
"Flower Drum Song." When he is in 
New York and has available time, he 
makes it a point to see a Broadway 
play. And it's not unlikely that, when 
the President and his brother-in-law, 
Pete, get on the golf course, they chat 
occasionally about show business. 

It may be that it was on the links, 
too, that the subject of a subdued Clan 
was mentioned. But Lawford denies this 
vehemently. "I'll tell you what happens 
when we play golf," says Pete. "I have 
to wear shoes. After all, he is the Presi- 
dent of the United States." 

The very mention of the word Clan 
irritates Pete, anyhow. "Actually," he 
says, "it's just a group of people who 
have known each other for years and 
like each other. We like to get together 
and that's all. I've known Frank seven- 
teen years, Dean about ten. This is just 
a group of friends — like you. might 
have." 

The group of people comprising the 
Clan today includes Sinatra, Lawford, 
Sammy Davis Jr., Dean Martin, Joey 
Bishop, Shirley MacLaine, Keely Smith, 
Natalie Wood and Milton Berle. Many 
celebs such as Sal Mineo and Bobby 
Rydell would like to become "mem- 
bers," but realize they are too young — 
or simply not wanted. 

As of this writing, no member of the 
Clan has got out of line where he'd 
cause Kennedy any misgivings. At least, 
their behavior to date has detracted not 
one atom from Kennedy's popularity. 
According to a recent Gallup poll, the 
President's policies are deemed perfect 
by 75 percent of the American people. 

The biggest detractors of the Clan 
seem to be Republicans — which figures. 
After all, every member of the Clan is a 
lifetime Democrat. It might be a good 
idea if the G.O.P. formed a Clan of its 
own for the next Presidential campaign. 

Arlene Dahl may have been thinking 
along these same lines when she re- 
vealed that she voted for Nixon in the 
'60 race. "I felt sorry for Nixon. It 
seemed all the stars had come out for 
Kennedy," she says. "It was unfair. I 
know Jack didn't mind me not voting 
for him — he always liked a challenge. 
But his sister Pat has been cool to me 
ever since." 

There's no doubt that Pat Lawford is 
a loyal sister to the President — or that 
she's married to a loyal man. When 
wags refer to Messrs. Lawford and 
Sinatra as "Peter and The Wolf," 
they're really drawing a sharp distinc- 
tion between Pat's devoted husband and 
the ever-dating Frankie. They're also 
drawing attention to the close relation- 
ship between the Clan of Hollywood 
and the family in the White House. 

Is this politics? Or just natural hu- 
man interest in some of the world's 
most famous names? — Bob Lardine 



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NEW DESIGNS FOR LIVING 



7283— Tots love Tommy Turtle. He's a well- 
padded playcushion. Fun to sit on when 
watching TV. Make Tommy of scraps. Pat- 
tern pieces, directions for 15 ^ x 19-inch 
cushion. 354 



7331 — Be thrifty! Make new rugs from old 
rags. Our instructions tell how to weave, 
braid, hook, crochet. Directions for 9 dif- 
ferent rugs, patterns, list of materials needed. 

254 



806 — Colorful vegetables to embroider on 
towels. A child can do these easy motifs. 
Transfer of six designs 5% x 6% inches; 
directions. 254 



7082 — Cross-stitch motifs for garments or 
linens look like applique. Thirty motifs 
from V-f-i x 1% inches to 5 x 6 1 /4- Use gay, 
contrasting colors. 254 



7283 




92 



971 — Choose a rainbow of colors for dresses 
and bonnets; add a bit of stitchery. Any 
little girl will love this appliqued quilt. 
Charts; patch patterns; directions. 254' 

916 — From birds to butterflies — turn bias- 
tape scraps into bright trims for tots' clothes ; 
use on pillows, curtains; frame as pictures. 
Thirteen 4 x /2 x 5% to 5*4 x lO^-inch motifs. 

254 



7075— These lovely doilies cost so little 
to crochet in string. Use for luncheon table, 
as dresser or buffet set. Easy directions for 
two oval doilies. 254 



Send orders (in coin) to: TV Radio Mirror, Needlecraft Service, P.O. Box 137, Old Chelsea Station, New York 11, 
New York. Add 54 for each pattern for first-class mailing. Send 254 for Needlecraft Catalogue (as illustrated above). 




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THREE BRECK SHAMPOOS FOR THREE DIFFERENT HAIR CONDITIONS 
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I enclose $ and a boxtop, label or facsimile from 

any Breck Preparation for my: □ Breck Natural 
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Offer limited to one brush per person 



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Allow 30 days for delivery — Offer expires Sept. 1, 1962 7 



SPECIAL BRECK HAIRBRUSH OFFER 

As a special value, Breck now offers a $5.75 
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Hairbrush for only $1.00 and a boxtop, 
label or facsimile from any Breck 
Preparation. This special offer gives you 
the opportunity to own a quality Breck 
Hairbrush at a saving of up to $3.75 








THAT 

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LOOK 








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ike Landon Talks About: "OUR BLACK MARKET BABY!" 







famous doctor discusses : 

iVHAT TV IS DOING TO 
FACKIE & HER CHILDREN 



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LIGHTS . . . ACTION . . . CAMERA! 

... on the world of show business 
and the names that make news in 
that exciting world. 

For 50 years PHOTOPLAY has 
taken its readers behind the scenes 
of the entertainment world for ex- 
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stories, full-color portraits, and 
photographs of the stars at work, 
at play, at home. 



For the latest on Liz Taylor, Eddie 
Fisher, Sandra Dee, Bobby Darin, 
Debbie Reynolds, Marilyn Monroe, 
Troy Donahue, Bobby Rydell, and 
all your other favorites, don't miss 
a single issue of PHOTOPLAY 
Magazine. 



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The new "Dark-Eyes" is not new ... it is 28 
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APRIL, 1962 



Ernie Kovacs 

Ed Sullivan 

Michael Landon 

Richard Chamberlain 

Vincent Edwards 

Jimmy Durante 

Barbara Stanwyck 

Raymond Burr 

Richard Boone 

Herb Saxton 

Robert Horton 

Quiz Scandals 

Frank Sinatra 

Jacqueline Kennedy 

Judy Garland 

Bud Collyer 

Connie Stevens 

Glenn Ford 

John Ashley 



MIDWEST EDITION 



VOL. 57, NO. 5 



IT HAPPENED THIS MONTH IWIIiPWl^ 

10 "Every Day Was Velvet" Hal Humphrey 

21 "I Can Never Make Up with Jack Paar" Jim Morse 

22 "Our Black Market Baby" Nancy Anderson 

24 Battle of the Bedside Manner! Tricia Hurst 

28 Heart to Heart and Nose to Nose Maxine Block 

30 Is It Friendship or Is It . . ? Eunice Field 

32 So Ugly He's Beautiful! George Carpozi Jr. 

34 Is TV's Money Man Looking for You? Bill Kelsay 

36 "Marilyn Boils My Bear" Charlotte Dinter 

38 The Winner Who Got Away With It John R. Pascal 

42 Wedding Bells Go Ringadingding Walter Winchell 

44 What TV Is Doing to Jackie and Her Children 

Dr. Robert L. Wolk and Arthur Henley 

47 Judy: The Myth and the Mother Lynn Jackson 

50 Thou Shalt Not Fear (first reprint from his new book) 

52 A New Twist on the Twist 

54 A New Twist on Love Jim Gregory 

56 How Much Should a Husband Tell? John Ashley 



-BONUS: A MAGAZINE WITHIN A MAGAZINE 



13 Johnny Carson's Corner 

13 Save Our Songs 

14 Album Reviews 
18 Top Ten Singles 



18 A Life in Song (Garland) 

19 Lunch With Dion 

19 Pieces of Eights 

20 Music-Makers in the News 



WHAT'S NEW? WHAT'S UP? 



3 Information Booth 68 Photographers' Credits 

4 What's New From Coast to Coast Eunice Field 



SPECIAL: YOUR MIDWEST FAVORITES 



Soupy Sales 61 

Bob Hill 62 

Rae Deane 64 

Richard Grossenheider 66 



JACK J. PODELL. Editor-in-Chief 

EUNICE FIELD, West Coast Editor 
TERESA BUXTON, Managing Editor 
LORRAINE BIEAR, Associate Editor 
ANITA ZATT, Assistant to Editor 



It's Happy Time (ABC-TV) 
Breakfast with Bob (WANE-TV) 
"Kidult" Kapers (WJRT-TV) 
The Wild Ones (KMOX-TV) 



CLAIRE SAFRAN, Editor 

JACK ZASORIN, Art Director 
FRANCES MALY, Associate Art Director 
PAT BYRNE, Art Assistant 
BARBARA MARCO, Beauty Editor 



% it» 




TV Radio Mirror is published monthly by Macfadden Publications, Inc., New York, N. Y. Executive, Adver- 
tising and Editorial Offices at 205 East 42nd St., New York 17, N. Y. Editorial branch office, 434 North Rodeo 
Drive, Beverly Hills, Calif. Gerald A. Bartell, Chairman of the Board and President; Frederick A. Klein, Executive 
Vice President-General Manager; Robert L. Young, Vice President; S. N. Himmelman, Vice President; Lee B. 
Bartell, Secretary. Advertising offices also in Chicago and San Francisco. 

Subscription Rates: In the U.S., its possessions and Canada, one year, $3.00; two years, $5; three years, $7.50. 
All other counties, $5.50 per year. Change of Address: 6 weeks' notice essential. Send your old as well as your 
new address to TV Radio Mirror, 205 E. 42nd St., New York 17, N. Y. 
Manuscripts and Photographs: Publisher cannot be responsible for loss or damage. 

Foreign editions handled through Macfadden Publications International Corp., 205 East 42nd Street, New York 
17, N. Y. Gerald A. Bartell, President; Douglas Lockhart, Vice President. 

Second-class postage paid at New York, N. Y., and other additional post offices. Authorized as second-class 
mail by the Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. Copyright 1962 by Macfadden 
Publications, Inc. All rights reserved. Copyright under the Universal Copyright Convention and International 
Copyright Convention. Copyright reserved under Pan American Copyright Convention. Title trademark registered 
in U.S. Patent Office. Printed in U.S.A. Member of Macfadden Women's Group. 






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Wanted: Five "Characters" 

Z?ear Editor: 

I would like to know why such a fine 
program as From These Roots was 
taken off the air. The skit replacing it 
is so inferior that it isn't worth watch- 
ing. I tried to get interested but every 
day it was like a broken record repeat- 
ing the same theme — Daddy is in the 
hospital and there isn't any money and 
there isn't any money and there isn't 
any money and on and on. The girls 
are foolish and immature. Why not put 
girls with character before the public? 
I know that you aren't responsible, but 
I just wanted to tell my opinion to some- 
one. Thanks for listening. 

G.C., Howell, Mich. 



'International" Breed 



/ would like to know something about 
Greg Roman of The New Breed. 

C.M.B., Lima, Ohio 

Greg Roman might be called an 
"international" personality. His name 
sounds Italian. On ABC-TV's The New 
Breed, he plays a Mexican-American. 
His parents are Turkish-Armenian. He 
was born in Canada. Today he lives in 
California. But, no matter what his 
inter-nationality, one thing is sure, his 
acting ability is such that any country 
would be happy to claim him. . . . Dark- 
haired, dark-eyed Greg began his career 
in his native Canada appearing in little- 
theater groups. From there he went on 
to a Hollywood theater workshop, to 
Broadway, to road companies, to movies, 
and eventually to TV. ... It was while 
Greg was studying acting with Broad- 
way director Frank Corsaro that he 
met his actress-wife Donna Drew. They 
were married April 4, 1958, and now 



Greg Roman 




conduct an experimental workshop for 
actors, writers and directors in Hol- 
lywood. — Ed. 



Some Quickies 



Please tell me where and when 
George Nader was born. 

R.W.A., Eastside, Oregon 

He was born in Hollywood on October 
19, 1921.— Ed. 

Could you please tell me if Shirley 
Temple Black has been married more 
than once and how old she is? 

B.C., Lincoln, Nebraska 

Shirley was married once before, to 
John Agar. She is 32. — Ed. 

/ would like to know if Lee Marvin 
and Tony Marvin are related? 

I.D., Genoa, Colorado 
They are not related. — Ed. 

Calling All Fans 

The following fan clubs invite new 
members. If you are interested, write 
to address given — not to TV Radio 
Mirror. 

Jimmy Dean Fan Club, Patricia Idol, 
1626 Monroe St., N.W., Washington 10, 
D.C. 

Steve Lawrence and Eydie Gorme 
Fan Club, Linda Bienvenue, 165 Phil- 
lip St., Attleboro, Mass. 

Steve London Fan Club, Julie Ve- 
reecke, 2051 Second Ave., New York 
29, N.Y. 

Jane Morgan Fan Club, Sue Kelly, 
3415 King Edward Ave., Montreal 28, 
Quebec. 



Write to Information Booth, TV Radio Mirror, 
205 E. 42nd St., New York 17, N.Y. We regret 
we cannot answer or return unpublished letters. 




I was too 
unimaginative 
to try it 

I couldn't imagine the difference Tampax 

might make ! 

I put up with the other way for years! 

And was miserable! 

When I finally tried Tampax®, I found it 

to be so easy, so cool, so clean, so fresh, 

so invisible, so everything. 

I wonder how I ever existed without it. 




I was 
afraid to try it 

I couldn't face the thought of internal 

protection. 

Millions of girls may have used billions of 

Tampax, but I was the hold-out. 

So I put up with odor problems, disposal 

problems, carrying problems. All the 

embarrassment ! 

Until one day I woke up ! 

Why on earth did I endure years of 

discomfort? 

Tampax is so much nicer, there's just no 

comparison. 



TAMPAX 



Incorporated 
Palmer, Mass. 



Three's a Coward: While making 
"Rome Adventure," director Delmer 
Daves took a drive with Troy Donahue 
and Suzanne Pleshette. Eager to 
show off his new Vespi, Troy whirled at 
top speed around wicked curves, up 
and down hills and finally came to a 
tire-smoking stop, inches from a stone 
wall. Suzanne, indignant, threw a slap 
in Troy's direction but it hit Daves in- 
stead. Bitter words were traded and 
Daves ducked repeatedly. But on the 
trip home, Troy's arm was about Suz- 
anne's shoulder and she slept blissfully 
on his. Next day, Troy asked the direc- 
tor along for another drive. Daves 
turned pale. "You go on alone. You 
two deserve each other — that was the 
hardest-hitting scene you've ever done!" 



Sfop! Look! 

Slaxt jieaduAa-'KaW/ 

TV ttoJdD /^LAAjCK, 
bhlMOS t|DM. 



by EUNICE FIELD 



Deborah Walley an- 
nounced plans to 
wed John Ashley in 
the summer. . . . 
Cindy Robbins and 
Jack Haley Jr. have 
definitely discovered each 
other. . . . and Molly Bee 
"flits" from Ron Ely (now in 
the service) to Australian 
beau Digby Wolfe, who 
also has an eye for 
Helen O'Connell. . . . 
Sixteen-year-old 
Anna Capri, new 
Warner starlet, is see- 
ing a lot of Bobby 
Burgess, Welk dancer. 



TV fans are beginning to make them- 
selves heard. Soon after The Law And 
Mr. Jones was cancelled, half a million 
cards, wires and letters were flooding 
ABC-TV. Even the Bar Association of 
seven states joined in the hue and cry. 
Now belatedly the network announces 
that the show will return April 19. Says 
its popular star, James Whitmore, "It 
just proves that the individual viewer 
can have control over what he has to 
see." It's a pity the public couldn't 
do the same for The Westerner and 
other fine shows cancelled for no good 
reason — but maybe Mr. Jones has 
started a trend. The networks are be- 
ing inundated with protests of TV 
"specials," which fans contend aren't 
T "special" at all — just run-of-the-mill. 




Party of the Month: Ron Harper's 

birthday cake had 87 candles — not for 
his age, of course, but in honor of 
87th Precinct, in which he co-stars. He 
made chili for over 60 guests, but his 
actor-pal Mike Carr sent Ron a case 
of canned chili to be on the safe side. 
Ron gave lessons in the "Holly-Golly," 
another of the Twist improvisations, 
and Mario Thomas and Peter Falk 
were judged best. Sarah Marshall 
and Karl Held, a long-time twosome, 
were cooing as usual and seemed not 
the least concerned that Karl's option 
for Perry Mason had just been dropped. 
"It was great fun," said Ron, "but as a 
Hollywood party it was a bust. Nobody 
got tossed in the pool and nobody 
even socked somebody else's beau." 






Almost everybody who 
is anybody showed 
up for "The Major- 
ity of One" premiere. 
Star Rosalind Russell is 
a 10-to-l favorite to grab 
this year's Oscar. . . . Bob 
Crosby's Cathy, now wed to 
Texas oilman E. F. Gilbert, 
has retired completely, she 
reports, and is on expect- 
ant mother. . . . Annette 
eft for Italy this month 
v, to star in "Escapade 
in Florence," and will 
be gone five months. 
Her family is flying over 
for the Easter vacation. 



And Ty Hardin remains the town's 
Number One "Roving Bachelor at 
Large" — with a new girl on his arm 
almost every night. Ty's blond hair 
was darkened for his role in The Chap- 
man Report, in which he plays a brawny 
football player. Director George Cu- 
kor felt Ty's natural hair made him 
photograph "too handsomely." . . . 
Walt Disney's Mickey Mouse Club 
returns soon via re-runs on ABC-TV. . . . 
Martin Gabel plays Hercule Poirot in 
new MGM Agatha Christie series. 



It's Good To Be Bad: So says Dan 
Duryea, who has made a career of 
playing villains. For actors who want 
to be heavies, Dan has this tip: "First 
thing, kick a dog. Step number two, 
slap a dame. You will then receive 
10,000 letters yelling about what a rat 
you are. After that, you'll be remem- 
bered every time they're casting a 
villain." . . . Myrna Fancy's skating 
and skiing antics are giving producers 
of Father Of The Bride cold feet. 
They've ordered her to "cease and 
desist" before she has a bad spill and 
puts their shooting schedule in deep 
freeze. And Bob Conrad failed to get 
his "flying" orders. Warner Bros, told 
the "Hawaiian Eye" he was grounded 
— had to give up plans to buy a plane. 



Quip-Quack: A visitor on the "Kid 
Galahad" set observed Elvis Presley 
showing Anita Wood around. Sez he, 
"Elvis, there are two things I envy — 
your list of phone numbers and your 
stamina." . . . Molly Berg misses New 
York. Her rented mansion on the West 
Coast, she says, is "elegant but lone- 
some. If I open a window to yoohoo, 
all I get back is an echo." . . . Since 
she was named Honorary Mayor of 
Reseda, Calif., Amanda Blake, Gun- 
smoke's Kitty, has decided to move 
into the town. "You heard of absentee 
landlords," she says. "Well, I don't 
want to be an absentee mayor." . . . 
Chirps Rita Moreno, "If women writers 
were more feminine, women actresses 
would have better parts." 




Troy and Suzanne. Cozy — or not? 



As Vanessa, queen of the TV daytime 
serial, Love Of Life, Peggy McCay 
suffered every conceivable anguish. 
When fourteen femme fans named 
their daughters after Vanessa, Peggy 
sent each baby a doll — until one fan 
returned the doll and asked her to pay 
for the birth of her baby! Said Peggy's 
Room For One More co-star Andrew 
Duggan: "I'll bet that hurt!" . . . Per- 
sonal Obit: Lunching with lovable 
Ernie Kovacs a few days before his 
tragic death, I asked why he made a 
career of zany, unpredictable things. 
Ernie's answer: "For the same reason a 
guest does a handstand as he is leav- 
ing. He wants to be remembered after 
he's gone." . . . You'll be remembered, 
Ernie, but not just for that. 



7m> r 



Bob Barker was preparing a pretty 
German miss for her appearance on 
Truth Or Consequences. "Frankly," 
he said, "you must expect anything to 
happen to you on this show." "Oh, 
that's okay," she smiled. "I'm not mar- 
ried." . . . Heard on the set of new 
Warner series Lone Sierra: "That 
dance of Evan McCord and Kathy 
Bennett? We're calling it The Pretzel' 
— sort of a hard Twist." . . . Peter 
Brown says he saw a young woman 
driving a flashy car in Las Vegas with a 
sign on the back of the car reading, 
"Just Single!" No, he didn't follow — 
most of his time these days is spent 
with Maurine Dawson. Peter is very 
anxious to give marriage another try. 



Broadway lark Julie Andrews and 
funny gal Carol Burnett team for a 
black-tie night at Carnegie Hall this 

month Pat Boone tells of meeting 

a young starlet who, when asked how 
she felt about Red China, replied: 
"Oh, it's just fine, as long as it doesn't 
clash with the tablecloth!" . . . Mario 
Thomas, who loves animals, had a 
field day during shooting of a recent 
Joey Bishop Show segment calling for 
a Great Dane, French Poodle, Chihua- 
hua, and two Siamese cats. Just to 
liven things up, Mario brought her 
own pet Boxer "Bunny" to the studio. 
For once the usually glib-tongued Joey 
was "out-voiced" and left at a com- 
plete loss for words. Mario left, too — 
for N. Y., to hunt for a Broadway play. 



: 




Teasin' Ty with Carolyn Lasater. 




New: Peter Brown, Maurine Dawson. 



Connie Francis, signed by MGM to a 
four-year disc and film pact, is the 
only artist in the record business who 
has had 17 consecutive hits in the past 
two years, eight of which zoomed over 
the million mark. ... Is Ronnie Reagan 
going the extremist route as an act of 
revenge against the Kennedys for their 
blasting of G-E? . . . Ground-breaking 
for the $4 million Motion Picture and 
Television Museum takes place in June. 
. . . House-hunting Mark Richman re- 
ports California real estate agents 
have a real sense of humor. On the 
lawn of one for-sale estate he saw this 
sign: "The magnificent trees on this 
property contain all the chlorophyll 
you'll ever need for healthful living!" 



Oscar winner Charlton Heston will 
be the late Franklin Delano Roosevelt's 
"voice" when ABC-TV presents its 
series on the F.D.R. era in the fall. . . . 
Guy Stockwell spent eight weeks at 
Hollywood's Coronet Theater deciding 
whether it pays to be or not to be Ham- 
let. He'd like to do a Broadway play. 
. . . Starlet Dawn Gray swam in a huge 
glass of champagne at ceremonies 
opening the mammoth Wilshire Boule- 
vard Barrington Plaza Housing Devel- 
opment. . . . We know what a "shotgun 
wedding" is. So now we're learning 
what a "rifleman divorce" comes to. It 
comes to $2,350 a month alimony from 
Chuck Connors to the erstwhile Mis- 
sus. The real, tragic cost: They have 
four children. (Continued on page 8) 



Who's that with... 



Jack 
Benny 



Boone 



Carroll 



Jonathan 
Winters 



Erroll 
Garner 




HHtti 



- 1'^ 




Who else but Arthur Godfrey. And you— if 
you're with us on "Arthur Godfrey Time" 
weekday mornings on CBS Radio. If so, you 
expect the unexpected. If not, you're missing 
the sparks that fly when people and Arthur 
Godfrey get together! Comedians, musicians, 
boy scouts, singers, 4-H Club members, inven- 
tors, writers, movie stars drop in. Then God- 
frey's ad libs set off verbal fireworks that light 



up even the biggest stars in exciting new ways. 
And that's only the beginning. After "Arthur 
Godfrey Time" it's time for more fun— with Art 
Linkletter's "House Party," "The Garry Moore 
Show," "Bing Crosby & Rosemary Clooney." 
All on CBS Radio, every weekday morning. 
Find your radio station listed on the right. Tune 
in "Arthur Godfrey Time" weekdays and you'll 
discover lots of good reasons to stay with it! 









Buddy 
Hackett 



Silvers 



Jackie 
Gleason 



: j4>r-- .:._. 



if" 








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The CBS Radio Network 



Aladdin, popular violinist-singer-comic 
on the Welk Show, collects languages 
the way some people collect stamps. 
Versed in eleven languages and twenty 
dialects, he is now studying Arabic. 
. . . Was that Carol Lawrence win- 
dow-shopping on 57th with Robert 
Goulet? . . . Las Vegas comics report 
that the town getting the biggest hand 
and biggest laugh at the mere mention 
is: Of course, Brooklyn! And naturally 
the state that gets the most applause 
is Texas. There are always a few Lone- 
Star-Staters in the crowd. . . . Are the 
"art houses" about to switch to com- 
mercial films now that so many old 
movie theaters are surrendering to TV? 
. . . Tennessee Ernie returns to ABC- 
TV, April Fool's Day-plus-one! 



Flick Off the Old Flack: A friend asked 
Stephen Franken (Chatsworth Osborne 
Jr. of the Dobie Gillis show) why he 
didn't get his press agent dad Jerry 
Franken to publicize him. Shrugged 
Steve: "Doctors don't operate on mem- 
bers of their own families. Besides, 
when it comes to publicity, Dad likes 
strangers for clients — strangers that 
pay!'' . . . Thought for the Day: "De- 
fender" E.G. Marshall drives a car 
but only when absolutely necessary. 
"Every time I get behind the wheel," 
says Marshall, "I recall a sign I saw on 
a truck the day I took my first driving 
lesson. It warned: This truck has been 
in eight accidents and hasn't lost one 
yet. Be careful, brother.' I can only 
tell you today — 'Sister, I am!' " 



A Reel Life Character: If ever it 
comes to a pinch, Mel Prestidge, who 
plays Lt. Danny Quon on Hawaiian 
Eye, can actually pull rank. When not 
at Warner Bros., he's on duty as a Los 
Angeles deputy sheriff — if he draws, 
fellas, the shooting won't be just on 
film. .'. . "Ben-Hur" continues to gar- 
ner awards. Latest is "Best Foreign 
Actor of I960" to Charlton Heston, 
courtesy of Circulo De Escritores Cine- 
matograficos of Madrid. . . . NBC-TV's 
DuPont Show Of The Week will present 
"Biography of a Movie" — starring 
Ski-Nose and Der Bingle and based 
on "Road to Hong Kong." . . . Joan 
Fontaine occupies Hugh O'Brian's 
Calif, home while he's in New York and 
she's doing a Dick Powell Show. 






))))) r 






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Champ of the fast-draw gals is 
Mary Astor, taught by cowboy Ben 
Cooper. The actress' third book, "The 
Image of Kate," hits the stores this 
month. . . . Poncie Ponce plans to open 
his own night club. Poncie's nickname 
is "Businessman" since he's been col- 
lecting so much loot from his Karate 
schools. He looks so young on TV, few 
fans realize that he is the father of 
three children. . . . The Hex With Sex: 
A bald pate proved "it" for Yul Bryn- 
ner. A skinny frame spelled "SA" for 
Frank Sinatra. Being oversized meant 
"sex-cess" for James Arness and Dan 
Blocker. So why are so many perfectly 
proportioned, hairy and handsome 
young actors out of work? Eh? 




Continued from page 5 



The Twist on Her Mind: Ann B. Davis' 

new TV series, R.B. And Myrnalene, 

will see her making like a secretary 
again. But instead of the tight bun she 
wore on the old Bob Cummings show, 
she'll swank about the office with a 
braid. . . . First project for Brian Kelly's 
new Kel-Mar Productions is a pilot for 
a High Sierra Snow Lodge series. . . . 
Patti Page wants to be forgotten — 
that is, as a singer. Winding up her stint 
at the Las Vegas Dunes, Patti an- 
nounced she's signed Audrey Thomas 
to script an original screenplay, "Ten- 
nessee Waltz," titled after Patti's big- 
gest disc click. Says she, "I hope 1962 
is the year I'll be cast solely as an ac- 
tress, without even one number to sing." 



■^ ((((( "^- 



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•<-« 






> ///// 



When Grant Williams of Hawaiian 
Eye came down with a "sloppy cold," 
he was nursed by lovely Leslie Par- 
rish. A week later, Leslie had to have 
a wisdom tooth out and Grant took 
over the job of nursing her. . . . The 
circle is completed. "Marty," which 
bowed on TV ten years ago, then went 
on to movie fame, now returns to tele- 
vision. ABC will launch a Sunday night 
series of two-hour film programs April 
8, with 15 top United Artists pictures, 
including "Marty," "The Pride and the 
Passion," "Witness for the Prosecu- 
tion." . . . Ex-Champagne Lady Alice 
Lon, who has lived in Dallas since 
J she left the Welk show in 1959. wed 
R airlines pilot George W. Bowling. 
They'll make their home in Texas. 



Let George Do It: Since helping 
Bobby Darin, Joanie Sommers and 
Ann-Margret up the ladder, George 
Burns has become a target for every 
stage-struck kid. While planing to Las 
Vegas for the Darin opening at the 
Flamingo, George was served coffee 
by a striking young stewardess. "Want 
to get into show biz?" he asked. The 
girl nodded, too excited to speak. 
"Okay," said George, "this is an audi- 
tion. Kick the back of your head and 
say cheese." . . . Such sexcitement. They 
closed the Cain's Hundred set at MGM 
because the skimpy-clad cuties were 
putting on too much of a show. . . . 
Doris Day's been given ultimatum — 
camouflage freckles on-screen or be 
picketed by American beauticians! 



It Still Spells Ali-money: When 
Brod Crawford got his license to 
wed Joan Tabor in Las Vegas, he 
listed as grounds for his first divorce, 
"I was impossible." The clerk ex'd this 
out and penciled in "mental cruelty." 
. . . Steve Allen, the irrepressible, 
signed to write the score for musical 
about red-hot Sophie Tucker.... Nick 
The Rebel Adams to give May lecture 
on acting at University of South Caro- 
lina. . . . Molly Bee signed five-year 
Liberty Records pact, slated to do 
"The Molly Bee Story" for Star Route. 
. . . Walt Disney planning feature 
starring "Ceffie," the white mule who 
got so many guffaws in "Sergeants 3." 
. . . Andy Williams signed Leslie 
Uggams for his May 4 spec. 



Fiddle-faddle: The death of Fritz 
Kreisler, world-famed violinist, recalls 
the joke he once told about himself. 
Someone he met asked, "What do you 
do?" Kreisler replied, "I scratch a 
little." Quoth the other, "And from 
that you make a living?" ... Is Kathy 
Nolan about to quit The Real McCoys 
for life as a London lady, or is Sir 
Matthew Wellington only blowing 
bubbles? . . . Currently drawing the 
crap-shooters from the tables at the 
Sahara in Las Vegas are The Modern- 
aires with Ray Eberle and Tex Bene- 
ke's band. They add up to nostalgic 
memories . Says Dick Boone, "Fitz- 
gerald once wrote that four A.M. was 
the "midnight of the soul." What hour 
would be the dawn?" 




Ron Harper, host; Cindy Robbins, guest. 



Chat for Frankie, Mary Livingstone. 



JJJJJ r 



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■> *»->. m->* 



Heard Around: Dodie Stevens and 
John Saxon have stars in their eyes. . . . 
Why hulabaloo over Warren Beatty 

turning down role of President Kennedy 
in "Pt 109"? It's still a free country. 
Besides — could be Worren was afraid 
he "couldn't cut the mustard." But this 
ain't the best passport into "the clan." 
. . . Drifting off: Will his new songstress 
— Nica Ventura — replace Keely Smith 
in Louis Prima's aching heart? . . . Did 
Rocky Cooper pull the rug from under 
news commentator Les Lampson's ro- 
ho-mance with daughter Maria? . . . 
Will Newton Minow's razz and Robert 
Sarnoff's sass, at probe of TV sex and 
violence, end in a television self-cen- 
soring code like the movies'? 




Mrs. T., Danny T. — and Jerry Lewis. 



Brod Crawford and bride Joan Tabor. 



<-m +-m 






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Beat me, Daddy: Cyd Charisse in- 
sisted on a realistic pummeling from 
Kirk Douglas in "Two Weeks in An- 
other Town." Having given her all for 
art, she took to bed till the aches were 
eased. . . . Don Everly wed long-time 
girlfriend Venetia Stevenson in San 
Diego, after graduating from Marine 
boot camp. Venetia will forsake act- 
ing and live wherever Don is stationed. 
. . . Horace Heidt Junior has whipped 
together a swinging combo that's play- 
ing the school circuit in San Fernando 
Valley. . . . Sez Dick Powell: "I 
wanted to aim 'higher' once. After all 
those years in musicals, I decided to be 
an actor. I wanted to be a regular Paul 
Muni. Now look at me." A lot of folks 
do, Dick, and they like what they see. 



- 




Dick Chamberlain and Sharon Hugueny. 



Meet the missus, grins Poncie Ponce. 



"Every Day Was Velvet" 



10 



The death of Ernie Kovacs cut loose volumes of reports 
about his baronial manner of living. He paid a cook 
$1,000 a month. He smoked 20 cigars a day at $2 apiece. 
He collected guns, armor and Rolls-Royces. 

He tossed big all-night and next-day poker games, and 
maintained a turntable in his driveway for pointing guests 
homeward in their own garish cars. 

They referred to him as the zany Hungarian who had 
his private steam room and a communications system 
throughout his Beverly Hills abode which could reach 
him in the remotest bathroom. 

When Ernie's friends were interviewed, they told of 
his love of living, the unselfishness and humor of the 
man. "A lovely and dear man," said his friend Jack 
Lemmon, and similar sentiments were echoed by Frank 
Sinatra, Dean Martin and Kim Novak. 

It would be a shame, however, if the memory people 
carry of Ernie was no more complete than that. He was 
a character, all right, and all of the nice things his friends 
mention, but he was much more. During the past several 
years, I had the opportunity to observe Ernie Kovacs 
quite closely and become his friend. Let me fill in a few 
blanks, before it is too late. 

With the possible exception of the late Fred Allen, no 
comedian worked harder or more devotedly at his craft 
than Ernie. Like Fred, he pre- {Please turn the page) 



This is a tribute to a man 
we'll all miss — badly. But it is 
not a sad story. Instead, this 
is Ernie Kovacs — the way he'd 
want you to remember him 

by 
HAL HUMPHREY 




"Every Day Was Velvet" 



The death of Ernie Kovacs cut loose volumes of reports 
about his baronial manner of living. He paid a cook 
$1,000 a month. He smoked 20 cigars a day at $2 apiece, 
lie collected guns, junior and Rolls-Royces. 

lie tossed lug all-night and next-day poker games, and 
maintained a turntable in his driveway for pointing guests 
I ward in their nun garish cars. 

They referred to him as the zanj Hungarian who had 
Ins private Bteam room and a communications system 
throughout his Beverly Hills abode which could reach 

liim in the remotest bathroom. 

When Ernie's friends were interviewed, they told of 
his lo\c of living, th<' unselfishness and humor of the 
man. "A lovely and dear man," said his friend Jack 
Lemmon, and similar sentiments were echoed by Frank 
Sinatra. Dean Martin and kirn Novak. 

[I would be a shame, however, if the memory people 

oarr > "' Ernie was "" re complete than that. He was 

a character, all right, and aU of the nice things his friends 
mention, but he was much more. During the past several 
N '' ; ""' ' had ll "' opportunity to observe Ernie Kovacs 
quite closelj and become his friend. Lei me fill in a few 
blanks, before it is too late. 

With the possible exception of the late Fred Allen, no 
comedian worked hardei or more devotedlj at his craft 
"»»" Emie. l.ikc Fred, he pre- [PUase turn the page) 



This is a tribute to a man 
we'll all miss — badly. But it is 
not a sad story. Instead, this 
is Ernie Kovacs — the way he'd 
want you to remember him 

by 
HAL HUMPHREY 









- 0' 






NflC* mt M M 




Every Day Was Velvet" 



12 



ferred to create his own ideas and ma- 
terial, and he put in long, exhaustive 
hours at it. It was an uncompromising 
labor. If his creative motors were turn- 
ing over properly, Ernie might knock 
out his ideas for a 30-minute show in 
30 minutes. Other times, he would be 
at one idea for days before he felt it 
was right. 

After sessions like this, Ernie had 
very little tolerance for TV executives 
who felt compelled to fly-speck his ef- 
forts without even attempting to find 
out what he was trying to do. 

"I get tired of fighting the 'Don't- 
you-think?' boys," said Ernie. "You 
work and sweat to bring something dif- 
ferent to a show, and then during the 
dress rehearsal these guys pop up 
and begin by saying, 'Don't you think 
it would be better if. . . .'" 

He was never afraid to incur the 
ill-will of those who were in a position 
to damage his career. A career, to 
Ernie, was secondary to satisfying him- 
self, no matter how high the price. 

It wasn't that Ernie believed he was 
a genius, and everyone else in the busi- 
ness was a dummkopf. He accepted 
qualified criticism as graciously as any- 
body, and realized that not all of his 
creations were polished gems. 

One of Ernie's favorite characteriza- 
tions on his ABC-TV shows was "Percy 
Dovetonsils," the fellow who detested 
coming to grips with the world and 
preferred reading poetry. Ernie once 
described him as "a beautiful soul who 
hasn't quite made it over the line into 
this rude, virile world." 

I'm sure that one reason for Percy's 
being a favorite of Ernie's was other 
comics' inability to copy him. Ernie's 
inventiveness was often (and still is) 
certified by the fact that his contem- 
poraries were not above purloining 
whole bits of business from him, and 
branding them as their own. 

Ernie liked to be outspoken, and he 
no doubt enjoyed the shock he created 
with this almost bullish and supposedly 
outgoing attitude toward the world. 
Blended into this side of his person- 
ality, however, was not only a sensi- 
tivity to people but an almost tender 
side to the man himself. 

The reports about Ernie's mode of 
living were essentially true. He loved 
to live it up big, not to be ostentatious 
— he never advertised it. He never em- 
ployed a personal press agent. 

Money, to Ernie, wasn't a form of 
security. It was simply something civil- 
ization told him he must have in cer- 
tain quantities when the bill-collectors 
came around. It wasn't likely to spoil 
Ernie. He never kept the stuff around 
long enough to feel tainted. 

Much of Ernie's lust for living — $2 
cigars, the finest liquors, gambling, 
traveling, fine clothes, mansions, cars 
— could be traced to an experience that 
almost took his life. 

When he was 19 and working in 



continued 

summer stock in Brattleboro, Vermont, 
he let himself run down. Playing cards 
all night, not having enough money to 
eat well, low resistance, led to double 
pneumonia and pleurisy and he was 
carted off to the New York City charity 
hospital on Welfare Island. After three 
months, he was transferred to a New 
Jersey charity hospital, since he was 
originally a Jersey resident. 

Every week, the doctor would jab a 
needle through his ribs to drain the 
liquid. And the next day — "I could 
hear the liquid sloshing around me 
inside, again. And then I'd have to lie 
in bed, staring at the ceiling." 

At a time of life when a young man 
should be chasing girls and dreaming 
big dreams, Ernie was cooped up in 
a dreary hospital, a recipient of state 
charity. And all around him was 
death. 

"It was depressing," he recalled. "In 
the summer, you could hear the con- 
vertibles taking the fellows and their 
girls to the beach. So I decided to get 
out, too. I'd climb out the window and 
meet my father outside, and he'd give 
me a shotgun and I'd go hunting for 
rabbits in the woods nearby. At other 
times, I had a girl friend who'd meet 
me outside the grounds and take me 
out for a ride and coffee." 



World of shadows 

He couldn't keep still; he refused 
to knuckle down to the inevitability of 
death. So he ran a poker game in the 
bathroom. He started a checker tour- 
nament and everybody got so excited, 
the doctor ordered it stopped. He ran 
a hospital newspaper, did it all himself. 
"Everybody got thinner and thinner 
and died," he once said. "So I ate 
everything in sight, and kept my weight 
up." 

He took advantage of a bad situation 
by improving his mind. He read one 
book each day, while at the same time 
wearing headphones to listen to classi- 
cal music on the radio. 

He also entered contests, sending in 
jingles and slogans. He finally won 
$65, gave it to his mother (who was 
estranged from his father) and she 
bought an old model-A Ford to drive 
in to see him. 

His zest for life apparently was in- 
herited, and as he lay in bed, fight- 
ing for his existence, he vowed that 
if he ever got out alive, he'd make 
every minute count. 

One day he made up his mind that 
he had no future in the hospital. He 
had been hospitalized for 18 months, 
and enough was enough! He notified 
the astonished doctors that he was 
leaving. They warned him that, if he 
walked out, he wouldn't live three full 
days. Ernie vowed, "I'd rather die on 
my feet in three days than die on my 
back in three years!" 

He walked out jauntily, joined his 



. 



mother in Trenton, New Jersey. She 
rented a small store, and hung a cur- 
tain. In front of the curtain, she sold 
house dresses for $2. In back of the 
curtain, they slept on the floor. 

He got a job directing a local-talent 
show, although he still had a tempera- 
ture of 102. For more than a year, he 
worked on this show, getting no salary, 
but being happy — and simply ignoring 
the fever. 

When friends urged him to go back 
to the hospital, he refused. "Every day 
I'm on my feet is velvet . . . pure vel- 
vet! By all odds, I should be dead 
by now." 

Regaining his health, he went on 
through life like that: Every day was 
velvet ! 

The one element not mentioned in 
Ernie's life here, so far, is his family 
— his talented wife, Edie Adams, and 
daughters Betty, 14, Kippie, 13, and 
Mia Susan, 2Y 2 . 

Ernie frequently used to stomp 
around his canyon manse shouting re- 
belliously about being "surrounded by 
females." (His mother lived with him, 
too.) He ranted about the inefficiency 
of the household help, performed like 
a bear with a sore tail whenever the 
phone rang and it wasn't for him. 

This, coupled with his 24-hour card 
games, might lead other women to 
wonder how Edie could put up with 
such pandemonium. It never occurred 
to Edie that she was "putting up" with 
anything. Edie has done such wifely 
things as commuting to California each 
weekend by plane to spend eleven 
hours with Ernie, while she was co- 
starring in Broadway's "Li'l Abner." 

At a party one night in New York, 
Edie dropped a cigar from her purse. 
A friend asked if she had taken up 
the habit! "No," said Edie, "but I 
miss Ernie so, that it helps every once 
in a while to caress this cigar and 
smell its fragrance." 

What Ernie had which most Holly- 
woodites don't have was a sense of 
humor about himself and his family. 
Were he to read anything so personal 
as this piece, he would laugh his most 
maniacal laugh, and toss out several 
explosive Anglo-Saxon words to label it. 

Going to Ernie's home for an inter- 
view was always difficult. "Aw, let's 
talk about something pleasant," Ernie 
would say. "Who wants to read about 
me or television? And if you put both 
in the same column, you're really 
dead!" 

So, you would sit and swap stories 
and get a lift from listening to Ernie's 
matchless descriptions of his travails 
as a man trying to put laughter on a 
paying basis in TV. 

Ernie was writing three books, the 
last time we visited. The titles were 
"Nuclear Fission at Home," "John Has 
Fungus" and "How to Rob Small 
Stores." I only hope he got to finish 
them. — The End 







ON THE RECORD 



APRIL 1962 



Bobby Scott 
Music Editor 



SAVE OUR SONGS 

The Twist has moved in on the music 
scene, but another wind is beginning to 
blow. It is, at present, not of hurricane 
dimension, but it is building, and since 
most of you probably know about the 
Twist, let me tell you of this new turn. 

Last year, we saw the arrival of a 
folk artist who captivated the country. 
Joan Baez, Vanguard recording artist, 
experienced huge sales on her first two 
albums. We also saw the Kingston Trio 
arrive, then the Limeliters. Last Fall 
saw the return of the great folk singer 
Josh White. (This time he incorporated 
his children in his act.) 

Among this month's records, the 
Twist albums were out-numbered two to 
one by folk or folk-derived pop albums. 
In this issue, you'll see reviews of Jo 
Stafford, Hank Williams, a newcomer 
Walter Forbes, a romantic country 
string album and the Limeliters. 

I think we'll be getting more, too. 
Verve Records informs me that they will 
shortly release two more albums of Big 
Bill Broonzy. A young trio, Peter, Paul 
and Mary, seem to be just coming in 
view. They have been doing very well 
at the Blue Angel in New York. 

What seems to be behind this, is the 
desire of American people to recognize 
and endorse their folk music as some- 
thing that is needed culturally. 

In the past, only smaller, independent 
labels like Riverside, Vanguard, Eleck- 
tra and others bore the burden of keep- 
ing folk music alive. Of course, the 
major labels have always dabbled a bit, 
but nothing to constitute a shot in the 
arm. But now the worm turns. There 
is an awful lot of action going on, and 
justly so. 

For the first time in a long while, we 
have no dearth of very high level young 
folk artists, which is an indication of 
the growing concern with folk music. 

I can assure you though without your 
endorsement, purchases and support, 
the whole movement, with its very fine 
(Continued on page 20) 



Johnny 

Carson's 

Corner 



• We haven't had a hit song about dogs 
in some time, but despite this, 
several months ago the City of New 
York experimented with a novel idea. 
Some nameless genius decided what the 
canine population sorely needed were 
comfort stations. How the need was 
determined eludes me. I personally 
know three dogs in my apartment build- 
ing that were not questioned at all. 
Nevertheless, the city proceeded to erect 
a test comfort station, a neat arrange- 
ment of white sand and a fire hydrant, 
enclosed by a small screen. The screen, 
I assume, was to spare the dogs any 
undue embarrassment. As they say at 
Cape Canaveral: — "It did not go ac- 
cording to plan." Actually, dogs went 
two or three blocks out of their way 
to avoid it. I don't know the final dis- 
position of the comfort stations — I be- 
lieve they were torn down to make room 
for some slums. 




Actually, the venture was doomed 
from the start. The dogs already have 
the largest comfort station in town — 
the area from 5th Avenue to the East 
River — and believe me, the dogs do not 
avoid this area. As a matter of fact, I 
have the suspicion dogs come from as 
far away as Newark to use the facili- 
ties. If you doubt me, try walking to 
work some morning from First Avenue. 
I have a hunch this was the beginning 
of the Twist. 

Now, I like dogs generally — I have 
had many of them. The first one was 
named Tanton — just a mutt. I never 
liked pedigrees. I can't see owning a 
dog with a better blood line than I 
have. Tanton was a cross between a 
Great Dane and a Collie. He grew like 
crab grass. We finally had to get rid 
of Tanton. One day he ate the City 
Council. The second dog I owned dur- 
(Continued on page 20) 



13 




ON THE RECORD 



Your Monthly ON RECORD Guide 




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POPULAR 

••The Lettermen, A Song for Young 
Love (Capitol) — This marks the debut 
of three young fellows who just hardly 
can sustain an album's worth of music. 
They get a rather nice blend, although 
they still have a way to go. The style 
of the group begins to wear on this re- 
viewer half-way thru the second side. 
The format of young love seems not a 
bad idea, but it might have been a 
better package, had they turned the 
boys loose, a little. They certainly do 
some tunes gracefully. I'd watch for the 
following album. The tunes include 
"I'll Be Seeing You," "Smile," "When 
I Fall in Love," "Dreamer," "The Way 
You Look Tonight" and others. 

•••Sing Out!, The Limeliters 
(RCA Victor) — This is a very enter- 
taining album. These lads pump it out, 
injecting humor where they can. The 
track "Joy in the Land" highlights one 
side. The whole album has the profes- 
sional stamp upon it. Listen for the 
touching "Everywhere I Look This 
Mornin'," also the surprisingly Latin 
"Golden Bell" and "Wayfarin' Stran- 
ger," which is given the solo voice treat- 
ment. Lots of entertainment here. 

••Horn A-Plenty, Al Hirt-Billy May 
Orch. (RCA Victor)— For all lovers of 
the big pulsing band and Al Hirt's ex- 
citing and lyric trumpet, here's your 
cup of tea. Billy May has turned in 



some beautiful arrangements, and the 
band is first-rate. All this and the 
bearded wonder's biting trumpet. "Holi- 
day for Trumpet," "Easy Street," "Till 
There Was You" and a host of swingers. 
Very nicely done. 

•••This Heart Of Mine, Carol 
Lawrence (Choreo) — A sparkling and 
sophisticated group of tunes, beautifully 
arranged and sung delightfully by Miss 
Lawrence. She is, I'm confident, one of 
the few Broadway-type singers who will 
make a dent in the popular circles. Her 
readings, though at times over dramatic, 
are good. She has the capacity to swing, 
too! 

The scope of the tunes proves out 
how much she is capable of doing. The 
touching "The Year Turns 'Round," the 
different, Carmichael tune, "I Get 
Along Without You Very Well" and the 
title song. Dick Hazard and Harry Betts 
deserve much credit for the back- 
grounds, all of which maintain a strong 
level. For those who like productions, 
large in size, investigate this album. 

••Linger Awhile With Vic Da- 
mone (Capitol) — A very settled pack- 
age. He's one of the better voices you'll 
hear, but there is a lot this album could 
have achieved and didn't. Nice warm ar- 
rangements, fair readings of the lyrics, 
but that "exciting it" isn't in evidence. 
There are moments, but it's common 
knowledge how wonderful Vic can be. 
E for effort. 








••The Classic Delia, Delia Reese 
(RCA Victor) — A compilation of tunes 
adapted from classical themes. Included 
is the hit Puccini theme, "Don't You 
Know." Delia belts them out in her own 
inimitable way, with some fine backing 
from Glenn Osser and orchestra. Her 
readings have never thrilled this re- 
viewer, as they rely more on Delia's 
style than on the message of the lyric. 
At any rate, for those who dig the style, 
it's a goodie. 

JAZZ 

•••FOCUS, Stan Getz— Comp. by 
Eddie Sauter — Cond. by Hershy Kay 
(Verve) — Here, the most popular jazz 
tenor saxophonist in the last ten years 
turns in another monumental perform- 
ance. This time we hear him in a setting 
of strings, plus the extended modern 
compositions of veteran writer Eddie 
Sauter. He covers every mood. Beauti- 
ful lyric playing on the slow "I Remem- 
ber When" which sort of just sits as he 
glides. Chugging along in the "Night 
Rider." He seems to enter a completely 
new area with this album, one of much 
greater dimension. Eddie Sauter string 
writing is not lush or sectional. It's 
more like linear chamber music writing, 
the qualities of each piece, are developed 
to the utmost. Many stars for this won- 
derful excursion into some new areas 
for jazz. This is music to listen to and 
listen to and listen. . . . 



14 



-K^C^C GOOD LISTENING 



-K-K FAIR SOUNDS 
H< IT'S YOUR MONEY 



•••Mel Torme-My Kind Of Mu- 
sic (Verve) — It's a real velvet delight 
when Torme sings his own material. 
This album's chock full of the best 
Torme-written tunes such as: "Born 
To Be Blue," "County Fair," "A Stran- 
ger in Town" and the classic "Christ- 
mas Song." (Which ironically was 
made a hit by Nat Cole.) Mel's singing 
is better than ever. The arrangements 
are well fitting. This album was re- 
corded in England where Mel seems to 
be just about the hottest. After hearing 
"County Fair" again I can tell you it's 
as beautiful as ever. It's this reviewer's 
humble opinion that Torme tunes are as 
important as his finely polished reso- 
nant voice. I could listen to five albums 
like this. 




••••Very Tall, The Oscar Peterson 
Trio along with Milt Jackson (Verve) 
— Four bigger jazz talents you will not 
find! This album is very tall and wide. 
Oscar's piano-playing, always full of 
energy and drive, deviates to Milt's 
rather pointed and subtle path for 
several incredibly relaxed tunes, "Green 
Dolphin Street" and Milt's beguiling 
"Heart Strings." Oscar's left hand 
creates the hacking sound in "Work 
Song" as Ray Brown and Ed Thigpen 
romp behind the proceedings. I find 
Milt to be very comfortable and creative 
in the setting of Oscar's trio. In fact, he 
appears much more relaxed with them 



than he generally does with his steady 
group, the Modern Jazz Quartet. These 
are two of the few great improvisers 
left. Fresh and invigorating, heartily 
recommended. 



HENRY MAAlCtWt 




•••Combo!, Henry Mancini (RCA 
Victor) — A well organized jazz group, 
integrating some good solos by the 
talented Art Pepper on clarinet, Pete 
Condoli on trumpet and Johnny Wil- 
liams on piano and harpsichord. 
Mancini's arrangements, which are 
underwritten to leave room for the jazz 
blowing, are all top level. Very inter- 
esting are "Swing Lightly," "Moanin'," 
the new jazz classic, and "Everybody 
Blow." For buffs, it's recommended. 

JAZZ SPECIAL 

••••The Essential Art Tatum 

(Verve) — This brings back many mem- 
ories for me personally. I can remember 
being in California during 1955, just 
ready to get a flight back to New York, 
when I passed a jazz club on Hollywood 
Blvd. and saw a sign stating Tatum 
would be opening there that night. Well, 
I can tell you I stayed three extra days 
and spent them draped over a table tak- 
ing in what I still consider the only 
absolute marvel of the jazz piano. Ta- 
tum will last a long, long time. Not 
even on the horizon is there a pianist 
half as facile. All one has to do is ask 
Oscar Peterson or Billy Taylor, John 



Lewis or any of the piano talents about 
Tatum and then prepare to have your 
ear bent for hours. 

Tatum is a legend, and it's a pleas- 
ure to see Verve's Essential Series bring 
some of the best interpretations from 
their original Tatum Series, which in 
itself was marvelous, into this album. 

I remember while I was working with 
Gene Krupa, he related to me how, even 
though Tatum only had a bit of vision 
left in one eye, it was impossible to 
sneak things over on him, such as cheat- 
ing at cards and other playful things. 
Well, you can believe it. He rarely ever 
leaves a rock unturned musically. He 
sifts everything out of a piece. Listen 
to "Elegy." He does everything but play 
it backwards. 

Every track in this album is a joy. 
"Willow, Weep for Me" is done up in 
all shades. Yes, and the shadow of 
Tatum permeates everything. On a few 
tunes you'll find the tenor saxophone 
of another big talent, Ben Webster. The 
runs, the striding left hand out of the 
past, the warmth and the humor of 
Tatum are all here. 

If you are a casual jazz fan and a 
lover of fine pianists, I, without re- 
luctance, recommend this without res- 
ervation. You jazz fans need no intro- 
duction to the thirty fingers of Art 
Tatum. For record libraries, a must ! ! ! 

P.S. (Art Tatum passed away in 
1956, but lives through the remarkable 
medium of the phonograph recording. 
Consider yourself lucky to be able to 
hear him. I do.) 




15 




Your Monthly ON RECORD Guide* 




SPOKEN WORD 

****The Story-Teller, a session 
with Charles Laugh ton (Capitol) (2 
LPs) — This album, I honestly feel, no 
one should be without. After so much 
sick humor, endlessly chattering come- 
dians cornering the spoken word mar- 
ket, this is a potful of fresh air. Mr. 
Laughton's materials are all worth 
hearing about. His light vignettes about 
The Goldsteins and Margaret O'Brien, 
excerpts from Jack Kerouac's "Dhar- 
raa Bums" and Shakespeare's "Caesar," 
some barbs from "Major Barbara" by 
Bernard Shaw and "The Phaedrus" by 
Plato are some of the gems. His voice 
becomes an instrument, the shadings, 
the resonant chest sound, the quiet 
laughter that sneaks into phrases, like a 
phantom unseen, unheard, but felt 
strongly. His absorption with righting 
some wrongs, defending modern paint- 
ing, sculpture and writing, not with 
rhetoric, but simplicity, should just not 
be missed. This cannot be recom- 
mended too strongly. A dramatic giant, 
reading and interpreting the works of 
geniuses, with a dash of lightness and 
pixie-ish story-telling, with depth and 
profundity, humor, truth, theater and a 
large dose of Laughton's love for com- 
municating the joy of living. Go out 
and get this one! (The cover and jacket 
with album notes by Mr. Laughton, plus 
two drawings from his collection, on .he 
inside cover, are added pluses. Very 
good taste, indeed.) 



COUNTRY AND FOLK 
MUSIC 

****On Stage! Recorded Live! 

Hank Williams (MGM Records)— 
The great Hank Williams, who passed 
away in 1953 at the age of 29 years, 
was certainly a legend in his own time. 
As a songwriter, you'll remember his 
"Cold, Cold Heart." There were many 
more hits, too. He seemed to stretch out 
all over. His talent and name seem 
synonymous with country music. 

When Hank passed away, the entire 
South took a day to mourn. People 
didn't even work in some cases. This cer- 
tainly showed how much he meant to his 
fans and admirers. MGM Pictures have 




been trying to start the filming of "The 
Hank Williams Story." Elvis Presley 
has even been mentioned for the lead 
part. Let's hope, before not too long, 
we'll be able to enjoy, on the screen, 
the life of the great Hank Williams! 

This album's value lies in the fact 
that it's live. No different takes to 
choose from but one: The performance. 
This album, like the MGM Garland al- 
bum, has historic value. It also has a 
good deal of talk by Williams, pre- 
serving his speaking voice for pos- 
terity. 

For the country fans, this is a must. 
For those who missed this chap's tal- 
ent when he lived, you might take a 
look-listen ! 



***Rakhel— Songs of Israel (Mon- 
itor) — A very interesting journey, 
musically, to the ancient land. Its scope, 
from the enchantingly modal "Gazi 
Lee" (Don't Drive My Lamb) to the 
ever-rejoicing "Hava Nagila," is quite 
broad. Rakhel (a rather stunning 
beauty, judging from the cover) is cer- 
tainly a talented young lady. She 
strides through the material, with much 
passion and a flair for vocal gesture. 
The real sleeper on the album, not of 
course to slight Rakhel, is the seven- 
man ensemble and the arrangements, 
which create vividly the Mid-Eastern 
locale. Considering the level of folk 
albums, this certainly is above aver- 
age. Care to join the pilgrimage? 

****Jo Stafford Sings American 
Folk Songs, Orch. Cond. Paul Weston 
(Capitol) — Well! This is absolutely 
enchanting. No reservations about Miss 
Stafford. This is a compilation of the 
finest ballads of the Southern Appa- 
lachians, or hill music, as it were. Jo's 
ability to sing folk is huge. She reads 
so well, keeps the vibrato to a mini- 
mum, and deliberates over each touch- 
ing phrase. I cannot recommend this 
strongly enough. The tunes include 
"Barbara Allen," "Black is the Color," 
the very warming "Red Rosey Bush" 
and "Poor Wayfaring Stranger," also 
the playful "Sourwood Mountain," 
"Single Girl" and "Cripple Creek." 
Bravos for all concerned. Don't leave 
this one in the store, it belongs with 
the best in your collection. 




16 



*-M(-K GREAT! 
-MC-fc GOOD LISTENING 



-K-K f=AIR SOUNDS 
-+C IT'S VOUff MONEY 




****Ballads and Bluegrass, Wal- 
ter Forbes (RCA Victor) — Good news! 
Roots seem to be in order these days, 
and this young fella knows very well 
how to dig! I continue to be amazed at 
the quality of our young folk singers. 
Walter Forbes' talent, although ground- 
ed in folk, will make a dent in ihe 
"pop" market. He's full of fire! His 
lyric reading is excellent, his choice of 
tunes fits his present capacities. (The 
album notes contain no mention of the 
wonderful Blue Ridge band or the 
voices who join Walter intermittently.) 
This is a young lad to watch! 

CLASSICAL 

****Gabriel Faure— Complete 
Works For Piano Vol. I, Grant 
Johannesen (Golden Crest) — This dou- 
ble jacketed, twin pack is certainly a 
refreshing breath of French piano 
music. Contents range through several 
periods of Faure's creative musical life. 
The eight short pieces Op. 84, nine pre- 
ludes Op. 103, several impromptus and 
barcarolles, a nocturne here, a valse 
there, all make the dip into the fountain 
of Faure's genius an enriching experi- 
ence. The fine Grant Johannesen 
appears throughout the four sides en- 
tirely sympathetic to Faure's compelling 
need for shadings. As the master him- 
self was a gifted pianist and organist, 
the pieces lie beautifully for the instru- 
ment. Golden Crest and Mr. Johanne- 
sen can well be pleased with their Vol. 



I of Faure Piano Music. The quality of 
the recorded sound is not as first rate 
as the choice of material and perform- 
ance. Still, plenty here merits attention. 

***Johannes Brahms— Short 
Piano Pieces, Miklos Schwalb, piano 
(Golden Crest) (2 LPs) — Again Gold- 
en Crest comes up with a twin album 
pack of interesting, not often heard 
piano music of the classical-romantic 
giant, Johannes Brahms. As with the 
Faure package, I think this is an intro- 
duction of the proper dimension for peo- 
ple not so inclined to listen to classical 
music. The pieces played here are of 
short lengths, and so people who feel 
larger works are sometimes hard to 
understand, because of their breadth, 
can easily enter and see the form of these 
shorter works. Miklos Schwalb runs the 
gamut of expression here. The heroic, 
militantly played Rhapsodie in E-flat 
Minor Op. 119 and transparent, lulling 
Intermezzo in A-flat Op. 76 are only two 
of the gems you'll find here. With 
all credit to Mr. Schwalb, I think this 
package stands on the pieces. A good 
newcomer to all record libraries. 

MOOD MUSIC 

•^■^■^Capitol Records has just brought 
out three, sort of, mood albums all in- 
tent upon the most relaxed reactions 
from the listener. It could aptly be 
called "easy music." 

Night Fall — On this one, Carmen 
Dragon and the Capitol Symphony Or- 




chestra glide smoothly thru a set of "To 
Sleep" music. Highlighted are nine 
orchestral vignettes, Brahms' "Lulla- 
bye," Ravel's "Pavane." All low-keyed 
and subtle. 

Billy Leibert's gentle Romantic 
Country Strings quietly takes you into 
folk country. Country tunes, standards 
that is, are brushed off and presented in 
a very unassuming manner. 

Alfred Newman's movie "Themes" 
is the most interesting, runs through 
such goodies as "Laura," "Invitation," 
"Tammy," "Again," "Love Is a Many- 
Splendored Thing," "The Bad and the 
Beautiful," "Pinky" and others. Jazz 
saxophonist-bandleader Benny Carter 
is responsible for the charm in some of 
the arrangements. A good performance, 
a good buy. 




SHOW AND FILM MUSIC 

•*"fr*The Original Soundtrack 
From "Summer And Smoke," Elmer 
Bernstein (RCA Victor) — For those 
people who would like to be reminded 
of the stunning performance turned in 
by Geraldine Page and Laurence Har- 
vey, this is the way. The music, though 
terse, as most movie music must be, is 
quite enjoyable as a separate entity. It 
covers a wide range of moods, but con- 
stantly brings the touch of tragedy so 
inherent in the Tennessee Williams 
play. Elmer ("Man With the Golden 
Arm") Bernstein again rates kudos. 



17 




ON THE RECORD 




TOPS IN SINGLES 

1) Chip, Chip, Gene McDaniels (Liberty 1344) — Very strong, should climb. 

2) Open, Buddy Knox (Liberty 1355) — A strong contender. 

3) Tomorrow's Clown, Bill Giant (MGM 13054)— Watch this one. 

4) Do-Re-Mi, Lee Dorsey (Fury F2011)— A sleeper. 

5) Daddy Knows Best, Carlo Gerace (Chancellor C1093)— With a little 
help, this could be in the money. 

6) Motorcycle, Tico and the Triumphs (Amy) — This may be the sleeper. 

7) I'm Going But I'll Be Back; Sugar Babe, Buster Brown (Fire)— A 
very strong coupling could do it. 

8) Kansas City Twist, Harrison (Fury-Wilbert Harrison) — This might do 
it, with some help. 

9) Hip Twist, Shirley Scott (Prestige) — Good for the juke box! 

10) Struttin'n Twistin', Roosevelt Grier (Liberty) — This could sneak up. 



A LIFE IN SONG 



••••The Judy Garland Story, 

Vol. II (M-G-M)— What you have 
here is just about the biggest talent 
in the entertainment business, roaring 
along as usual. This is an historically 
valuable album. It covers things Judy 
did in pictures, dating back to 1938. 
The legendary "You Made Me Love 
You" from "Broadway Melody" which 
has the famous "Dear Mr. Gable" 
verse. You'll go through a few songs 
from the Andy Hardy movies, then 
move on to her big one, "The Trolley 
Song" — these tracks, incidentally, are 
from the movie score — from "Meet Me 
In St. Louis." From "St. Louis," there 
is also "The Boy Next Door." An in- 
teresting version of "You Can't Get a 
Man With a Gun" from "Annie Get 
Your Gun" — which movie Judy, in 1950, 
was not quite well enough to make, but 
she did record part of the score in 
anticipation of doing the film. And of 
course, this group would be incom- 
plete without the monumental "Over 




the Rainbow" from "The Wizard of 
Oz." 

It was a pleasure to listen to this 
album in order to review it. Judy affects 
this reviewer like he'd been hit with a 
bomb. For people building a library of 
the important records made, this should 
definitely be included. 

Much credit to MGM Records, for 
repackaging these gems of show busi- 
ness' "Golden Girl." 



18 






LUNCH WITH DION 



Several weeks ago, I had the pleasure 
of taking my midday repast with one of 
the industry's brightest young stars. 

Riding quite high on the nationwide 
best-seller list with "The Wanderer," 
Dion remains unassuming. We chatted 
about some of his new recordings, 
which as of yet are not released, and 
about the music and entertainment 
business in general. 

We touched many things, one of 
which was arranged music as opposed 
to the "let's get a band of good players 
together and see what comes out." He 
felt strongly about an arrangement 
constricting and defeating his natural- 
ism. Again, of course, bearing in mind 
who may have written the arrange- 
ment, and what the tune itself requires. 
His point was, that in light of how dif- 
ficult it can be to get an air of excite- 
ment going in a studio, the chances of 
four or five men, who play together 
constantly, getting that feeling, are 
much greater than assembling twenty 
men who may not have ever played 
together before. This, of course, re- 
lates particularly to making single rec- 
ords of the hit variety. Of course, when 
planning an album of standards, other 
things enter in which often require a 
large ensemble and arrangements. 

We reflected on some of the block- 
busters in the business. He spoke very 
strongly about the marvelous perform- 
ing qualities of Sammy Davis, Bobby 
Darin and Harry Belafonte. I'm sure 
we'd have gotten to more had not the 
afternoon been slipping away from us. 

I enjoyed talking to such a bright 
young man, striving' to always improve 
and get the best out of himself and, at 
the same time, to keep his ears wide 
open to what is going on around him. 

*-A"*Run Around Sue, Dion (Laurie 
LLp/2009)— Well, here is a kick for 
all the kids ! Dion shouting out some of 
the big ones. "The Wanderer," "Dream 
Lover," "Take Good Care of My Baby" 
and the title song, all cooking in his 
walkin' groove. The ballads "Life Is 
But a Dream" and "Runaway Girl" are 
done warmly. The band is hollerin' 
right along. This album should do well. 




PIECES OF EIGHTS 

• Roulette just released two albums by the Barry Sisters. One called "Sha- 
lom" bringing us certainly some of the best versions of Jewish songs heard in a 
while. "Exodus" is the big one. Also some standard material in an album entitled 
"We Belong Together." Both very pro . . . MGM has done up the music of 
Jerome Kern. Big band, strings and Kern's best tunes. For the Mood People . . . 
Gene Krupa's band wails right through "Classics in Percussion" on Verve, 
"American Bolero" being the high spot. . . . Incidentally, last month a recording 
session was planned for Gene and Buddy Rich to do, but Buddy got held up in 
Vegas, so Gene had to solo-it. 

The "Subways Are For Sleeping" score has been released in a jazz version by 
Dave Grusin on Epic. . . . On the serious side are two duet albums released by 
Angel and Columbia. De Los Angeles and Fischer-Dieskau sing lieder on 
Angel, and Richard Tucker and Eileen Farrell sing duets from Verdi's 
operas. . . . Roulette has just put out the sound track of the "Hey, Let's Twist" 
movie. Joey Dee's band doing the shouting. ... An album of John Coltrane's 
saxophone-playing recently released on Prestige along with an album by Mose 
Allison. . . . Timi Yuro's "Soul" album on Liberty loaded with standards. . . . 
Joe Basile's Parisian sounds on Audio Fidelity is good mood package. 



19 







ON THE RECORD 



Save Our Songs 

(Continued from page 13) 

talents, will slide once again into the 
woodwork. 

I'd just like to leave you this closing 
thought. Bill Broonzy left America and 
went to Europe and was one of the big- 
gest acts there. It would be a shame if 
Americans left it, once again, to Europe 
to support its best folk artists. You 
know it's our heritage. Let's help it and 
enjoy it! 

Johnny Carson's Corner 

(Continued from page 13) 

ing the war. The price of meat was so 
high I had to put him up on blocks 
for the duration. 

Before I put the cover on the type- 
writer, I think I'd like to lighten the 
situation by passing along an anecdote 
involving a couple of dogs. It seems 
a gent brought a vicious looking Bull- 
dog into a local pub. He growled and 
snarled and made it known to one and 
all that he was a rough, tough woofer, 
who advertised that his bite was going 
to be worse than his bark. As I got it. 
sitting in the corner was a lethargic 
looking, unkempt yellow dog. The Bull- 
dog spied him and went into a rage as 
ambitious, overgrown pups sometimes 
do when they cast an eye on another 
animal. The bartender, recognizing 
trouble, pleaded with the gent in no 
uncertain terms: "Get that dog out of 
here. I don't want a fight in my place." 

Well, the inevitable happened. The 
Bulldog broke away from his leash and. 
fangs bared, headed straight for the 
half-sleeping yellow dog in the corner. 
Friends, it was all over in a minute. 
The yellow dog opened his mouth wide, 
clamped down on the charging over- 
zealous Bulldog and, well, it was no 
contest. 

The Bull was stretched out with all 
the fight gone. The owner stood there 
with a look of amazement on his face. 

"I don't understand this," he said 
to the bartender, "A minute ago that 
dog was sleeping; my dog rushed him 
and — look what happened. What breed 
is he, anyway?" 

"Darned if I know," said the bar- 
tender. "All I can tell you is that they 
brought him over from Africa and you 
should have seen him before I shaved 
that big head of hair off his face." 

Carson stars in Who Do You Trust, as 
seen on ABC-TV, M-F, 3:30 P.M. EST. 



Bill Taggart at benefit for Tex Wil- 
liams — whose home burned in Bel-Air. 




Liberace "warmed" his new house more 
gently — with Linkletter, Bergen, Durante. 




MUSIC-MAKERS 
IN THE NEWS 



Shelley Fabares and Paul Petersen of The 
Donna Reed show wax musical for Colpix. 




Young fans got quite a turn when Troy Donahue and Connie Stevens "twisted" 
during whirlwind tour of N. Y. movie houses. Feature pic? Why, "Susan Slade"! 



20 



Ed Sullivan breaks his silence: 

Thousands have written 

asking me to reconcile with Paar. 

My answer is: 

Once he was mv friend. 





He will not be my friend again. 
Once I could count on him. 
Now I only count him out. 
Even if I wanted to . . . 

I CAN NEVER 

MAKE UP 

JACK PAAR 



(Continued on page 68 ) 



21 




J 




MIKE LANDON ASKS: 





""Were we wrong 

to take 

a black market 



baby. 



? 



99 



The headlines struck Mike Landon with the sickening force of a blow in the stomach. 
From the line of heavy black type marching across the page, fifteen letters stood out, 
burned like the Scarlet A. They spelled "Black Market Baby." 

Mike wadded up the paper and flung it in the wastebasket, as though it were 
something unclean. But even with the paper crumpled and hidden, he could still see 
the sensational headlines, "Doctor Charged With Black Market Baby Sales." 

"Black Market Baby!" Mike spat out the words under his breath. "What do you 
mean, 'Black Market Baby'?" he thought. "Babies that have been given to parents who 
love them? Babies that are giving joy to parents who otherwise would be childless?" 

Like a man hypnotized, like a man under irresistible compulsion, Mike retrieved 
the paper from the basket and smoothed it on the table. Angrily he read the story. 

The doctor who was accused was a man whom he liked and who had done him an 
incomparable favor. One of the babies that the doctor had placed with parents hunger- 
ing to love it was Mike's and Dodie's adopted son, Josh. 

Mike and Dodie had wanted a baby so badly and so long. (Continued on page 70) 



23 




Were we wron g 
to take 
a black market 



*><> 



For Mike, TVs Bonanza had been 
lucky indeed. All happiness seemed 
within their grasp. And then 



The headlines struck Mike Landon with the sickening force of a blow in the stomach. 
From the line of heavy black type marching across the page, fifteen letters stood out, 
burned like the Scarlet A. They spelled "Black Market Baby." 

Mike wadded up the paper and flung it in the wastebasket, as though it were 
something unclean. But even with the paper crumpled and hidden, he could still see 
the sensational headlines, "Doctor Charged With Black Market Baby Sales." 

"Black Market Baby!" Mike spat out the words under his breath. "What do you 
mean, 'Black Market Baby'?" he thought. "Babies that have been given to parents who 
love them? Babies that are giving joy to parents who otherwise would be childless?" 

Like a man hypnotized, like a man under irresistible compulsion, Mike retrieved 
the paper from the basket and smoothed it on the table. Angrily he read the story. 

The doctor who was accused was a man whom he liked and who had done him an 
incomparable favor. One of the babies that the doctor had placed with parents hunger- 
ing to love it was Mike's and Dodie's adopted son, Josh. 

Mike and Dodie had wanted a baby so badly and so long. (Continued on page 70) 



23 




OF THE 




WHICH ONE HAS THE 



fcs» 



(Please turn the page) 




continued 



BATTLE OF THE 






Casey's a surgeon with a wallop. 



Some patients just don't know 
what's best for them. Like the 
women who are always watching 
Dr. Kildare when, really, Ben 
Casey would be better for their 
ills. Or vice versa! 

Both fine doctors but so dis- 
tinctly different. Both young and 
handsome, both possessing that 
secret ingredient which is more 
exhilarating than any "wonder 
drug": Sheer sex appeal. But their 
approach and treatment are almost 
exact opposites. And, after all, 
everyone knows the best doctor is 
the one that suits your personality. 

So just flip the dial and choose 
your side in the battle of the bed- 
side manner. . . . 

In Observation Room A, we 
have a typical Dr. Kildare viewer 
and would-be patient. Here's a 
lady looking for someone to moth- 
er or fall in love with. She may 
not succeed, but she's going to 
come away with the lovely, warm 
feeling that Kildare is such a 
sweet, understanding young man. 
Boyishly enthusiastic, exuding a 
general air of doing his very best, 



»w 



26 



BEDSIDE MANNER! 



he is the American woman's dream 
of the boy next door who needs 
to be taken care of — by the right 
woman. 

Where else can you find a boy- 
next-door who needs you and who 
can also remove a kidney stone? 

Under the influence of his sym- 
pathetic smile and earnest man- 
ner, any girl could enter the hos- 
pital just to visit a friend — and 
come out minus her appendix. 
Kildare not only gives a female the 
will to live. He instills in her the 
desire to get up and run — after 
him. 

Unless, of course, she's already 
chosen another TV medico! 

In Observation Room B, for in- 
stance, we have an ardent and 
faithful fan of Ben Casey — that 
doctor who is so strong, silent, and 
dedicated to the point of trying to 
push the germs away with brute 
force. You just know Ben worked 
his way through med school. 

There is no boyish grin here, no 
light-hearted approach to that corn 
on your big toe. Any other doctor 
might (Continued on page 82) 




Jlmwmx/ [y vmmLl 



U o 



V 



* 



4? * 



MAXINE 
BLOCK 






* 



O 



f 



"I can't talk about it," 
Jimmy Durante told me, 
breathless as a young man in love 
for the first time . . . then proved — just 
like anyone head-over -heels in love at any age 
— that he couldn't stop talking about it! The object 
of his affections? A mite of a baby girl with a bit of a 
nose which is only a minnow alongside the whale of Jimmy's 
world-famous "schnozzola" . . . though it's obvious that every 
tiny feature is engraved larger than life in his big, generous heart. 
Adopted or no, little Cecilia Alicia is the first child for both Jimmy and 



Margie Durante . . . the crowning jewel that became the best of all anniversary 
presents last December — just a year after their long-awaited marriage. Jimmy 
told us all about it, in an exclusive interview, as we chatted one late afternoon in 
his pearl-gray house behind the sculptured lawn on a quiet, tree-shaded street in Beverly 
Hills . . . told us of the joy that has come to the Durantes with the arrival of Cecilia 
Alicia . . . and of the ever-present fear that she might be taken away from them someday 
. . . the still-unresolved question of their eligibility as adopted parents — because of age. Margie 
is now 41, and Jimmy . . . well, Jimmy not only was a widower (following a happy though 
childless marriage) before he ever met Margie, but had embarked on his fantastically successful 
career almost a dozen years before she was born! And adoption agencies seem to frown upon 
any prospective parents past the first flush of youth . . . That's why Jimmy hesitates to talk of this 
new love that has entered his life. "Ya see," he explained in his grammar-fracturing gravel voice, 
'it's better to keep numb — 'cause we don't wanta upset the apple-pie cart by sayin' too much right 
now . . . like how old the baby is, where we got him — -I mean her. I can't get used to sayin' 'her' 
because, for so long, I been thinking we'd get a boy. A girl is just as welcome," he added with a 
blissful beam, "long as we got a healthy baby. That we did. What a pair of lungs!" . . . Hopefully 
the Durantes have already initiated adoption proceedings through a private agency. And, a 
week after her arrival, the pretty, red-haired, brown-eyed infant was christened at St. 
\^^\ Victor Catholic Church — Cecilia, for Margie's mother, and Alicia, just be- ^ 

\^^ cause they like the name. The ceremony was conducted by the same ^^JL. 4. 

priest who baptized Mrs. Durante as a convert to Roman ^ ^_ ^^^r 

^ Catholicism a year ago. "The baby was as ^^^^^^^M * 

^rW ^ good {Continued on page 74) jf M ■ ▼ 

V E to ^ 



28 



Is it friendship 
or is it, . . ? 



You'd think it was qncof the rare and perishable orchids that 
Raymond Burr makes a habit of growing — that's how carefully 
the reports of a budding romance between the scholarly Perry 
Mason of television and the ever-glamorous movie queen, Bar- 
bara Stanwyck, are being handled by those who love to play 
Hollywood's most popular parlor game: "Is it or is it not love?" 
Why this delicate approach in a town where few secrets are kept 
and most rumors blown up to brutal proportions? The answer is 
simple. There are few performers who hold the respect, admira- 
tion and affection of the public "Missy" and Ray Burr do. It is 
obvious that if real love has come to theni, it would not be a light 
or casual thing. Both are intelligent^ mature and possessed of 
depthless pools of sensitivity. Each has known unhappiness and 
has paid the inevitable price for fame. . . . This is why nobody 
with any knowledge of Ray or Barbara expects them to admit 
to more than friendship until they are absolutely certain in their 
own hearts that love and marriage is their mutual path to happi- 
ness. At the moment, they meet such questions with the secret, 
happy smile of a collector who has just acquired a precious 
Tang vase. They have no intention of sharing their delight with 
anybody. Thus an eager town is asking this hopeful question: 
Will the wonderful friendship between these two blossom into 
the most popular love affair Hollywood has known in years? 
While the town asked, TV Radio Mirror went after the answer. 
This is what we found out: {Continued on page 72) 




30 



Is it friend sh 
or is it. . . ? 



You'd think it was one- of the rare and perishable orchids that 
Raymond Burr makes a habit of growing — that's how carefully 
the reports of a budding romance between the scholarly Perry 
Mason of television and the ever-glamorous movie queen, Bar- 
bara Stanwyck, are being handled by those who love to play 
Hollywood's most popular parlor game: "Is it or is it not love?" 
Why this delicate approach in a town where few secrets are kept 
and most rumors blown up to brutal proportions? The answer is 
simple. There are few performers who hold the respect, admira- 
tion and affection of the public "Missy" and Ray Burr do. It is 
obvious that if real love has come to them, it would not be a light 
or casual thing. Both are intelligent mature and possessed of 
depthless pools of sensitivity. Each has known unhappiness and 
has paid the inevitable price for fame. . . . This is why nobody 
with any knowledge of R